Ruth Dawson

first_imgRuth Dawson, a dearly beloved mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, aunt, and friend, was called to be with the Lord on Monday, October 28, 2019, in Longview, Texas, following an extended illness.Ruth was born on February 3, 1923, to Ruby Pearl (Dobbs) Patin and Emile Gustav (Gus) Patin in Port Arthur, Texas.Following her graduation from Thomas Jefferson High School, Ruth was employed by Bell Telephone Company in Port Arthur as a switchboard operator. Her hobbies included gardening, sewing, cooking, baking, and camping.She enjoyed gathering with friends and family in Groves, as well as playing Scrabble and card games with her “new” friends at Buckner Westminster Place in Longview, where she lived for the last 14 years.She was an enthusiastic participant in a variety of Buckner activities, attending orchestra and opera productions, plays, ballet performances, and outings to local places of interest.Ruth is survived by one son, David Dawson, and wife Shela, of Mount Pleasant, TX; one daughter, Bonnie Horstmann, of San Diego, CA; grandson Brian Dawson, wife Katherine, and great-granddaughter, Isabella, of Dripping Springs, TX; grandson Kevin Dawson, wife Shelby, and great-grandchildren, Luke and Katie, of Hallsville, TX; one brother, John Patin, of Arlington, TX; one sister-in-law, Norma Dean, of Lake Jackson, TX; and several nieces and nephews. Next UpShe was a resident of Groves for over 70 years, before moving to Longview in September 2005 after Hurricane Rita.Ruth married the love of her life, Leland Bond (L.B.) Dawson, Jr. on October 27, 1945, and they were happily devoted to each other until L.B.’s passing in March 2008, fondly calling each other by their pet names, “Punkin” and “Lovie.”Ruth was a member of First Baptist Church of Groves for most of her life, where she served as a Sunday School teacher and was a long-time participant in Women’s Missionary Union (WMU).center_img A visitation for family and friends will begin at 1:00 p.m., on Saturday, November 2, 2019, at Levingston Funeral Home, 5601 39th Street, Groves, TX 77619, followed by a service to honor Ruth’s memory at 2:00 p.m. with Dr. Joe Worley and Reverend Charles Miller officiating.Burial will be at Greenlawn Memorial Park.last_img read more

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Scientists discover previously undetected vessels linking brain and immune system

first_imgShare Share on Facebook Share on Twitter LinkedIn Pinterestcenter_img In a stunning discovery that overturns decades of textbook teaching, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have determined that the brain is directly connected to the immune system by vessels previously thought not to exist. That such vessels could have escaped detection when the lymphatic system has been so thoroughly mapped throughout the body is surprising on its own, but the true significance of the discovery lies in the effects it could have on the study and treatment of neurological diseases ranging from autism to Alzheimer’s disease to multiple sclerosis.“Instead of asking, ‘How do we study the immune response of the brain?’ ‘Why do multiple sclerosis patients have the immune attacks?’ now we can approach this mechanistically. Because the brain is like every other tissue connected to the peripheral immune system through meningeal lymphatic vessels,” said Jonathan Kipnis, PhD, professor in the UVA Department of Neuroscience and director of UVA’s Center for Brain Immunology and Glia (BIG). “It changes entirely the way we perceive the neuro-immune interaction. We always perceived it before as something esoteric that can’t be studied. But now we can ask mechanistic questions.”“We believe that for every neurological disease that has an immune component to it, these vessels may play a major role,” Kipnis said. “Hard to imagine that these vessels would not be involved in a [neurological] disease with an immune component.” Email New Discovery in Human BodyKevin Lee, PhD, chairman of the UVA Department of Neuroscience, described his reaction to the discovery by Kipnis’ lab: “The first time these guys showed me the basic result, I just said one sentence: ‘They’ll have to change the textbooks.’ There has never been a lymphatic system for the central nervous system, and it was very clear from that first singular observation – and they’ve done many studies since then to bolster the finding – that it will fundamentally change the way people look at the central nervous system’s relationship with the immune system.”Even Kipnis was skeptical initially. “I really did not believe there are structures in the body that we are not aware of. I thought the body was mapped,” he said. “I thought that these discoveries ended somewhere around the middle of the last century. But apparently they have not.”‘Very Well Hidden’The discovery was made possible by the work of Antoine Louveau, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in Kipnis’ lab. The vessels were detected after Louveau developed a method to mount a mouse’s meninges – the membranes covering the brain – on a single slide so that they could be examined as a whole. “It was fairly easy, actually,” he said. “There was one trick: We fixed the meninges within the skullcap, so that the tissue is secured in its physiological condition, and then we dissected it. If we had done it the other way around, it wouldn’t have worked.”After noticing vessel-like patterns in the distribution of immune cells on his slides, he tested for lymphatic vessels and there they were. The impossible existed. The soft-spoken Louveau recalled the moment: “I called Jony [Kipnis] to the microscope and I said, ‘I think we have something.’”As to how the brain’s lymphatic vessels managed to escape notice all this time, Kipnis described them as “very well hidden” and noted that they follow a major blood vessel down into the sinuses, an area difficult to image. “It’s so close to the blood vessel, you just miss it,” he said. “If you don’t know what you’re after, you just miss it.”“Live imaging of these vessels was crucial to demonstrate their function, and it would not be possible without collaboration with Tajie Harris,” Kipnis noted. Harris, a PhD, is an assistant professor of neuroscience and a member of the BIG center. Kipnis also saluted the “phenomenal” surgical skills of Igor Smirnov, a research associate in the Kipnis lab whose work was critical to the imaging success of the study.Alzheimer’s, Autism, MS and BeyondThe unexpected presence of the lymphatic vessels raises a tremendous number of questions that now need answers, both about the workings of the brain and the diseases that plague it. For example, take Alzheimer’s disease. “In Alzheimer’s, there are accumulations of big protein chunks in the brain,” Kipnis said. “We think they may be accumulating in the brain because they’re not being efficiently removed by these vessels.” He noted that the vessels look different with age, so the role they play in aging is another avenue to explore. And there’s an enormous array of other neurological diseases, from autism to multiple sclerosis, that must be reconsidered in light of the presence of something science insisted did not exist.The findings were published in the journal Nature.last_img read more

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Argos Fall 12-6 to North Alabama in Game Two of GSC Tournament

first_img   CLEVELAND, Miss. –  The University of West Florida baseball team fell to the bats of North Alabama 12-6 in game two of the 2010 Morgan Keegan Gulf South Conference Tournament. The Argos grabbed an early first inning lead but could not hold off the offensive power of the Lions as they pounded out 18 hits in the contest. After pulling within one late in the game the Argos surrendered five unanswered runs to fall 12-6.Kyle Brown led off the game with a base hit, the first hit West Florida has got off Lion’s starter Trey Mitchell this year. Earlier in the season Mitchell tossed a no-hitter against the Argos in a 3-0 win for North Alabama. The Argos added two more hits in the inning off Mitchell, a RBI single from Zach Cates and a two-run single from Greg Pron to give them a 3-0 lead.Argo’s starter Jason Postill held off the Lions for the first two innings but then ran into some trouble in the third. After striking out the first batter of the inning the Lions then knocked five base hits in the inning, including a two-run single by Josh Cyr to give them a 4-3 lead. In the fifth the Argos re-took the lead with a two more runs on RBI singles by Tyler Hastings and Jack Materne. The lead would be short lived as the Lions put up three more runs in the bottom half of the inning to take a 7-5 lead. After a run in the sixth from the Argos pulled within one but the Lions once again responded back in the bottom half of the inning on a solo homerun by Jacob Lamar. The game would get out reach in the seventh as they tacked on four more unanswered runs, going on to take the game 12-6.With the loss the Argos fall to 34-17 overall and will now have to battle a tough road to a conference championship. They will take on Alabama-Huntsville in at 9:30 a.m. CT in an elimination game.For more information on Argonaut athletics or to follow along with live stats, fans can keep up with the action at www.GoArgos.com.Print Friendly Version Photo courtesy of Kim Hastings Sharecenter_img Argos Fall 12-6 to North Alabama in Game Two of GSC Tournamentlast_img read more

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