Broadway performances suspended for the rest of the year

first_imgBecause of Covid-19, the industry is weighing how to implement “screening and testing, cleaning and sanitizing, wayfinding inside theaters, backstage protocols and much more.”Charlotte St. Martin, the League’s president, told the Times she was “cautiously optimistic” about protocols the industry was developing.“As long as they hold up, I do think that after the first of the year, a rolling rollout of shows reopening is possible,” she said.Broadway shows were halted on March 12, before the state shutdown was implemented on March 22.Of the 31 shows that were running, the Disney musical, “Frozen,” Edward Albee’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf,” and the Martin McDonagh play, “Hangmen,” have all said they will not return to the stage after Broadway reopens.The pandemic has frozen New York City’s travel industry, leading hotels and other tourism-dependent businesses to suffer. The loss of tourism alone could drain the city of $1.8 billion in tax revenue from hotels, according to a recent report. [NYT] — Sylvia Varnham O’Regan This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Now Broadway’s Imperial Theatre (Getty)For theatre lovers waiting to get tickets to Broadway’s most in-demand shows, the wait just got even longer.The Broadway League announced Monday that theatres will remain closed until at least the end of 2020, with some uncertainty over when shows will reopen. People who have tickets for performances up to January 3 will receive refunds, according to the New York Times.“Returning productions are currently projected to resume performances over a series of rolling dates in early 2021,” the League, a national trade association, said in a statement.The news comes after Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced last week that gyms, malls and movie theaters would remain closed past the state’s fourth phase of reopening. New York City is currently in phase 2, which allows for outdoor dining and real estate services to resume.Read moreHere’s what won’t reopen in New York’s phase 4Hotel distress could strip NYC of $1.8B in tax revenuelast_img read more

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City governments effective because they ‘have to get things done,’ says Sly James in Prairie Village talk

first_imgBrian Ellison, left, and Sly James participated in the first Village Talk event at Village Presbyterian Wednesday.In a wide ranging talk in Prairie Village Wednesday, Kansas City, Mo., Mayor Sly James touched on everything from the role of cities in American life and how elected officials can work effectively together to the intersection of race relations and policing.The discussion was the first of Village Presbyterian Church’s new Village Talk series, a program of live conversations exploring “the intersection of faith and values, religion and public affairs, social issues and the common good.” The series is hosted by parish Associate Rev. Brian Ellison, a contributor to KCUR.Discussing his role as mayor, James said cities are widely viewed as more efficient than state and federal governments because “we don’t care about all this ideological nonsense. We have to get things done.”“At the state level and the federal level, it’s party against party. Even common sense solutions fail if they don’t meet the party criteria,” he said.While much of the talk revolved around duties as the head of Kansas City government, James also touched on a number of deeply personal topics, including the foundational experiences he had as a child that formed his current beliefs, and how those beliefs influence his views of race relations, policing, education and more in his current role.James described a childhood in the middle of the century that straddled the line between white and black Kansas City communities that rarely intersected. His parents moved the family from Wyandotte County to Kansas City, Mo., and converted them to Catholicism when James was around 9 years old so that the children could attend parochial schools.Education, he said, was something his family believed was worth making tough choices for. James attended a high school that was almost entirely white and lived in a neighborhood that was almost entirely black.“That made me less popular in both places than I would have liked to have been,” he said. “But it also gave me an education about the fact that the stereotypes that were drilled into my head around the neighborhood about white people were not true.”Today, he said, he feels passionately that people need to get to know each other on a one-on-one level before they make judgments. Having an interracial family underscores the point.“My wife is white. My kids are mixed,” he said. “It’s very hard for us to figure out who to be prejudiced against.”At one point in the evening, James said the Kansas City area faces a number of challenges, and that societal problems aren’t confined to Kansas City proper. He noted that many payday loan operations, what he described as one of the “scourges of society,” are headquartered here in Johnson County.“What they do to people and families is horrible,” he said. “But when they have the money to buy politicians, they’re never going to stop.”The next Village Talk will feature Time Magazine editor-at-large David von Drehle on Wednesday, Feb. 11. University of Kansas Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little will be the guest April 8, and KCUR host Steve Kraske will be the guest May 13.last_img read more

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Liberty Property Trust to Begin Redevelopment of Newly Acquired Industrial Building

first_imgLiberty Property Trust announced it will begin redevelopment and renovation of a newly acquired industrial building at 2626 S. 7th St. in Phoenix.The property is located within minutes of Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport and the company has rebranded the property, which it purchased in September, “Liberty Sky Harbor Center.”Work will begin in January 2013 and is expected to be complete in 2Q 2013.“The redevelopment of Liberty Sky Harbor Center comes at a time when interest is high in well-located, efficient industrial space,” said John DiVall, senior vice president and city manager for Liberty’s Arizona region.“This is more than a face lift; it’s a repositioning of the property that will be attractive for potential tenants seeking a cross dock warehouse building with expansive outside area in the Sky Harbor International Airport submarket, which is virtually non-existent today.”DiVall said he anticipates the work will begin with the demolition of a smaller office building on the east end of the property. That area is slated for an expansive parking area for trailers and outside storage.New dock doors will be installed along the south side of the building with a new concrete truck court on the south side of the property as well. The existing fencing will be relocated back to the property line on the south and southwest sides of the property and high efficiency exterior site lighting will be added.Work on the building itself will include the installation of additional dock doors on the south, east and west sides of the building and new asphalt throughout the property. Improvements will also include energy efficiency steps such as a complete roof overlay, new R-11 insulation to be added to the underside of the roof deck, native landscaping for water conservation and the use of low-VOC paint on the interior and exterior.Liberty purchased the property this fall from Emerik Properties Corp. The seller was represented by Jerry McCormick of CBRE and Liberty was represented by Bob Crum of Ross Brown Partners, who will also have the leasing assignment. The general contractor for the project is Howard S. Wright.Liberty owns approximately 2 MSF of industrial and office space in Arizona. In addition to Liberty Cotton Center, major holdings include Liberty 303 Business Park in Goodyear, the LEED Gold 8501 E. Raintree Drive in Scottsdale and Liberty Tolleson Center.last_img read more

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