Yvonne Sutherlin

first_imgYvonne Sutherlin passed away peacefully on August 3, 2020.She was born on October 5, 1930, in Port Arthur, Texas and was a lifelong resident.She was preceded in death by her parents, Mary S. Aaron and Jewell C. Aaron; her younger sister, Shirley F. Williams; her loving husband of 55 years James E. Sutherlin; and her son James A. Sutherlin. Next UpYvonne graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School in 1949 and later graduated from Lamar University with an Associate’s degree in Paralegal Studies.She retired from the City of Port Arthur in 1992 with 31 years of public service as an Administrative Assistant.She was extremely involved in her community and loved to travel, bake and play the piano. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to the Museum of the Gulf Coast, 700 Procter Street, Port Arthur, TX 77640 or Friends of the Port Arthur Public Library, 3601 Cultural Center Drive, Port Arthur, TX 77640.center_img She is survived by daughter ‘Beth’ Anne Coakley (Ron) of Bedford, TX, daughter in law Lynne Lange, son David Sutherlin (Annie) of Tyler, TX; four grandchildren, Lynn Jones (Andy), Aaron Sutherlin (Molly), Erin Silmon (Keith), Kendall Sutherlin, and 6 great-grandchildren.Visitation for family and friends will be at 10:00 a.m., Friday, August 14, 2020 at First Christian Church with a memorial service to begin at 11:00 a.m. followed by the burial at Greenlawn Memorial Park.last_img read more

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Straightpoint partners with Onursan

first_imgThe Istanbul-based company is a specialist supplier to the marine safety industry. According to Straightpoint, the partnership represents Onursan’s entry into the modern load cell marketplace, having previously only offered analogue and dated digital technologies.Barbaros Onur, general coordinator at Onursan, said: “Reliable force measurement technology is becoming increasingly important to our customers, who work in the hazardous marine environment. We have experimented with alternative measuring products to complete load tests, for example, but we have experienced problems. The reputed quality and durability of Straightpoint’s portfolio, therefore, appealed to us.”Onur expects the products to be used with cargo cranes, winches, and periodic testing of launching equipment as well as other safety installations onboard vessels.In addition to its headquarters in Istanbul, Onursan has facilities in Izmir. www.straightpoint.comwww.onursan.netlast_img read more

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Colorado may end its unique ban on rain barrels

first_imgDENVER | Colorado’s only-in-the-nation ban on backyard rain barrels is getting a new look from state lawmakers.The state House gave preliminary approval Friday to a bill allowing homeowners to use up to two 55-gallon rain barrels. “This puts the water user in the mindframe of preservation,” said one of the bill’s sponsors, Rep. Jessie Danielson, D-Wheat Ridge.This Sears home rain barrel system, sold and used in Colorado, may be legal if a state law passes. Currently, it’s illegal to store rainwater anywhere in ColoradoColorado’s rain-barrel ban is little known and widely flouted, with rain barrels for sale at many home-gardening stores and commonly used by home gardeners. But the barrels technically violate Colorado water law, which says that people don’t own the water that runs on or through their property. They can use the water, but they can’t keep it.Sponsors of the rain-barrel bill say the barrels don’t violate water law as long as homeowners are required to use the water outdoors on their own property. Homeowners aren’t taking the water, just holding onto it for a short time.“Right now we’re making Coloradans criminals” for using the barrels, said another supporter, Rep. Lori Saine, R-Dacono.But the measure sparked a spirited opposition from other Republicans, who warned the change violates Colorado’s complicated water law.Colorado is a major supplier of water to the American Southwest, which relies on runoff from the Rocky Mountain snows. The slightest changes to water policy in Colorado can have major consequences downstream.“Everything is not always as simple as it seems,” warned Rep. Don Coram, R-Montrose.Coram held up a coffee mug belonging to Saine and asked whether he should be allowed to keep it just because he wants it.“You can never own the water,” Coram said. “It’s not your water; it belongs to the people of Colorado.”The bill faces one more formal vote before heading to the Senate.Colorado’s law banning rain barrels was amended in 2009 to allow rain-barrel use by people with their own wells, but the change didn’t apply to municipal water users.___Online:House Bill 1259: https://bit.ly/1I60dGxlast_img read more

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