Reading joins the contactless revolution

first_imgReading Buses has started to accept contactless bankcards for tickets payments on its Greenwave services.A major innovation with Reading’s system, developed with its ticketing system
supplier Ticketer, is that it is using a single card-reader for contactless, smartcard and
concessionary fare pass transactions.Most other operators have to deploy a second card reader to accept contactless payments.The prestigious Greenwave route, run with gas powered buses connects Central Reading with Green Park, the Madejski Stadium park and ride, Reading International Business Park, Tesco Depot and Kennet Island.The buses have been fitted with upgraded card readers and loaded with new software, to accept Visa, MasterCard and Maestro cards.It is a first for the municipal operator, one of the few to still operate an exact-fare-only policy on many routes, although change is given on the Greenwave services.Says CEO Martijn Gilbert: “It is envisaged that the rest of our network can be contactless-enabled soon.“This is the first version of our contactless strategy and will work in a ‘retail model’
where the customer asks for the fare/product first, then presents their card and the ‘pay by
card’ option is selected by the driver.”Transactions will work in the same way as
 Reading Buses existing ‘e-purse’ smartcards.Over the year ahead it “will be seeking to move towards a ‘tapping’-based
model” for flat fares in the simply Reading zone.“The ‘retail model’ is the first starting point and 
is on a par with other contactless card schemes now going live on other bus networks across the
UK outside of London,” adds Mr Gilbert.last_img read more

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EZ-IO Gains Popularity; Public Still Wary

first_imgST. PAUL, Minn. — A new battery-powered drill is helping paramedics save lives, but it also might be scaring patients. The handheld device makes injecting fluids and drugs quicker during many high-stress emergencies. It s unfamiliar to patients and bystanders, though, so one emergency medical services official is hoping to spread the word about it. It s important that people understand this, before a medic takes out this Black and Decker-looking thing and they wonder, What in the hell are you doing? said Dr. R.J. Frascone, medical director of emergency medical services for Regions Hospital in St. Paul. Frascone said the drill is gradually becoming a first choice because it s easy and fast. VidaCare, the Texas manufacturer, now counts 1,800 EMS units in the U.S. that use the drill. Medical units in Iraq and Afghanistan are using it more frequently in trauma situations as well. This device can be the difference between life and death, Frascone said. The EZ-IO is but one device in the competitive IO market. WaisMed, also in Texas, sells a spring-loaded gun that lodges a port directly into the bone marrow. Some medics during his study were pushing on the drill too hard, or pulling on it and preventing the needle and port from locking into the bone. When done properly, EMS officials said the drill creates a secure connection that doesn t get jostled when patients are moved and transported to hospitals. There is a learning curve, however, Frascone said. The traditional method of administering drugs and fluids is called intravenous, or IV, which means inside the vein. The drill uses a different pathway called intraosseous, or IO, which means inside the bone. Either method can be used to administer life-saving drugs such as epinephrine, which boosts the heart rate. Regions EMS has been involved in early use and research of the so-called EZ-IO, which drills a needle through a soft spot below the knee and creates a port through which medics can inject and withdraw fluids. It s typically used on patients in cardiac arrest or shock, and only then after medics are unable to manually thread needles into the veins in their hands or arms.center_img Lilja agreed the device is becoming a first choice for patients in cardiac arrest, because their inactive veins recede and become difficult for paramedics to find. Patients with diabetes often have hidden veins as well. It s like putting a sheet metal screw in a wall, said Dr. Pat Lilja, medical director for North Memorial s emergency medical services. The thing looks like a drill. The company calls it a driver, but it s a drill. However, each disposable needle for the drill costs more than $90, so both the Regions and North Memorial medics are told to use them only when necessary. Now, some EMS units nationally try IV lines first and switch to the IO drills if they can t find a vein within 30 or 60 seconds. Others use the drills first for cardiac arrest patients. Frascone said his medics use their own discretion, but must make quick decisions and not waste precious seconds. Frascone recently demonstrated on an uncooked chicken leg, drilling into the bone and then leaving behind the inserted needle and port. It took less than 10 seconds. Research studies have shown that medics in the field can use it and have drugs flowing into patients within 60 seconds. Before these devices existed, medics had fewer options when they couldn t find veins through which to insert IV lines, Frascone said. There were hand-powered IO needles, but they lacked precision and required medics to use considerable force. Regions in St. Paul wasn t involved in the development or initial federal trials that permitted the device s use, but its medics did a small research study using the EZ-IO and a competing drill called the FAST-1. The medics were more precise with the EZ-IO, using it correctly in 86 percent of attempts, according to results published this summer. That s not the way to approach these patients, Frascone said, because they re dying. Jeremy Olson can be reached at [email protected] or 651-228-5583.last_img read more

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Risk-based capital

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by. Anthony DemangoneSure, leadership is about communicating clearly, creating a vision and motivating your colleagues to reach their full potential.But sometimes, it is about recognizing when your credit union or the industry is driving into a buzz-saw.At NAFCU, we think that’s about to happen with NCUA’s Risk-Based Capital proposal.Here’s a link to NCUA’s proposal.Here’s a link to NAFCU’s Risk-Based Capital resource page.NAFCU’s RBC Talking Points – great if you are preparing your own comment letter, or if you want an overview of our concerns.Here are the comment letters already received by NCUA.What’s the big deal? The proposal would revise the risk-weights for many of NCUA’s current asset classifications and require higher minimum levels of capital for many credit unions with concentrations of assets in real estate loans, MBLs or higher levels of delinquent loans. It even would allow NCUA to require a credit union to hold higher levels of risk-based capital based on “supervisory concerns.”If the risk-weights are wrong, which NAFCU believes they are, credit unions will needlessly waste valuable capital. For example, under the proposal, non-delinquent first mortgage real estate loans start at a 50 percent risk-weight for those loans that represent less than 25% of a credit union’s assets, then jumps to 75 percent for those from 25-35% of assets, and finally goes all the way to 100 percent for those that comprise more than 35% of the assets of the credit union’s portfolio. (Compare this to the FDIC, which weights non-delinquent first mortgage real estate loans at 50 percent, regardless of concentration.) continue reading »last_img read more

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Letter

first_img Letter Conflict Counsel I take exception to the implication that the Florida Legislature is forced to create another level of government because conflict counsel costs have skyrocketed as a result of attorney greed. Wait a minute. The November 1 News story “Lawsuit delays conflict counsel facilities request” represented that Jeff Lewis, regional counsel for the First District, knows one Florida lawyer is (was) making more than $576,000 a year on conflict cases.Assuming counsel is billing at a rate of $100 per hour, I calculate he is billing 15.5 hours a day, 365 days a year. Are you kidding me? The legislature believes it is forced to create another bureaucracy because our profession cannot be trusted or restrained? More government is not the answer. Shameful. This is what our legislators think? With this perception, nothing less than our profession is at stake.I know many fine, efficient, and caring attorneys who accepted criminal conflict and child dependency cases. Most do so at half or less than half their normal hourly rate. No government can be as efficient as these honest, hardworking, and caring individuals. The problem is obvious, so is the solution. Michael R. Reiter Lynn Haven Letter December 15, 2007 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Antigua Establishes Regional Travel Bubble – CARICOM Business News

first_img Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC Oct 16, 2020 St. Lucia records more cases of COVID Oct 16, 2020 Oct 15, 2020 CARICOM-Business-10-July-2020Download CARICOM-Business-10-July-2020 Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak center_img Oct 15, 2020 More deaths from COVID-19 recorded in CARICOM countries,… You may be interested in… Please see the latest edition of the CARICOM Business newsletter which comprises information culled from news entities in the Caribbean and beyond and includes a Foreign Exchange Summary, a Stock Exchange Summary and International Oil Prices. Visitors to Jamaica, Antigua and Barbuda to be tested for COVID-19 – CARICOM Business NewsPlease see the latest edition of the CARICOM Business newsletter which comprises information culled from news entities in the Caribbean and beyond and includes a Foreign Exchange Summary, a Stock Exchange Summary and International Oil Prices. CARICOM-Business-12-June-2020DownloadJune 15, 2020In “Agriculture”Number portability for Antigua and Barbuda – CARICOM Business NewsPlease see the latest edition of the CARICOM Business newsletter which comprises information culled from news entities in the Caribbean and beyond and includes a Foreign Exchange Summary, a Stock Exchange Summary and International Oil Prices. CARICOM Business 23 November, 2018November 26, 2018In “Barbados”Antigua and Barbuda to sell 10% stake in WIOC – CARICOM Business NewsPlease see the latest edition of the CARICOM Business newsletter which comprises information culled from news entities in the Caribbean and beyond and includes a Foreign Exchange Summary, a Stock Exchange Summary and International Oil PricesOctober 29, 2019In “Agriculture”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

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