Kozol campaigns for educational reform

first_imgAt times as he spoke in the Memorial Church last Thursday (Sept. 20) Jonathan Kozol, educator, activist, and author, sounded more fervent than an impassioned man of God preaching eternal salvation.“I’m 71 years old; I’m too old to bite my tongue. … I intend to keep on fighting in this struggle ’til my dying day,” he said.But the salvation that Kozol was advocating was for the public school system in the United States, a system that, in his view, requires, if not divine intervention, at least a drastic overhaul.In an appearance co-sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s (HGSE) Askwith Education Forum, the Cambridge Forum and the Harvard Book Store, Kozol discussed his new book “Letters to a Young Teacher,” a series of letters he wrote to “Francesca” a “glorious, excited, glowing, first-grade teacher” at an inner-city school in Boston. Through the correspondence, the book examines topics Kozol has addressed throughout his career, but focuses in part on the fairly recent “No Child Left Behind” legislation, a bundle of requirements that he argues kill the ability of children to learn and develop through their own curiosity.The law, passed in 2001, requires, among other things, that all students in primary and secondary schools perform at grade level in reading and math by 2014. It mandates greater school accountability and includes punitive measures for those schools that fall short. Kozol contends that the law disproportionately affects inner-city schools and drives away promising young teachers by forcing them to use a scripted curriculum that only prepares students to take tests and not actually engage and learn.He claimed that the law was “created as a shaming ritual by which to discredit the entire concept of our public schools by holding up impossible demands without the funds to pay for them.”Kozol graduated from Harvard in 1958 and was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to Magdalen College, Oxford. In 1964 he took a job as a teacher in a public school in Roxbury, which led to his book “Death at an Early Age: The Destruction of the Hearts and Minds of Negro Children in the Boston Public Schools.” The work received the National Book Award in Science, Philosophy and Religion in 1968. He has written numerous books on the subject since.Recently, Kozol has spent a lot of time in Washington, D.C., urging the Democratic leadership in Congress to make what he calls “radical change” to No Child Left Behind in part by drastically reducing the amount of high-stakes testing. A vote to reauthorize the federal law is expected this fall, with the Bush administration pushing to broaden its scope. Kozol is also mobilizing teachers with Education Action, a network of educators whom he hopes will carry on his efforts. He encouraged people in the crowd to sign up.“I pray the young people will join in forces with us older guys,” he said. “Honestly … we need you to carry on.”To further his cause, the Boston native has been on a partial hunger strike since July and has lost 29 pounds. His slender frame and at times hoarse voice were evidence last week of the toll his fast has taken. He called the hunger strike a way to “keep faith with the kids who trusted me” and to promote his campaign for the need for sweeping change.At the beginning of his talk, Kozol asked those in the crowd who were teachers to raise their hands. The air was quickly filled with scores of arms, and a loud wave of applause acknowledging them echoed around the hall.“I always feel safer when I am in a room with teachers,” he said.What followed were his stories of the touching, silly, fascinating world of the children he met through his visits to Francesca’s classroom. He testified to the child’s ability to engage and blossom in the presence of a gifted, dedicated guide. But his lightness was punctuated by serious moments. His voice registered a grave tone as he warned of the impending doom of the country’s public education system should it remain, as he claims, broken by No Child Left Behind.During the questions that followed, Kozol encouraged dissent. Responding to one audience member, who asked how teachers and parents should oppose “moronic mandates,” he said they could simply boycott the tests as some communities have done.“I’d like to see more suburbs doing that because they can afford to take that risk,” he said.He also addressed his feelings toward Teach For America, an initiative designed to encourage a selective group of college graduates and professionals to teach in schools — often in urban areas — for two years. Kozol said the program was marred by the lack of teaching experience of its members.With its resultant high turnover rate and limited training, he contended, “it sort of like builds in instability in inner-city schools … and throws people into the classroom knowing nothing about children.”He urged new teachers who join the program to make “an inward promise to yourself that you are going to stay for seven years.”Many young teachers and students stood in a long line after the talk, waiting to have Kozol sign copies of “Letters to a Young Teacher.”“He really has a love and appreciation for kids and that comes through when he talks,” said Andy Shin, who is enrolled in HGSE’s School Leadership Program. “His voice reminds us what really is important, which is kids.”last_img read more

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Visteon Appoints Charles Mazur Jr. as Vice President, Investor Relations

first_imgWith more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  VAN BUREN TOWNSHIP, Mich. — Visteon Corp. has announced that Charles Mazur Jr. has joined the company as vice president, investor relations. Mazur, who has more than 17 years of investor relations and related experience, will be responsible for Visteon’s global investor relations program, managing relationships and communications with financial stakeholders and the broader financial community. He reports to William Quigley, executive vice president and CFO.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Mazur most recently was vice president of investor relations and corporate communications for International Automotive Components (IAC). He previously served in investor relations, treasury and corporate strategy roles with several global companies. “Chuck is an accomplished investor relations professional who brings significant depth and experience to Visteon in this role,” said Quigley. “Having spent his career working with the capital markets and the investment community, Chuck is well-suited to further enhance our relationships with our valued investors.” Mazur has a bachelor of science degree in business administration from West Virginia University and a master’s degree in business administration from Duquesne University.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisementlast_img read more

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Cultural activities to headline Francophonie Month

first_img Tweet Director of the Alliance Francaise, Carol BogdanovsckyThe Alliance Francaise de la Dominique will stage two main cultural events as part of activities to commemorate Francophonie Month, celebrated annually in March.A contemporary dance show from Guadeloupe on Sunday March 9th and a theatrical play on March 24th at the Arawak House of Culture at a cost of EC$20.00 per ticket are the main events.The contemporary dance is a show, according to director of the Alliance Francaise Carol Bogdanovscky, questions the creole identity. The award-winning dance was born from an encounter between a choreographer and a stage designer, who created as a reflection of their life journey. It will commence at 8pm and tickets are available at the Arawak House of Culture as well as the Alliance Franciase.The theatrical play by deceased French writer, Aime Cesaire entitled “Notebook Of A Return To My Native Land” is the second cultural event which will commence from 7pm on Sunday, March 24th.Dr. Alwin BullyCesaire has been described as “one of the most important writers of the 21st Century” and a “true Caribbean person” by Dominican play writer Dr. Alwin Bully.“He was responsible for an entire movement basically which was called negritude in the years when he was studying in Paris…and sowed the seeds of the black power movement,” Dr. Bully noted.He also encouraged the youth and students to attend this play as it is a way for them to get exposure to theatrical plays.It will be performed by renowned French actor, Jacques Martial, and although spoken in French, there will be English subtitles displayed on a screen.Among other activities to mark Francophonie Month is an international food fair on Sunday March 17th at the Alliance Francaise. It being staged to “highlight food and cultural heritage between Dominica and France”, Ms. Bogdanovscky said.Among other activities to commemorate the month are French Day, an Exposition, Primary Schools French Festival and a Mademoiselle Francophonie pageant.Dominica Vibes News Sharing is caring! LocalNews Cultural activities to headline Francophonie Month by: – March 1, 2013 Sharecenter_img Share Share 19 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

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Clyde Roopchand laid to rest

first_imgFormer Chief Planner of the Finance Ministry, Clyde Roopchand, who has been hailed as a patriot andPersons solemnly pay their last respectsoutstanding public servant, was on Saturday laid to rest. Prime Minister Moses Nagamootoo, Foreign Affairs Minister Carl Greenidge, Junior Finance Minister Jaipaul Sharma and Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo were among those present at the funeral service, held outside of the Arthur Chung Convention Centre, Liliendaal, Greater Georgetown.Roopchand worked at the State Planning Secretariat and also sat on several Government boards. He was 70 years old and passed away in New York, USA.After his passing, the Ministry of the Presidency had said issued a simple statement which read: “President David Granger has expressed condolences to the wife and relatives of Mr Clyde Roopchand.”The People’s Progressive Party had also expressed their grief at the passing of the former public servant. “His passion and commitment to advance the country and the welfare of its people is undisputed.Guyana has indeed lost a stalwart and a true son. The best tribute would be to ensure that his contributions are not forgotten and the impeccable standards he set, be emulated,” the Party had noted.last_img read more

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