Winners and losers after 100 days of Theresa May

first_imgHistorically, the Treasury has been perhaps the most powerful government department. What the Chancellor wanted, he usually got. In May’s government, Chancellor Philip Hammond, a Remainer, has been a lonely voice arguing against a hard departure from the EU and the single market, and right now, he’s on the back foot.Big businessUnder previous governments, politicians were always at pains to stress that Britain was “open for business.” Prime ministers Gordon Brown and David Cameron appointed prominent businessmen to government roles. The financial industry (“the City”), accounting for about 11 percent of the U.K. economy, carried huge weight in Westminster.But in positioning herself as the champion of working people, May’s government has adopted a tone toward business giants that would have once seemed unthinkable from a Tory prime minister.But in positioning herself as the champion of working people, May’s government has adopted a tone toward business giants that would have once seemed unthinkable from a Tory prime minister.In her conference address this month, May took a dramatic new turn, setting out a populist, interventionist economic approach — cracking down on corporate tax avoidance, controlling energy prices – aimed at showing she would stand up for the little guy. LONDON — Friday marked 100 days since Theresa May replaced David Cameron as U.K. prime minister, taking control of a nation reeling from weeks of political turmoil after the Brexit referendum in June.“People voted for change. And change is going to come,” May told delegates at the Conservative Party conference in Birmingham earlier this month, as she charted a stark departure from her predecessor.Here are the winners and losers of May’s first 100 days. WinnersThe working classMay has pointedly tried to position herself as the champion of “ordinary, working-class families,” as she put it in her keynote speech at the annual party conference. Brexit, as she sees it, was a howl of distress by blue-collar voters who feel they’ve been overlooked by ruling elites. Capturing these voters, May believes, will broaden the Conservatives’ electoral appeal and take supporters from the Labour Party and UKIP.EuroskepticsThe prime minister voted to remain in the union but you wouldn’t necessarily know it from her subsequent rhetoric. May quickly adopted the language of the Euroskeptics, firmly insisting that Britain would leave the EU and that she wouldn’t abide any attempts to overturn or undermine the “will of the British people.”Now, the country seems on course for the “hard” break from the EU championed by Brexiteers. Euroskeptics are controlling the narrative, led by Brexit minister David Davis and abetted by cheerleaders in the right-wing press.David Davis arrives at Downing Street on July 13, 2016 in London, England | Jack Taylor/Getty ImagesLawyers and lobbyists Also On POLITICO Theresa May gets hard welcome from EU ‘nest of doves’ By Tom McTague Theresa May’s Brexit war cabinet By Tom McTague May’s government plans to introduce a “Great Repeal Bill” that will, in one fell swoop, transfer all European laws that the U.K. currently abides by onto the domestic statute books. The government will then, over time, pick through the tangled mess and amend unsuitable or unpopular laws. The big winners from that? Lawyers and lobbyists, already licking their lips in anticipation of years of hefty fees from companies and interest groups.Liberal DemocratsAll right, all right: it may be too soon to argue that we’re witnessing a Liberal Democrat revival. But the party’s performance in the by-election to replace David Cameron in the Witney constituency Thursday may be a sign of things to come.The Lib Dems slashed the Conservatives’ majority from around 25,000 to 5,700 after campaigning on a pro-European platform. With May taking a hard line on Brexit, there’s a clear opportunity for opposition parties to increase their support among the disgruntled 48 percent who voted to remain — and right now, the Lib Dems seem best-positioned.Nicola SturgeonThe Scottish National Party leader is the only party leader in the U.K. who projects the same air of competence and authority as the prime minister.center_img LosersThe 48 percentSince they woke up to a historic defeat on June 24, there hasn’t been much for the 16.1 million British citizens who voted to stay in the EU to be cheerful about.Early hopes for a second referendum faded after May’s government set the country on course for a hard exit. Those still making the case against a clean break are shouted down as “Bremoaners,” unwilling to accept the will of the people. Or as the Daily Mail put it in an editorial recently: “Whingeing. Contemptuous. Unpatriotic.”The PoundThe U.K. currency was trading at $1.22 late on Friday, down 17 percent since the vote to leave the EU.The Treasury  David CameronThursday’s election of a new Tory MP in the Witney constituency, which Cameron held from 2001 to 2016, underlined the former prime minister’s abrupt disappearance from the U.K.’s political scene. In her speech in Birmingham, May praised her predecessor’s achievements. In reality, her team moved swiftly and ruthlessly to rub out the Cameron regime.LabourThe opposition spent much of May’s first 100 days engrossed in a bitter leadership contest. With Jeremy Corbyn reaffirmed as leader last month, the party’s popularity continues to sink. According to an IPSOS Mori poll published Thursday, the Conservatives are now ahead by 18 points, with the backing of 47 percent of voters. That’s up seven points in a month — and the most since Gordon Brown was prime minister in 2009. UKIPBrexit should’ve been a populist moment of triumph. Instead, the party has fallen apart. Diane James, replacing Nigel Farage as the leader, lasted only 18 days before resigning. The frontrunner to replace her, Steven Woolfe, ended up in hospital after a confrontation with a colleague in the European Parliament, and he quit the party days later, saying it was “ungovernable.” The party’s support has sunk from a peak of 12 percent earlier this year to 6 percent, according to Thursday’s IPSOS Mori poll.MigrantsThere’s virtually unanimous agreement: the vote to Leave was a vote to control immigration. May has set down restriction of free movement of people as her red line in the Brexit negotiations. One way or another, she wants to reduce the number of people coming into the country.The National Health ServiceDespite Brexit promises, it turns out the NHS won’t get that extra £350 million a week, after all.last_img read more

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Three analytics tips to help customers grow their business

first_imgEvery business’ ultimate goal is to grow and increase profits. Business owners often underestimate the importance of analytics and struggle to get timely and measurable insights that drive the bottom line. As an important partner to small businesses, credit unions should take on the task of ensuring members are effectively using the tools available to them to track analytics. There are many factors that can influence the success of business on any given day, and data analytics should be top of mind for business owners so they can make informed decisions that will help them reach their goals.Education is key in launching an analytics program; these three tips will help you to better educate your members on how analytics can help their business succeed in the long-term:1.     Use Analytics to Grow BusinessNo one will know a particular company better than the business professionals running it. Even still, there are certain factors when it comes to consumer spending and member behavior that a business decision maker may not be able to identify. You can help by providing insights on how analytics can help them better understand the needs of members and anticipate member behavior. By defining which analytics make the most sense to track for their specific business, you can guide your members to use customized analytics to help their business grow.2.     Highlight Ease of UseNot everyone is a math wizard, and understanding detailed analytics can be a daunting task. Many small business owners become intimidated by the thought of analytics because they think the concept is too complicated to understand or their business isn’t complex enough to need analytics. However, modern business analytics can be understood easily and can provide businesses with meaningful insights. You can position yourself and your credit union as a go-to resource not only for financial issues, but business analytics as well. For members, the added support helps to drive home the important partnership they have developed with their credit union professional.3.     Showcase Availability and AccessibilityCloud-based, mobile and big data technologies have made it easier to access analytics. Prior to the more advanced technology that we use today, analytics solutions were set up for a specific company; however, the cloud has made it possible for analytics solutions to be more diverse and cater to many businesses. Today, business professionals can access essential information at any time from a computer or mobile device. This is an opportunity for you, as a credit union professional, to showcase your knowledge of the rapidly changing world of big data and make recommendations on analytics solutions that are both convenient and critically important to your customer’s business success.Business analytics are no longer restricted to the national chains, and credit unions can help educate their members by spreading the word. Small- and medium-size business owners can use analytics solutions that provide the same level of insights and valuable information as their larger competitors, and in turn, help grow their business in the long-term. 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Neal Korzekwinski Neal Korzekwinski is Senior Vice President of Strategic Partner Sales and Management at First Data, a global technology and payments processing company that serves more than six million merchant locations … Web: www.firstdata.com Detailslast_img read more

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Low prices force change at Strukton Rail

first_imgNETHERLANDS: ‘Prices in the market for renewals are under great pressure’, said Strukton Rail on October 19, announcing a reorganisation under which the company’s four regions will be reduced to two. Around 350 jobs are to go across the country, and Strukton has started negotiations with its staff and unions over the proposed redundancies. Noting that the company had invested considerable sums over the past five years to support a ‘substantial’ improvement in the quality of the Dutch rail network, Strukton Rail said new ‘output-oriented’ contracts for daily maintenance were characterised by low prices. It expressed concern about ‘the current situation in which quality becomes subordinate to price’.last_img

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