City governments effective because they ‘have to get things done,’ says Sly James in Prairie Village talk

first_imgBrian Ellison, left, and Sly James participated in the first Village Talk event at Village Presbyterian Wednesday.In a wide ranging talk in Prairie Village Wednesday, Kansas City, Mo., Mayor Sly James touched on everything from the role of cities in American life and how elected officials can work effectively together to the intersection of race relations and policing.The discussion was the first of Village Presbyterian Church’s new Village Talk series, a program of live conversations exploring “the intersection of faith and values, religion and public affairs, social issues and the common good.” The series is hosted by parish Associate Rev. Brian Ellison, a contributor to KCUR.Discussing his role as mayor, James said cities are widely viewed as more efficient than state and federal governments because “we don’t care about all this ideological nonsense. We have to get things done.”“At the state level and the federal level, it’s party against party. Even common sense solutions fail if they don’t meet the party criteria,” he said.While much of the talk revolved around duties as the head of Kansas City government, James also touched on a number of deeply personal topics, including the foundational experiences he had as a child that formed his current beliefs, and how those beliefs influence his views of race relations, policing, education and more in his current role.James described a childhood in the middle of the century that straddled the line between white and black Kansas City communities that rarely intersected. His parents moved the family from Wyandotte County to Kansas City, Mo., and converted them to Catholicism when James was around 9 years old so that the children could attend parochial schools.Education, he said, was something his family believed was worth making tough choices for. James attended a high school that was almost entirely white and lived in a neighborhood that was almost entirely black.“That made me less popular in both places than I would have liked to have been,” he said. “But it also gave me an education about the fact that the stereotypes that were drilled into my head around the neighborhood about white people were not true.”Today, he said, he feels passionately that people need to get to know each other on a one-on-one level before they make judgments. Having an interracial family underscores the point.“My wife is white. My kids are mixed,” he said. “It’s very hard for us to figure out who to be prejudiced against.”At one point in the evening, James said the Kansas City area faces a number of challenges, and that societal problems aren’t confined to Kansas City proper. He noted that many payday loan operations, what he described as one of the “scourges of society,” are headquartered here in Johnson County.“What they do to people and families is horrible,” he said. “But when they have the money to buy politicians, they’re never going to stop.”The next Village Talk will feature Time Magazine editor-at-large David von Drehle on Wednesday, Feb. 11. University of Kansas Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little will be the guest April 8, and KCUR host Steve Kraske will be the guest May 13.last_img read more

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Arnett’s Fabian Reid hits form

first_imgAfter taking some time to find his goalscoring form this season, last season’s runner-up in the Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL) scorer’s race, Fabian Reid, has found his scoring boots this campaign and has climbed to the top of the charts with 11 goals. Reid netted one goal in his team’s 3-1 win over Tivoli Gardens in their west Kingston derby last Sunday. Reid finished with 16 goals last campaign, one goal behind top scorer Craig Foster, and after outscoring fellow golden boot challenger Colorado Murray, who came into their contest tied on 10 goals, Reid assumed the leadership of the scoring table with seven rounds of matches to go. But Reid said that his slow start to the season was a result of defenders and teams paying him more attention. However, he said that he has never lost focus or his determination and that his continued hard work is now bearing fruit. The striker has scored in three of his team’s last four matches. STRONG DEFENSIVE TACTICS “This season, defenders are marking me a lot more. They are not giving me any chance because they know how dangerous I am. But I just continue to work until I find it (form), and it’s coming on now. I was the goal man for Arnett Gardens last season, and now that I got back my form, I am just looking to get the job done,” he said. Coincidentally, Reid and Arnett Gardens have hit form around the same time, and he says that it usually goes hand-in-hand. “This is our time of the season now, and our form is coming around, so we have to make the most of it, and from I am scoring, the team is going to be up. “We have seven games to go, and if we win those seven games, we can finish second or first. So we can still reach first. We just have to continue working hard as last year is last year, and we don’t want to live in the past,” he said. Reid was disappointed after letting the scoring title slip from his grasp last season, but with seven games to go, plus the play-offs, he believes that he can hold on and take the award this term. “I am looking to get about 20 goals this season, and if I can get 20 goals, that would be all right. Yes, I am looking to get the top scorer award as last year I slipped up, but I am not living in the past. I am working to do it this season,” he said. Reid leads the goalscoring chart with 11 goals, followed by Colorado Murray and Tremaine Stewart on 10 and Rondee Smith and Deshane Beckford with nine. [email protected]last_img read more

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South Carolina Corn and Soybean Association Flood Resource Guide

first_imgWhat should my first step be? Per USDA, producers with coverage through the federal crop insurance program should contact their crop insurance agent. What if I’m not covered by crop insurance?The 2014 Farm Bill provides several programs regardless of participation in the federal crop insurance program. Farmers looking to explore disaster assistance options available to them should contact their county FSA office. The point of contact at the South Carolina state FSA office is Kenn Jameson, at 803-806-3820 ext. 107 or [email protected] A listing of the South Carolina FSA, NRCS and Rural Development offices can be found by clicking here. Farmers with questions should also contact their county Clemson Extension office, which can be found here.What exactly does the farm bill provide?Clemson Extension has compiled a package of information on the programs available to farmers, which can be downloaded here. This packet begins with the South Carolina Department of Agriculture’s (SCDA) Disaster Assessment Form, and contains factsheets on many of the programs available to South Carolina farmers. Per USDA, programs available to farmers include the following:Livestock Indemnity ProgramEmergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish ProgramEmergency Forest Restoration ProgramTree Assistance ProgramEmergency Conservation Program (Funding and technical assistance for farmers and ranchers to rehabilitate farmland damaged by natural disasters)Emergency loans (Primary or contiguous disaster designation counties only)Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (Protects non-insurable crops against natural disasters)Environmental Quality Incentives Program (Financial assistance to repair and prevent excessive soil erosion)Emergency Watershed Protection Program (Funds recovery efforts like debris removal and streambank stabilization)What is the current status of our disaster designation?As of October 5, the following counties are covered under a presidential disaster declaration: Berkley, Charleston, Clarendon, Dorchester, Georgetown, Horry, Lexington, Orangeburg, Richland, Sumter, and Williamsburg. That federal register notice can be found here. The area is still awaiting an agricultural disaster designation from USDA Secretary Vilsack, but that request has been made.Per FSA, the county crop-loss threshold needed to qualify for an agricultural disaster declaration by USDA is 30 percent. The request for such a designation can come officially from Governor Haley’s office, but your congressional delegation can be a great help in moving that effort along. Regardless of the level of loss in your county (but especially if you’re above that 30 percent threshold), contact with Senators Graham and Scott, as well as your Member of Congress, is a very helpful first step toward ensuring that the Washington delegation of South Carolina lawmakers knows what this flooding will mean for Carolina farmers. Contact information for the agriculture staffer in each office is as follows: Rep. Jim ClyburnSC-6Lin Whitehouse202-225-3315 Sen. Lindsey GrahamSENJessica-Phillips Tyson202-224-5972 Rep. Mick MulvaneySC-5Moutray McLaren202-225-5501 What other resources are out there for me?Clemson Extension has compiled its news on the flooding, as well as its resources for farmers here.A listing of the South Carolina FSA, NRCS and Rural Development offices can be found by clicking here.Farmers with questions should also contact their county Clemson Extension office, which can be found here.Sen. Scott’s Flood Information page is here.Additional resources available to farmers include:Emergency Hay Exchange: For farmers also raising livestock, Clemson Extension is housing an emergency hay exchange for farmers in need. A listing of donor contact information, forage type and bale size can be found by clicking here.Flood Insurance and Credit: Clemson Extension has a fact sheet on the various options available to those impacted by floods here.Hurricane Insurance: While it remains to be seen if the flooding will be considered a result of Hurricane Joaquin, Clemson Extension houses a fact sheet on filing insurance claims (also likely a good how-to with regard to crop insurance claims) here.Timber Impact: For growers also in the timber industry, Clemson Extension has a briefing on impacts to forestry here.Pre-Harvest Safety Inspection: The South Carolina Department of Agriculture and Clemson Extension has staffed up its crop lab and is providing free sampling for contaminants in crops submerged in floodwaters. Additionally, SDCA is providing testing services for mold and mycotoxin in feed and hay as a result of flooding. Contact SCDA at 803-734-2210, or your county Clemson Extension office here for more on that program.More generally, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) operates a web portal through which Carolinians can apply for disaster assistance. That resource is available here. Governor Haley and the state’s Emergency Management Division (SCEMD) operates a similar portal here. Additionally, you may contact SCDA in Columbia at 803-734-2210. Sen. Tim ScottSENSpencer Pederson202-224-6121 Rep. Jeff DuncanSC-3David Jackson202-225-5301 Rep. Tom RiceSC-7Courtney Titus202-225-9895 Rep. Joe WilsonSC-2Taylor Andreae202-225-2452 Rep. Mark SanfordSC-1Roger Morse202-225-3176 Rep. Trey GowdySC-4Anna Bartlett202-225-6030last_img read more

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