Florida EMS Training Criticized

first_imgMANATEE, Fla. — Chaos reigned on Halloween night after an SUV drove through a dead-end street and crashed into a Bradenton retention pond. The victims’ family and friends turned on the paramedics. There was a tense exchange near the pond, and Jones reportedly broke down in tears that night. Some classes offered by the Coast Guard cost about $100, although more specialized courses such as one offered by Dive Rescue International cost about $900. “Publicly, we would have praised him as a hero if he went in there and saved someone,” Leinhauser said. “But privately, he would have been in some trouble.” After a heated town hall meeting with the victims’ relatives, EMS officials vowed to give their paramedics better equipment such as a “throw rope” used to pull victims to shore. The cost of training is not an issue in Charlotte, said department spokeswoman Dee Hawkins. Jones could not be reached, and the county attorney’s office must sign off on any interviews he gives because of the potential of a lawsuit, Leinhauser said. In 2005, the city of Bradenton was sued by the family of a 33-year-old man who drowned in August 2004 while officers stood on the shore. But people who knew the Halloween accident victims Johnnie Schoolfield Jr., 25, and Theo Thomas, 22 just want to know: Why were the paramedics not trained or equipped to handle such an emergency? “He did everything the way he was supposed to,” Leinhauser said of Jones. But Jones’ decision not to attempt a rescue was made “by the book,” according to his supervisor, Capt. Larry Leinhauser of the Manatee County Emergency Communication Center. In Sarasota County, Assistant Fire Chief Paul Dezzi said that some paramedics are trained for water rescues and other emergencies, but primarily are used for routine medical calls. Two men from the vehicle were in the water, calling for help. As it sank, neighbors rushed over and dialed 911. Just as paramedics are not expected to run into burning buildings like firefighters would, they are not expected to jump into a pond if they are not trained in water rescue, Leinhauser said. A Manatee Emergency Medical Services lieutenant, Mark Jones, heard the call and sped to the scene; he was the first public official there. In that case, however, the officers seem to be backed by the Florida Supreme Court. There is case law that suggests emergency workers have no obligation to save a life, and a 1985 ruling indicates that government agency employees have no “duty” to save a life. But in a county with a Gulf of Mexico coastline, rivers, swamps, lakes and hundreds of retention ponds, the drownings in late October were not the first time public officials were criticized for not doing more to save someone. But after speaking with the paramedics, Poole returned with others to the pond. She noticed how murky the water was, how deep it seemed, how few lights were there and how far the vehicle must have been from the shore. Experts and local officials agree that a “gut instinct” can be a dangerous thing, especially in water rescues. At the vigil, blows were exchanged, police were called and the women ran away. Besides, he said, accidents like the one near Southeast High School are “so infrequent that it would not make sense.” His family sued, claiming the officers were negligent. Fegan’s family would not comment because the case is unresolved. When the ropes were announced at a town hall meeting in November, some people close to the family were happy to see even a small measure of change. Both men from the SUV drowned. When two Bradenton police officers arrived at the Manatee River that day, Edward Fegan was incoherent and bobbing in the water.center_img It seems like a simple matter, that people have a moral or civic duty to save someone’s life, especially if they are a police officer, paramedic or firefighter. It had been a bitter aftermath. At the meeting, Schoolfield’s mother, Joann Monts, accused the paramedics of watching the men “suffer.” Still, Manatee EMS officials are adamant that they will stick to emergency medicine instead of water rescues. Jones did not go into the water to help, and took no other action in an attempt to save the man. Neither did the ambulance crew that arrived next. When the neighbors tried to jump in, the paramedics held them back. But two months later, the woman who organized the meeting between officials and the family has taken a new view of the drownings. This sort of “cross-training” is embraced elsewhere in Southwest Florida, but Leinhauser said there is a reluctance to train paramedics in anything but their primary medical duties. Patrice Poole, who is friends with some of the family members and has worked in Palmetto, where they lived, to develop similar community forums, was as confused as everyone else. “I would love to talk,” said his mother, Elva. “Someday I will.” By then, one man had drowned. The other was alive, thrashing in the pond. There was a fight at a candlelight vigil for Thomas and Schoolfield, as their friends tried to attack two women believed to be riding in the vehicle who swam to safety and then fled the scene. Fegan eventually drowned. He was 20 feet away, but neither officer swam after him, according to the suit. But experts in the field of emergency response say it is more complicated than that, and that by trying improperly to save one life a paramedic could endanger even more. The same is true in Charlotte County, where eight staffers are trained as “firemedics” and can be called on to administer life-saving drugs, fight fires or pull someone from the water. The Florida Highway Patrol, which is investigating the accident, has not released its findings yet. “Don’t become part of the problem,” said Robert C. Krause, a paramedic and industry consultant. “That’s the first rule. If he goes in the water and something happens, now you have two victims.” While most paramedics in Southwest Florida are not specifically trained for water rescues, some are. These jack-of-all-trades first responders are given special training in different areas. In fact, had Jones or other paramedics dived in, they could have faced disciplinary action for violating a county policy that says paramedics should not act beyond their training, Leinhauser said. But in Manatee, officials are stopping short of the more extensive training that Sarasota and Charlotte counties provide for their EMS workers. There, some staffers are trained not just to treat injuries and administer medicine, they are prepared to attempt rescues at fires or in potential drownings. Jones and other Manatee EMS employees are not trained in water rescue, and did not have the proper equipment, such as a rope or flotation device, with them to attempt a rescue, Leinhauser said. “I went back and began to understand what the paramedics were up against,” she said. “At first, I questioned it. I wanted to know why they didn’t do more. But the deaths of Schoolfield and Thomas did result in some changes. Every department vehicle will be equipped with “throw ropes” or flotation devices, and paramedics will be heading soon to a Bradenton field to learn the right way to throw them. “But it was dark, the water was murky, they were far away. They had to make a fast decision. I don’t think you can blame them for this.”last_img read more

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Fouls and low depth stop Gophers comeback attempt in NCAA tournament

first_imgThe Blue Raiders guard said after the game that his team was able to easily score on Minnesota.“I felt like this was the perfect time for me to step up,” Upshaw said. “Shoulder the offense and try to get everybody else going. Pitino admitted that depth was a significant problem for the team.The team was already low on depth after senior guard Akeem Springs suffered a torn Achilles in the Big Ten tournament.In the second half, the Gophers’ leading scorer, Nate Mason, suffered a hip injury but still played a majority of the second half.He was forced to leave Mason in even as the guard was injured and in the middle of one his worst offensive performances all season. Mason finished the game 2-10 on field goal attempts but played 38 of 40 minutes in Thursday’s loss.“We were not very deep late in the season and that caught up to us,” Pitino said. “When you can’t sub, [it’s] really, really hard because [Mason] needed a break.”Except for Michael Hurt, who played three minutes, every Gophers player finished with one or more foul.Lynch, Murhpy and Curry ended the game with four fouls each.After the game, Blue Raiders head coach Kermit Davis said getting Minnesota’s big men into foul trouble early was key.“Foul trouble affected us a lot,” Murphy said.“[It] may have made us a little bit less aggressive going down the stretch, soit really hurt us.” Fouls and low depth stop Gophers comeback attempt in NCAA tournamentMinnesota lost by 11 after bringing the game against Middle Tennessee State within fourChris DangSophomore forward Jordan Murphy looks to get around the Blue Raiders defense on Thursday, Mar. 16, 2017 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin at the Bradley Center. The Gophers played against Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders. Mike HendricksonMarch 17, 2017Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintMinnesota’s crowd at the Bradley Center in Milwaukee suddenly had life late in the game.The Gophers had shaved a late 17-point deficit to four in five minutes, and the Minnesota fan base was on its feet for the first time in a while.But just as the Gophers had life, Reggie Upshaw hit a 3-pointer to spark a Blue Raiders’ run, spelling an early exit for the Gophers in an 81-72 loss in the first round of the NCAA tournament. “[Upshaw’s 3-pointer] really hurt us,” said Gophers head coach Richard Pitino. “Give them credit, we couldn’t stop them.”While the Gophers were the higher seed in the game, national pundits overwhelmingly predicted that Minnesota would be upset by the 12th-seeded Blue Raiders.The game appeared over for Minnesota with 11 minutes left. The Blue Raiders were up by 16 but began to lose their lead.Amir Coffey made a 3-point shot for the Gophers and hit two free throw attempts. After back-to-back field goals by Coffey and Dupree McBrayer, plus a 3-point play from Eric Curry, it was a 4-point deficit for the first time since late in the first half.But that’s when Minnesota’s flaws leaked back into the game.Three key players for the Gophers — Reggie Lynch, Jordan Murphy and Curry — were in foul trouble and there was nothing the Gophers could do to stop Middle Tennessee State from closing out the game.“We were in that comeback, we were excited trying to get over the hump,” Coffey said. “[We were] trying to get it up and take the lead but just didn’t get there.”Upshaw — who finished the game with a game-high 19 points — scored seven straight points after Minnesota brought the game within four as he took advantage of a hobbled Mason.He extended his team’s lead to eight with 4:30 remaining, and later had three rebounds to help finish the Gophers off.last_img read more

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Rigol Introduces Low Cost, Real-Time 3 GHz Spectrum Analyzer

first_imgRIGOL Technologies has announced a new low-cost Real-Time Spectrum Analyzer (RSA3000E) to its RF Test Portfolio. The New RSA3000E Spectrum Analyzers bring the power of UltraReal real-time analysis to a new class of customers who previously had no access to this advanced capability. The RSA3000E combines the power of a high performance Swept Spectrum Analyzer with the analysis capability of a Real-Time Analyzer at an unprecedented entry-level price point of $1,799.The RSA3000E is available in 1.5GHz and 3GHz models with available tracking generators. The instruments come standard with 10 MHz of Real-time analysis bandwidth with seamless capture and a 9.3 microsecond 100%POI. The RSA3000E provides the same 7 rich visualization modes and powerful triggering capability as RIGOL’s other UltraReal products, only at a lower entry price. The RSA3000E also can function as a traditional swept spectrum analyzer with class-leading specifications. Resolution Bandwidth (RBW) is standard at 1Hz, noise floor as low as -161dBm, phase noise of -102dBc/Hz, and a full span sweep as fast as 1ms provides a powerful analyzer for the entry-level customer.RIGOL helped create the market for entry-level spectrum analysis years ago with the DSA815 analyzer. By making it affordable and reliable the company is making spectrum analyzers accessible to an entirely new class of customers and has helped put analyzers on every test bench. This combination of performance, quality and price helped make the DSA815 the most popular spectrum analyzer on the planet. The RSA3000E is enabled with advanced analysis capabilities, which make it a perfect choice for embedded IOT engineers integrating RF technologies and those customers doing EMI pre-compliance testing.The integrated EMI pre-compliance option (RSA3000E-EMI) provides a complete EMI Pre-Compliance Solution allowing engineers to measure, compare, analyze, and report on EMI issues throughout their design process. Features like integrated CISPR Bandwidths and Detectors, simple limit line construction, automated multi-segment scan, and up to three simultaneous detectors make it simple to get initial scans and measurements. Advanced capabilities like real-time detector measurements, automated peak/limit searches, and simple correction table integration make configuring more complex test environments and analyzing results easier than ever before. Lastly, comprehensive setup, storage and report generation capabilities make it easy to document, share, and repeat your tests.The integrated ASK/FSK Demodulation Option (RSA3000E-ASK/FSK) allows RF engineers to characterize today’s ubiquitous ASK and FSK modulation schemes. The Demodulation Application gives engineers the ability to utilize up to 13 integrated measurement functions including I/Q waveform and RF Envelope, Constellation and Vector Diagrams, Symbol Level Decode, Time and Frequency, and Bit Error Analysis against known sequences providing quick insight into signal behaviors.While the RSA3000E is priced to make it accessible to HAMs, hobbyists, and educators, the advanced performance and capabilities make it an attractive option for IoT device integration, EMI and other commercial applications. The RSA3000E is available and shipping now. Click here to know more about the RSA3000E.last_img read more

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Bears claw their way back to win

first_imgSoftball BY SIMON KESLEP Port Moresby womens softball season round two pitched off on a good note for Bears as they displayed a team effort 10-7 win over Saints in the A grade main game on Saturday at Bisini diamond one. Bears led by the daughter and mother combination of Rose and Carol Apelis on the pitching and catching mound with assistance coming from Helen Bunbun, Lisa Polum, Joyce Inguba, Dianne Gideon, Francine Malum, Nadia Kua and outfielders, to oust Saints. “We have a good combination, we just need to know our opposing team batters and work along that line. I think Rosie (daughter) is doing well so far. “When she rather feels to take the other direction from my calls she does that but I think we did well,” said Bears player and coach Carol Apelis. Young Rose and her mother (Carol) hail from a mix parentage of East New Britain (Duke of York) and West New Britain (Kove) with Rose following her grandmother’s footsteps on the pitching mound. “I think we move to Bears club in 2016 but we started off with Wolves Club and credit would go to our head coach John Joseph on his coaching of my daughter and me,” said Apelis. Prior to Bears running the show on the batting mound at the completion of bottom fifth inning; it was an all Saints affair dominating in the opening innings of play. Well placed hits by Bears top batters in the likes of Gedion, Kua, Polum, Malum and Inguba resulted in the come from behind team effort win. “I think it is how Bears play basically because it was a good effort the ladies put into the game. The ladies performed to their best team effort and I am very proud of the girls. I think Saints did well because they placed good hits and we had to cover in fielding,” said Apelis. Saints coach Dimi Wosley said Bears scored runs (Bears) at last turn on bat through their (Saints) errors. “I can’t say much but we just blame ourselves meaning we just basically gave the win away. We need to try polish up on maintain the lead but otherwise we gave the win away. “For couple of our players they have been consisting in batting wise but we still need improvement in the whole batting line up. It all goes back to training and polishing up as well,” said Wosley. Saints who were the grand final runners up last season are keen to secure a finals spot with Wosley banking on the number of wins they secured so far. The unofficial placing for Saints in the A grade points ladder sees them on fifth with seven points. Runs scored, Bears 10 (Nadia Kua 2, Joyce Inguba, Dianne Gideon 2, Francine Malum, Helen Bunbun, Lisa Polum and Carol Apelis 2) defeating Saints 7 (Kurai Tovia, Cheryl Moka, Stephanie Manning, Margaret Parom, Addie Tamti, Sherrie Moka and Alice Ono. Meanwhile the top of the ladder match between reigning champions and Anti Pest Sponsored United sisters and Gazelle resulted in close score line finish. Sisters survived the slugfest contest with a 3-1 win.last_img read more

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