Urbanites are fleeing to rural communities out West

first_imgCitydwellers fleeing coronavirus have descended on rural communities across the Western U.S. (Credit: iStock)Well-heeled city slickers are looking far and wide to escape the virus. And many are settling on the remote communities of the American West.The influx of potential coronavirus carriers to small rural communities has some full-time residents worried about local outbreaks that their healthcare systems can’t handle, according to the Wall Street Journal.That’s the same dilemma facing many vacation communities outside New York City where urbanites fled in droves in recent weeks.The ski resort town of Big Sky, Montana is among the otherwise small off-season communities experiencing a surge in visitors. The local county, Gallatin County, accounts for more than a third of Montana’s 330 or so cases of COVID-19.Some community groups, like the Big Sky Chamber, are “not encouraging people to come at this time,” said CEO Candace Carr Strauss. Yellowstone Club, a resort in the town, also asked members to stay away.Late last month, Montana Gov. Steve Bullock issued a stay-at-home order and recently ordered out-of-state visitors to self-quarantine for two weeks.The Victory Ranch preserve outside Park City, Utah saw a surge in members coming out to wait out the pandemic in their cabins. It’s taxed the property’s management company, who is delivering groceries and takeout to people in their cabins. [WSJ] – Dennis Lynch This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

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UAE study finds high MERS seroprevalence in some camel workers

first_imgA new MERS-CoV seroprevalence study of camel workers in Abu Dhabi found high levels for people in certain jobs, as Saudi Arabia—the country hit hardest by the virus—reported three more cases, all in people who contracted the virus from other patients.Exposures in markets, slaughterhousesFor the seroprevalence study, a research team from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) examined blood samples of camel workers from 2014 to 2017. Some workers were from an open-air camel market in Abu Dhabi linked to a 2015 human case, and others worked at two of the city’s camel slaughterhouses.Their goals were to sift out specific risk factors that seem more likely to lead to MERS-CoV (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus) transmission to help guide steps to prevent infections in people and to pinpoint risk groups that would benefit from a future vaccine. The team published its findings yesterday in an early online edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases.Three rounds of blood sampling took place during the study period, and though all workers were asked to provide samples, participation was voluntary. Some workers were repeatedly sampled during multiple rounds.During the third round of sampling, investigators administered a survey to gather information about worker demographics, travel history, consumption of raw camel products (meat, milk, and urine, which is actually a practice for some in the country), camel-related work tasks, personal protective equipment use, and handwashing practices.Levels highest in camel salesmenAntibody tests on blood samples were conducted at the CDC.Round 1 involved samples from 100 workers, round 2 from 151 workers, and round 3 from 235 workers. MERS-CoV antibodies were found in 6% of samples from round 1, 19% from round 2, and 17% from round 3.Among all workers, MERS-CoV seroprevalence was especially high for certain occupations, especially camel salesmen (49%) and animal or waste transporters (22%). Self-reported diabetes was another factor linked to being seropositive, which fits with earlier reports of underlying health conditions as a risk factor for MERS-CoV infection.Of just the market workers, giving medications to live camels and using cleaning equipment were associated with increased risk of being seropositive for MERS-CoV.Among other findings, MERS-CoV was detected in market camels during the study period, and one worker seroconverted, hinting at active transmission from camels to people.”Taken collectively, our findings suggest an underestimated prevalence of human MERS-CoV infection in settings where the virus is circulating among camels, probably resulting from camel-to-human transmission,” the group wrote.New cases include 1 from Khafji outbreakMeanwhile, in Saudi Arabia’s steady stream of new cases, the country’s health ministry reported three new infections in updates yesterday and today in its epidemiologic week 15 report. All involve men listed as secondary cases, meaning they probably contracted the virus from another sick patient. Camel exposure is listed as unknown for all three.One of them, age 34, appears to be part of an outbreak in Khafji in northeastern Saudi Arabia near the border with Kuwait, which has now grown to 11 cases.The other patients include a 42-year-old from Ad Darb in the country’s far southwestern Jazan region and a 64-year-old from Al Kharj in central Saudi Arabia.Saudi Arabia has now reported 129 cases for the year.In an update today from the World Health Organization (WHO) Eastern Mediterranean regional office, officials said 9 more cases have been linked to a large outbreak in Wadi ad-Dawasir, raising the total as of the end of March to 61 cases, 8 of them fatal.The agency added that Saudi Arabia’s health ministry has launched a full investigation of the event, including efforts to identify all household and healthcare contacts of patients with confirmed infections. Infection prevention and control steps have been enhanced at health facilities, including for workers in emergency room and intensive care units.The WHO’s snapshot of MERS-CoV activity for March also said 25 cases were reported for the month, all in Saudi Arabia. It put the latest global total since the first human cases were identified in 2012 to 2,399, at least 827 of them fatal. More than 90% of the cases are from Saudi Arabia.See also:Apr 10 Emerg Infect Dis abstractApr 11 MOH updateApr 10 WHO MERS update for Marchlast_img read more

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DLSU Lady Spikers get near twice-to-beat edge

first_imgLady Spikers was on top 21-17 midway in the third set but Golden Tigresses rallied back to come to within 22-23. A block by Dy on Rondina followed by a kill by May Luna closed the match for La Salle.“Ito iyong isang sakit ng La Salle e. Pagka-long break, pagbalik dito, medyo kinakalawang,” said Lady Spikers mentor Ramil de Jesus.“Medyo hindi tama. Maraming mga unforced errors na ginagalaw. Parang hindi magkakakilala sa loob,” he added.In the opening match, National University Lady Bulldogs carved out a 26-24, 26-24, 25-20 victory over also-ran University of the East Lady Warriors to check a five-game skid.Jaja Santiago finished with 22 points, including three blocks, as Lady Bulldogs assured themselves of a playoff for the remaining Final Four berth./PN De La Salle University Lady Spikers’ Kim Dy launches an attack against University of Santo Tomas Golden Tigresses. SPIN.PH MANILA – De La Salle University Lady Spikers inched closer to a twice-to-beat incentive in the UAAP Season 80 women’s volleyball after a 25-23, 25-23, 25-22 win over University of Santo Tomas Golden Tigresses.Kim Dy finished with 12 points, including four blocks and six digs, while reigning MVP Majoy Baron added 9 points as Lady Spikers stayed on top of the standings (10-2) after the Sunday night match at the San Juan Arena.Lady Spikers found itself down 19-23 early in Set 1 before banking on Dy’s consecutive points to tie the scores 23-all. An ace by Desiree Cheng and an error by Golden Tigresses’ Cherry Rondina gave the set to DLSU.La Salle was up early in the second set but UST battled back to force a 21-all count. Back-to-back errors by Golden Tigresses followed by hits by Cheng ended the set for Lady Spikers.last_img read more

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