McCarthy breaks ground on new Banner Boswell ER, patient tower

first_imgMcCarthy Building Companies recently broke ground on a new ER and patient tower project at Banner Boswell Medical Center in Sun City, Ariz., with the demolition of a 33-year-old, two-story parking structure that paves the way for the start of new construction. The new $106 million emergency room (ER), main lobby and patient tower at Banner Boswell Medical Center, located at 10401 W. Thunderbird Blvd. in Sun City, Ariz., includes a 40,000-square-foot emergency room and a new six-story tower that will serve as the hospital’s new main entrance and provide room for future growth.The new ER, which is projected to complete construction in summer 2020, will provide much needed additional capacity. Banner Boswell’s existing ER often runs at or near capacity. The new ER will increase the number of beds by a third — from 42 to 56 — allowing the department to care for up to 60,000 ER patients annually. The current ER was built to handle up to 45,000 patients annually.“Banner Boswell Medical Center opened nearly 50 years ago to serve the small, but growing community of Sun City,” said Banner Boswell Chief Operating Officer Brian Standage. “Since then, our hospital has evolved into a leading provider of medical care in the Northwest Valley, including a nationally-recognized heart program. Our new ER and patient tower positions us to serve the community for the next 50 years and beyond,” he said, “as we strive to make healthcare easier and life better for our patients.”The new tower will represent an additional $46 million investment into the community by nonprofit Banner Health. Combined with the new emergency room, which the community is helping support through donations to the Sun Health Foundation, Banner Boswell is set to receive an investment totaling more than $106 million.“What an exciting time this is for the community as a new milestone in health care is occurring, thanks in part to community support for the ER through Sun Health Foundation’s Generosity  for Generations Campaign,” said Joe La Rue, Sun Health President/CEO. “We are proud of the philanthropic partnership we have with Banner Boswell – philanthropic partners to continue a legacy of health care.”The tower’s first floor, to open in late 2020, will contain the main lobby, gift shop, retail pharmacy, admitting desk and chapel. The five floors above the main lobby will remain “shelled” space, reserved for future inpatient rooms. “Shell space” is space constructed to meet future needs; it is space enclosed by an exterior building shell, but otherwise unfinished inside.The project is being managed using Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) with the owner, design team, general contractor and trade partners all co-located on the project site and committed to the success of the project through robust collaboration and innovation.“Co-locating the entire project team by bringing all stakeholders together in one facility has proven to be an immeasurable asset that promotes collaborative team work, a solutions-oriented culture, and a high level of accountability from all project stakeholders,” said Chris Jacobson, vice president of McCarthy Building Companies. “Hospital construction projects inherently possess a lot of moving parts, and traditional project delivery methods often result in a fair amount of redesign. By employing IPD and co-location strategies, the team is able to move forward unimpeded.”Some of the innovative cost savings measures on the Banner Boswell project include prefabrication of the following components:• Exterior skin, including glass, metal panel, EIFS (Exterior Insulated Finish System) and masonry block• Interior partition walls• ER exam room headwalls including all MEP (Mechanical / Electrical / Plumbing) componentsThe prefabrication will be completed offsite in a shop for the interior scope and onsite in a controlled environment for the exterior skin. As part of the IPD process, all the major building trade partners were contracted early in design to aid in target value design, constructability and Building Information Modeling (BIM) coordination prior to permit. This has proven to save on costs and ensures that the construction team is able to proceed with system fabrication soon after the building begins coming out of the ground. The architect on the project is HMC Architects. Major trade partners include Buehler & Buehler, Southland, Foothills Fire Protection, Schuff Steel, Cannon & Wendt, University Mechanical, Norris Design and The Berg Group.last_img read more

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Howland reveals his blueprint in rebuilding MSU hoops

first_img Session ID: 2020-09-19:7edd4144500f284a3a5a3faf Player ID: videojs-brightcove-player-444474-4132546533001 OK Close Modal DialogCaption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. “My last team at UCLA led the conference in scoring and was eighth in the country in transition opportunities and minutes in transition,” Howland said. “That’s what we expect to do here at Mississippi State.” The strong offense wasn’t complemented by a great defense. The Bruins allowed 69.3 points per game, the worst since Howland’s first two seasons in Los Angeles.Last season, Mississippi State held opponents to 63.5 points per game, which ranked fifth in the SEC.“Defense will be and always will be a priority for me,” Howland said. “I am a strong believer that championships are won and started at the defensive end of the floor.”Howland’s three best defensive teams advanced the Final Four. His 2005-06 team limited teams to 58.7 point per game, which was the best during his tenure. That team played for national title. The Bruins returned to the Final Four the next two seasons with defenses that held opponents below 60 points per game. “It starts with a constant defensive presence that you can count on,” Howland said. “Defense wins on the road and you have to win on the road to be a champion.” During the run to the national championship game against Florida, the Bruins scored 67.6 points per game. In the next two seasons, UCLA averaged more than 71 points per game. Howland hasn’t returned to the Final Four since. MSU’s only Final Four appearance came in 1996. The blueprint is there, now, Howland has to find the pieces.“Once it’s been done somewhere it can be done again,” Howland said. “It just takes an incredible amount of effort.”How MSU, Howland agreed to a four-year, $8.2 million dealContact Michael Bonner at [email protected] Follow @MichaelBBonner on Twitter. Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUND STARKVILLE — In Ben Howland’s decade-long tenure at UCLA, his teams averaged 70.7 points per game. The Bruins allowed 64.6 points per game. The stats offer window into what Howland hopes to accomplish as Mississippi State’s new basketball coach.“Nobody is going to play harder than Mississippi State,” Howland said. “No one will be better prepared than our players and team as we get ready for the season.”The Bruins averaged 74.4 points per game in Howland’s final year at UCLA in 2013. It was the second highest average during his tenure. But UCLA also shot 45.1 percent from the field, the lowest total during any of his ten seasons.They key was attempting 2,131 shots, which was the second most of his tenure. The only time his UCLA teams attempt more was in 2007-08. The Bruins took 2,164. That total came in 39 games, four more than the 2012-13 season.“Something I did at my last year at UCLA, was making a huge emphasis on pushing the ball on all makes and misses. Especially on makes now,” Howland said. “Most teams do not expect you to run after they scored. Most of the time kids are celebrating and meanwhile, (the opponent) is taking the ball up to the net trying to get a layup, a wide open three or a good shot.”UCLA averaged 60 shot attempts a game in Howland’s final season. Mississippi State averaged 48 for Rick Ray last year. If the Bulldogs attempt 12 more shot a game, while shooting its season average of 43 percent, it would lead to five more made baskets. The minimum 10-point increase boosts MSU’s scoring total to 71.8 points per game. The total would have placed MSU in the top five in the Southeastern Conference in scoring last year. Instead, Mississippi State’s 61.8 points per game was 13th.last_img read more

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