MPs urge government to preserve access to European legal services market

first_imgPreserving access to the single market in legal services is among the reasons why the government urgently needs to set out a vision for trade with the EU following Brexit, MPs say today. In its first report, the International Trade Committee of the House of Commons backs re-joining the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) to preserve continuity in trading relationships. The report cites evidence from the Law Society on the legal services sector. The Society told the committee that while the EU single market in services is still ‘a work in progress’, in legal services a single market is already a reality.Mickael Laurans, the Society’s head of international policy and engagement, told the committee that the continuation of the participation of the UK legal services sector in the two EU lawyers’ directives and the mutual recognition of qualifications directive was a ‘key ask’.Leaving the single market would render the UK vulnerable to restrictions on legal practice that vary among member states. Some EU jurisdictions operate nationality requirements, Laurans noted, while right of audience before EU courts could be lost by UK lawyers. There might also be problems regarding clients’ ability to benefit from legal professional privilege.The committee says the government must act quickly to bolster confidence and put the UK in the best position to forge new trading relationships after 2019.Among its recommendations is for the government to publish a white paper about the possibility of the UK re-joining the European Free Trade Association (EFTA).EFTA, whose current members are Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland, has free trade agreements covering 38 countries, which the UK might stand to benefit from if it were to re-join. According to the report, the committee ‘was impressed by the potential benefits of EFTA membership, given the close alignment between the UK’s economy and those of EFTA members, although the government has not proposed this as an option’.last_img read more

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Macfarlanes posts PEP of £1.7m as Mills & Reeve boosts staff bonus pot

first_imgCity firm Macfarlanes has become the latest firm to report a stellar year, posting an increase in its operating surplus and record profit per equity partner (PEP).Operating profit came in at £107m, an increase of nearly 25% on the previous 12 months, while PEP was £1.7m, up 25.5%. Turnover climbed 20% to £201.5m, revealing an operating margin that makes Macfarlanes one of the most profitable law firms in the Square Mile.The firm said the results reflected a great year and one in which nearly all its markets were buoyant.A spokesperson for the firm said: ‘We live in an age of increasing volatility and law firm financial performance is bound to reflect that. Our firm is no different and we expect our results to show variable growth year on year. This year has started encouragingly, but there are many potential headwinds out there. We expect the coming year to be more challenging and we do not expect to enjoy the level of growth that we saw last year every year.’Meanwhile, national firm Mills & Reeve said its staff would be sharing a £2m bonus pot after a ‘stellar year’.The firm did not provide profit figures but said turnover rose to a record £106.3m – an increase of 14% on 2017.‘As a result of the strong financial performance the firm has announced the largest-ever all staff bonus pool of £2m, equivalent to 7% of the firm’s salary bill. This equates to a bonus for every full-time employee who has been with the firm for at least a year,’ the firm said.This equates to a bonus of £2,273 for every full-time member of staff who meets the criterion. Additional sums are awarded to staff who have been with the firm for over three years and five years. There is also a pro rata bonus for members of staff who are part-time and/or who have not been with the firm for the whole financial year.last_img read more

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Logistics for the energy revolution: Why shipping has a vital role…

first_imgThe latest US example shows renewable energy is becoming more cost-efficient and that the cost of building new solar and wind plants is lower than running existing coal-fired power plants. Naturally, technical developments will continue, further strengthening the case for renewables. Why RoRo make sense for breakbulk cargo Historically, the difference in cost between renewable energy and fossil fuels has been too great to support a shift to green energy. But with new and innovative technology coming onto the market, we’re now seeing a big change. Renewable energy is necessary for a sustainable future – green partnerships between cargo owners and transportation providers will also help to make that future a reality. It’s widely reported that radical change is taking place in the energy sector. But why is maritime such a green logistics choice for the major players? Stefan Kjellström, vice president for breakbulk and pricing at Wallenius Wilhelmsen, investigates. China and India ramp up in renewables race This is forcing manufacturers and engineers to think about logistics in new ways – with dismantled transportation one option. This technologically superior and sensitive equipment needs to be carefully handled and transported using a limited number of lifts to avoid damage. The logistics challenges ahead will require experience, global reach, and local support, as well as tailored equipment to ensure efficient and secure transportation. (Source: Wallenius Wilhelmsen) (Image Courtesy: Wallenius Wilhelmsen) As industries focus on sustainable technology, they must also take into account responsible and sustainable transportation. Author: Baibhav Mishra Everyone knows that global trade and maritime transportation are fundamental to sustaining economic growth. But maritime transportation will also become indispensable when for maintaining a sustainable global economy. It’s the most environmentally-sound mode of mass transport, both in terms of energy efficiency and pollution prevention. By: Stefan Kjellström, Vice president for breakbulk and pricing at Wallenius Wilhelmsen A good example is Kamuthi – a single plant in India that powers more than 150,000 homes. Likewise, the Gansu wind farm in China is targeting a staggering 20 gigawatts capacity by 2020. In Europe, there are plans for offshore wind farms with a combined capacity of 100 gigawatts. Within the shipping industry, responsible shipping lines should strive to continuously minimise their environmental footprint through innovative technology and sophisticated engineering. Vessel design should mirror this. With digital transformation a key part of the fourth industrial revolution, big data is being used to track and control vessel performance, which should in turn lead to a lower CO2 footprint. These developments – in combination with technical innovations – mean that it’s only natural that some of the equipment for these projects is growing in size. Turbines are moving towards 1,000 tonnes in weight and some giant solar panels are now too big for transportation in containers. Around the globe, huge wind and solar energy farms are being built. China and India are at the forefront, competing to run the world’s largest renewable power plants. Sea News, August 13last_img read more

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Pitching Matchups For Indians Weekend Series With Chicago

first_img Matt Loede has been a part of the Cleveland Sports Media for over 21 years, with experience covering Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association, the National Football League and even high school and college events. He has been a part of the Cleveland Indians coverage since the opening of Jacobs/Progressive Field in 1994, and spent two and a half years covering the team for 92.3 The Fan, and covers them daily for Associated Press Radio. You can follow Matt on Twitter HERE. Related TopicsCody AndersonIndiansJosh TomlinWhite Sox CLEVELAND – The Indians and White Sox will wrap up the long homestand this weekend at Progressive Field, as the 72-73 Tribe looks to stay in the AL Wild Card chase. They will enter Friday night four games back of the final wild card spot in the American League.Here’s the pitching matchups for the weekend slate. Fri September 18 v Chicago-AL, 7:10pm SportsTime Ohio/WTAM/WMMS/IRNRHP Cody Anderson vs. LHP Chris SaleSat September 19 v Chicago-AL, 7:10pm SportsTime Ohio/WTAM/WMMS/IRNRHP Carlos Carrasco vs. LHP Carlos RodonSun September 20 v Chicago-AL 7:10pm SportsTime Ohio/WTAM/WMMS/IRNRHP Josh Tomlin vs. LHP John Danks center_img Matt Loedelast_img read more

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EDIBLE ARRANGEMENT: Le Courtois isn’t playing with food — she’s making…

first_img Viviane Le Courtois is showing Raw, Cooked, Fermented on Monday June 13, 2016 at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinel A cast iron artichoke on Monday June 13, 2016 at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinel AURORA | Julia Child once said that, “In France, cooking is a serious art form and a national sport.”Now, more than a decade after the death of the woman credited with aggrandizing commercial cooking in America, local mixed-media artist Viviane Le Courtois is working to solidify that sentiment stateside and take it to a distinctly unique level.Late last month, Le Courtois opened a new exhibit at Denver Botanic Gardens entitled “Raw, Cooked, Fermented,” which features more than a dozen pieces of various media that use food to create art.Hanging on the naked concrete walls of the DBG’s Gates Garden Court Gallery, several maple-framed pieces coyly hide ties to the organic world. Upon examination, a series of seemingly diffident sketches depicting different home goods like pickles, kimchi and sauerkraut is revealed to be stained with the respective juice of each concoction — a sketch of giant red mustard leaves pops with a magnetizing scarlet hue. Across the room, a series of embryonic prints made with kombucha hang beside a pair of cast iron artichokes. Viviane Le Courtois’s art exhibit Raw, Cooked, Fermented is on display on Monday June 13, 2016 at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinel Viviane Le Courtois is showing Raw, Cooked, Fermented on Monday June 13, 2016 at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinel Garlics and Onions, made out of ceramics by Viviane Le Courtois at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinelcenter_img A piece named Raw, Cooked, Fermented by Viviane Le Courtois is at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinel Elliptocyte 1is a print made from kombucha etchings on Monday June 13, 2016 at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinel Le Courtois perfected her still-secret kombucha printing process in 2004 by staining zinc plates with the bacteria’s highly acidic juices. A program manager at Downtown Aurora Visual Arts by day, the Denver-based artist beams as she describes some of the smallest pieces in the new exhibit, which are comprised of several ceramic onions and garlic cloves. They’re foods her family has grown in her native Brittany, France for generations.“When I was a kid we ate tons of artichokes and cauliflower,” she says. “Foraging, cooking, art, it’s just always been a part of my life.”Le Courtois said that her fascination with the relationship between art and food started early in her childhood, when her mother scolded her for picking flowers out of the garden to make paint. “Because that was all I had,” she says. “I had no art supplies, so I had to find my own.”But it wasn’t until she was 19 years old and a student at art school in Niece, France that Le Courtois’ professional blending of food and art began to flourish. One of her first works at school involved making sculptures out of chewed up licorice roots.A Denver resident for more than 20 years, Le Courtois is always working on a project that brings the kitchen into the studio — or vice versa. She’s typically working on some sort of new “kitchen experiment,” like growing a kombucha culture for her next round of zinc prints, or nursing one of her various jarred goods in her new house in the East Montclair neighborhood.It’s that lifestyle that made Le Courtois’ work ideal for the gardens ongoing exploration and exhibition of the intersection between art and food, according to Kim Manajek, associate director of exhibitions, art and interpretation at DBG.“It is a beautifully cohesive exhibition that is a perfect fit for Denver Botanic Gardens’ Gates Garden Court Gallery,” Manjek said in a statement.Despite the divine match, Le Courtois said that she was challenged by DBG’s stipulation that she couldn’t use any truly live material in the exhibit.“The show had to last for two months, and they didn’t want anything in the display case that could attract bugs,” she said. “I think it was a challenge for me to not work with any live material in a place that has a bunch of live things.”Le Courtois will be leading a workshop at DBG at the end of July on how to grow your own art supplies. Her completed works will be on display daily at the Gates Garden Court Gallery through the end of July. Viviane Le Courtois is showing Raw, Cooked, Fermented on Monday June 13, 2016 at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinellast_img read more

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Bringing artists with different perspectives together

first_imgFamous artist and curator Amrita Prakash is organising a group painting art and sculpture exhibition titled ‘Beyond Colours – 3’, at Open Palm Court Gallery, India Habitat Centre. Beyond Colours-3 attempts to showcase various styles of paintings and sculpture. It is an exhibition of different perceptions representing diversity in art. In this show, artists from different parts of the country will share a platform to display their creativity, experiment with different mediums, subjects and materials giving a signature of India, to women, darkness, death, cosmic and the abstract. A total of 21 artists will be displaying their work from July 12 – 16, 10 am to 7 pm.last_img

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