Police officer fired after fatal shooting involving unarmed Black couple in Illinois

first_imgAlessandro Biascioli/iStockBY: MARK OSBORNE AND BILL HUTCHINSON, ABC NEWS(CHICAGO) — The police officer who opened fire on an unarmed Black couple in Illinois, killing a 19-year-old and seriously injuring his girlfriend, has been fired.The Waukegan, Illinois, officer, who has still not been named, was fired late Friday, according to Waukegan Chief of Police Wayne Walles.“In the evening hours of October 23, 2020 the City of Waukegan terminated the officer that discharged his firearm during that incident, for multiple policy and procedure violations,” Walles said in a statement.Marcellis Stinnette was killed Tuesday night when an officer opened fire on the vehicle he was a passenger in at about 11:55 p.m., according to police.Waukegan Police Department Cmdr. Edgar Navarro said earlier this week that Stinnette was sitting in the passenger seat of a “suspicious” car that was approached by an officer. The car fled and was later pulled over by a second officer.“That officer exited his vehicle and the vehicle that he was investigating began to reverse toward the officer,” Navarro alleged. “The officer then pulled out his duty weapon and fired into the vehicle that was reversing. Both occupants were struck.”Tafarra Willams, the mother of Stinnette’s child and diver of the vehicle, was struck in the hand and stomach and is still recovering in the hospital. Her injuries were not life-threatening.Both officers had been placed on administrative duty while the shooting was being investigated.The investigation is being handled by the Illinois State Police, a fact reiterated by the police chief in his statement Friday night.“The Illinois State Police are continuing to conduct their independent investigation,” he wrote. “Once that investigation has been completed, it will be turned over to the Lake County Illinois State’s Attorney’s Office for review.”Prominent civil rights attorneys Ben Crump and Antonio M. Romanucci announced earlier Friday that he would be representing the 20-year-old Williams.“Ms. Williams’ legal team will begin our own investigation into what happened during that incident, because we do not trust the police narrative in this case. We have seen over and over that the ‘official’ report when police kill Black people is far too often missing or misrepresenting details,” Crump said in a statement. “We will share our findings with the public when we have uncovered the truth.”Crump and Romanucci also represent the families of George Floyd and Daniel Prude, both killed by police earlier this year.Waukegan Mayor Sam Cunningham said at a news conference Wednesday he was worried about violent protests in the city.“I’m nervous because there’s a lot of uncertainty out there, there’s a lot of rumors flying around. I’m nervous for Waukegan,” Cunningham said. “We’ve seen this play out throughout this country. It just rips through communities and it takes years to rebuild.”Protests have remained relatively small and peaceful in the days since the killing.ABC News’ Devin Villacis and Will Gretsky contributed to this report.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Arshiya Logistics doubles up

first_imgThe first shipment saw Arshiya Logistics, part of Intergroup Shipping, move a 750 tonne Manitowoc crane from Mesaieed, Qatar to Masan, Korea for a Korean multinational. The crane was dismantled at the QAFCO Fertiliser complex, Mesaieed Industrial City on the east coast of Qatar peninsula and transported in sections to Doha port. The consignor insisted on the consignment being shipped in one movement.Arshiya chartered Hoegh Line’s ro-ro ship Pacific Spirit for the movement. The consignment consisted of 106 pieces. Thirty-eight flat bed trailers and 18 low bed trailers were used, as well as six 16 m trailers.In the second project, Arshiya moved eight pieces of used construction equipment to a Malaysian destination from Qatar.The equipment was loaded at Abu Nakla, Qatar and had to be urgently delivered to the client’s site at Bukit Beruntung Rawang, Malaysia. The 484 cu m cargo was shipped on a NYK line ro-ro vessel to Port Klang. The voyage took around two weeks.Arshiya Logistics has joined the International Freight & Logistics Network as project cargo has proved to be a significant growth area for the IFLN.last_img read more

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Rio History: Fire Making

first_imgBy Steve HathcockThe ability to make fire by rubbing two sticks together was arguably the single greatest accomplishment made by our forefathers. The principle is simple: one wooden stick, called the drill or saw, was twisted or rubbed against another, known as the hearth. If done properly, enough heat is created to ignite dried tinder placed where the two objects touch. Sometimes, grit was used to create extra friction. At last, humans could sleep in relative safety, as the flames from blazing fires kept predators at bay.As man spread across the earth, he discovered a new way to create fire by striking flint and metal together. Soon, seasoned travelers would not venture forth without a tinder kit containing flint, steel (or another metal), and tinder. With this advanced technology a fire could be built in as little as thirty minutes.Materials used in making the kits varied considerably, but all were designed to keep the tinder dry. In 19th century India, a gentleman attached a slim brass box to his belt while the common man covered their fire boxes with skin from goat’s testicles. You have to wonder what Freud would have made of the whole thing.English chemist, John Walker, (no connection to the famous scotch whiskey with the same name) invented the friction match in 1827. These new-fangled fire sticks, commonly called Lucifers, could be struck against almost any surface and produce a pale noiseless fire. But phosphorus, the main component used in the new matches, is very unstable, sometimes bursting into flames from the slightest contact.There were other unforeseen consequences too. An article in the 1846 issue of the Northern Journal of Medicine, described the environmental dangers experienced by young girls who produced the matches in poorly ventilated factories. Red ulcerated gums, the first symptoms of phosphoric poisoning, were soon followed by a general deterioration of the jawbone. As a result of very real dangers, Lucifers were outlawed in many towns. Salvation was on the horizon though. Louise V. Aronson developed a match using sulfur and registered his invention under the name “Safety Match” on March 16, 1897.Fifteen years later, Ronson and his partner Alexander Harris, produced the first modern pocket lighter, named the “Wonderlite”. This lighter operated by scratching a metal rod over a strip of flint, creating a spark that ignited a fuel-soaked wick. The Wonderlite underwent several transformations over the next twenty years or so until the company’s catalogs included automatic table-lighters and a number of novelty-luxury lighters, built into cigarette cases and mechanical pencils.Guns and lighters have always proven to be a match up as illustrated by the lighter’s popularity during the two world wars. Lighters provided soldiers and sailors immediate flames for illumination, rescue beacons, fires for cooking and warmth and not incidentally, lighting up of cigarettes. Due to frequent dampness, matches were often useless and as the saying goes, necessity is the mother of all inventions. Mechanically minded soldiers used cartridge cases, bullets, helmets, coins and other front-line debris to create rudimentary mechanisms that were highly inventive in design. These trench-art lighters have become very popular and share a unique place in the heart of collectors around the world.The basic cigarette lighter of today has changed very little since Ronson’s invention. Unfortunately, sometimes man’s progresses can back-fire, so to speakIn the 21st century, lighters are being mass produced to resemble just about anything you can imagine and are catching the eye of the consumer as never before. But there is a “dark side” to Aronson’s invention, illustrated in part by the carelessness of which people dispose of these “disposable items.” Just take a walk on the beaches of Padre Island sometime and count how many you see. The moral of the story is; just when we think man has become enlightened, he comes full circle and finds himself right back in the dark.  Share RelatedRio History: Making SparksBy STEVE HATHCOCK Special to the PRESS The ability to make fire by rubbing two sticks together was arguably the single greatest accomplishment made by our forefathers. The principle is simple; one wooden stick, called the drill or saw, was twisted or rubbed against another, known as the hearth. If done…August 18, 2017In “News”The Most Haunted Places in the RGV: The Old Mercedes Fire StationBy Joanna “Luna” Sanchez Special to the PRESS  Welcome back to The Most Haunted Places in the RGV.  Two weeks ago, we explored the history of Brownsville’s Daisy Starck, a young girl trampled during a parade in 1897.  This week, we are taking our investigation to the old Mercedes fire…December 27, 2019In “News”Former firefighter voices concernsSpecial to the PRESS February 5, 2015 Editor’s Note: The following is a guest column by Laguna Vista resident and former Laguna Vista Volunteer Firefighter Ralph Ayers in response to a story about speed bump concerns in last week’s edition of the PRESS.  Dear Editor, Port Isabel – South Padre PRESS…February 6, 2015In “News”last_img read more

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2013 Volkswagen CC R-line: Sage wisdom from stylish car

first_imgWhen it first came to the states, the Volkswagen CC was exactly the type of car VW could do. A few years ago, VW had all the brass schnitzels to tell the American car buying public: “Zee? Ve can make a car that iz style more than substance.” Incredibly, Volkswagen was right.When the CC came out in 2008, buyers didn’t seem to notice that it was a re-skinned previous generation Passat. (Didn’t notice or didn’t care; same diff, really.)2013 Volkswagen CC R-line (Courtesy photo)It was a four-door coupe design — and yes, I understand that’s an oxymoron — that was hot a few years ago and Volkswagen could do a quick version of their own to offer in a relatively bare marketplace. After all, around 2008, VW had their eyes on being the world’s largest automaker, and to get there in a hurry. Slapping new bodies on existing platforms and selling them as near-luxury models could boost a bottom line in a hurry, right?Fast forward to 2013, and VW’s year so far can optimistically be summed up as, “Meh.”So where then, might you ask, does the CC fit into the lineup in a rebuilding year? Perhaps there’s no room for a four-door coupe that starts at more than $30,000 — $10,000 more than a base Passat — that appeals to a small market. Think that’s not reason enough to continue with the CC? Think again.For sure, the CC is unlike any other car in the Volkswagen lineup. Styled by VW designer Oliver Stefan, who also worked on the New Beetle Cabrio, the CC represents a moment of genuine creativity in a lineup balanced equally by quirk and necessity.Sure, there are hints in the CC that it’s based on a Passat anyway. But with a longer body, raised hood line and sweeping roofline, any comparisons of the CC to a much tamer Passat only happen when you break out the measuring tape and start comparing wheelbase figures. The CC’s subtle flared wheel arches in the front and rear add to the idea that it’s just a tinge different than the flat-front trousers of the Passat. The high belt line and low roofline give the idea that the CC is actually lower to the ground than it is, adding to the coupe appeal and feeding the idea that, “no, this isn’t an ordinary sedan.”The CC is not an ordinary sedan, smart guy. It’s better looking than a normal sedan. Which is to say, there’s some sacrifice in a few areas. Visibility takes a hit with the low roofline and high belt line. It’s also a bit smashed in the back thanks to a raked back window that sacrifices real estate for an angle that completes the coupe effect. Are all of these deal breakers? Probably not. But beauty is sacrifice, don’t you know.The real story for 2013 here isn’t what the CC looks like; it looks pretty close to the same after all these years. (I’ll catch heat from VW enthusiasts for that, I know. The CC underwent a mild facelift this year, but to me, it really looks the same.) But rather, the news is that the CC gets the “R-line” treatment from Volkswagen for the first time for 2013. For the uninitiated, Volkswagen’s R is rarified air for the people’s mobiles. The Golf R, for instance, is a legend in the hatchback world. The Beetle R is a ridiculously mean bug. And the Scirocco R is so highly revered, you can’t buy it — yet. The “R-line” then is a distillation, or flirtation, of that rarified status.For 2013, the CC R-line gets the 2.0-liter turbo four, which produces 200 horsepower and roughly the same amount of torque. It’s the same engine as the standard model, and the R-line can be mated to a six-speed manual or six-speed DSG automatic with paddle shifters. The R-line slots roughly in the middle, between the standard and VR6 option that places a 280-hp six under the hood instead of the turbo four. Does the R-line hold to the pedigree of fastest in the lineup? Maybe not. Does it look the fastest with special, more aggressive front bumper and side skirts? Sure, why not?Inside there are creature comforts like 12-way heated power seats, premium sound, leatherette seats and rain-sensing wipers for the R-line badge. But let’s be honest, I had you at “aggressive front bumper” already, didn’t I? The CC isn’t cramped, it fits four adults just fine and there’s enough room in the trunk for golf clubs. What else do you need?Driving the CC is where it begins to separate from the Passat. The CC feels sporty and meaner, like a coupe would be, wholly different than a Passat. Rowing through the gears in our CC R-line tester ($33,020 as tested) was pleasurable. It’s nice to finally drive a grown-up sedan in an almost completely childish way, banging through gears and squealing tires. If there’s a drawback, it’s in the steering. Although the CC feels almost different than any other sedan, it does have a somewhat numb feel throughout the wheel like a sedan. It’s not the worst thing in the world, but it is noticeable.So how then does a coupe-driving sedan fit into VW’s plan for redemption? It might seem on the surface that it’s a luxury that’s expendable in a sales slump.Not so fast. VW’s heritage is on offering models that are too pretty and too fun to ignore. And while the CC R-line feels like it might be a stretch for the badge, it is a wholly creative animal that can bring a brand back from a slumping year.Aaron Cole is managing editor of the Aurora Sentinel. Reach him at [email protected]last_img read more

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