Bar’s Web site tops 100 million vists

first_imgBar’s Web site tops 100 million vists January 15, 2009 Regular News Bar’s Web site tops 100 million vistscenter_img With the annual number of visits to The Florida Bar’s Web site surpassing 100 million and still growing, the Communications Committee is looking for ways to improve the site and its accessibility for members and the public. Committee Chair Ray Abadin told the board that one factor in the increasing use is the rising technological savvy of Bar members, two-thirds of whom are 50 or younger.He noted that hits on the Web site were almost 37 million in 2003-04. They had risen to 106.1 million in 2006-07 and to 118.7 million for 2007-08.The most popular part of the site is the Find A Lawyer page, followed by the site’s home page, and then the Bar Journal. Next is the section in which Bar members report their CLE hours, followed by the Bar News , and the Bar’s master calendar. Bar membership surveys have shown an increasing use of technology by Bar members, Abadin said, and the Young Lawyers Division uses its Web site to communicate with members, which has resulted in a spike of visits to the site.The committee hopes to emulate that in its efforts, he said, which could include continuing efforts to phase out the printed Journal directory, since all the information in the publication is available online, where it can be more regularly updated.He invited board members to review the Web site and make suggestions for improvement, adding, “We’re going to be making significant changes to the electronic media and the data presentation to our members.”last_img read more

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Have DirecTV? You now have SEC Network+, Watch ESPN

first_imgOXFORD — Good news for SEC baseball fans with DirecTV.You now have access to the SEC Network+ and Watch ESPN apps, which is where most of the Ole Miss and Mississippi State baseball seasons will be made available.The Southeastern Conference and ESPN announced the news Thursday. It was first reported in December that a deal had been reached between ESPN and DirecTV to give customers access to the app, but it took a while for the follow-through.Ole Miss and Mississippi State traditionally offered their baseball games on in-house video services, but the advent of the SEC Network pushed all that programming to the network or the accompanying app.Mississippi State will appear on ESPN2, ESPNU or the SEC Network 11 times, but an additional 36 games are available via the app. For Ole Miss it’s 12 appearances on the network, with 33 games on the app. All games that are on the ESPN family of networks can also be viewed on the app.It starts Friday — the Bulldogs’ game against Marshall and the Rebels’ game against Wright State will both be available.It’s more than just baseball — the SEC Network has aggressively promoted how visible it has made the minor (non-football/basketball) sports on all 14 college campuses. But baseball is certainly the most important to most Mississippians.Most other major cable providers have already agreed to deals with ESPN to offer the service.last_img read more

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CSPPA partners with universities to study mental health in CS:GO

first_imgRELATED: CSPPA appoints Mads Øland as full-time CEOThe CSPPA is hoping the survey will help “advance the current lack of understanding of the factors influencing mental health in CS:GO.”In a statement, the association added: “By [using the survey], we will be in a better position to support professional players to deal with the intense demands of professional gameplay. The findings of the project may help other esports better understand the mental health of their players and highlight the importance of mental health to the broader esports ecosystem.”Esports Insider says: Mental health is a serious topic, not just in esports but universally. There are several instances of players expressing poor health in esports, not just in CS:GO, so something does indeed need to put in place to help with the turmoil of rigorous practice and travel. Hopefully, by performing this study, and by spreading more awareness, the CSPPA can ignite more conversation and ideas to help combat symptoms of stress and burnout.Listen to ESI Network, a suite of esports podcasts The Counter-Strike Professional Players’ Association (CSPPA) has partnered with the University of Chichester and the University of Winchester to conduct a survey of CS:GO players’ mental health.The survey, led by Dr. Phil Birch, Ben Sharpe, and Dr. Matt Smith, will help identify factors influencing mental health in professional CS:GO players. The CSPPA released a statement revealing that preliminary evidence found that “elite CS:GO players face significant stressors in their competitive lives.”Photo credit: CSPPARELATED: HUYA acquires broadcast rights to ESL CS:GO and Dota 2 eventsThis is said to be the first study of its kind, utilising “the expertise of researchers, professional players association, and ex-professional players and coaches.” Mental health has already been a major concern in CS:GO. Earlier this year, Astralis player Lukas “gla1ve” Rossander announced a temporary medical leave, revealing his struggle with “symptoms of stress and burnout.” His Danish teammate Andreas “Xyp9x” Højsleth also took leave, elsewhere Olof “olofmeister” Kajbker left FaZe Clan’s active roster to recover from fatigue.Shortly after gla1ve stepped down, the CSPPA released a statement on Twitter titled “We need to talk about mental health issues in professional CS:GO and esports.” The association announced plans to reach out to players and teams to discuss initiatives to improve mental health. 10 Sec ESI London – Franchised leagues in esports. CARMAC vs lurppis NextStay ESI London – Franchised leagues in esports. CARMAC vs lurppisNOW PLAYINGThis year in esports- Investments, sponsorships and deals in 2019NOW PLAYINGTEAMS wins The Clutch DigitalNOW PLAYINGHector ‘H3CZ’ Rodriguez – ESI Hall of Fame Inductee 2019NOW PLAYINGESI Hall of Fame 2019 – #ESIHOFNOW PLAYINGMarcus ‘djWHEAT’ Graham – ESI Hall of Fame Inductee 2019NOW PLAYINGHeather ‘sapphiRe’ Garozzo – ESI Hall of Fame Inductee 2019NOW PLAYINGESI London 2019NOW PLAYINGThe best MMOs in 2020NOW PLAYING Arrow Left #1 Icon Created with Sketch. Arrow right #1 Icon Created with Sketch. last_img read more

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Pharmacist denies woman miscarriage drug on moral grounds

first_img 1 of 3 The Walgreens where Nicole Arteaga was allegedly refused service by a Walgreens pharmacist who denied her prescription because it was against his ethics, shown Monday, June 25, 2018, in Peoria, Ariz. The Arizona State Board of Pharmacy will investigate the complaint of a woman who says a Walgreens pharmacist denied to give her medication necessary to end her pregnancy after her baby stopped developing. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin) PEORIA, Ariz. | The Arizona State Board of Pharmacy will investigate the complaint of a woman who says a Walgreens pharmacist refused to give her medication necessary to end her pregnancy after her baby stopped developing.The woman, who the Arizona Republic identified as Nicole Arteaga, described in a viral Facebook post how she was publicly humiliated when attempting to fill the prescription to end her pregnancy — a pregnancy she wanted, but needed to terminate because she would ultimately miscarry. She says the pharmacist refused to fill the prescription with other customers within earshot and she left the location in tears with her 7-year-old child by her side. Nicole Arteaga tells her story about how a Walgreens pharmacist allegedly denied her prescription because it was against his ethics, during an interview from inside her home in Peoria, Ariz., Saturday, June 23, 2018. The Arizona State Board of Pharmacy will investigate the complaint of a woman who says a Walgreens pharmacist denied to give her medication necessary to end her pregnancy after her baby stopped developing. (Patrick Breen /The Arizona Republic via AP)center_img The Walgreens where Nicole Arteaga was allegedly refused service by a Walgreens pharmacist who denied her prescription because it was against his ethics, shown Monday, June 25, 2018, in Peoria, Ariz. The Arizona State Board of Pharmacy will investigate the complaint of a woman who says a Walgreens pharmacist denied to give her medication necessary to end her pregnancy after her baby stopped developing. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin) Arteaga was able to fill her prescription at a different location later, and filed a complaint with the Arizona State Board of Pharmacy.Kam Gandhi, executive director at the board, said that the agency hasn’t talked to Arteaga or the pharmacist yet, but will aim to do a full investigation before the board’s next meeting in August, Gandhi said.“Obviously it’s a sensitive matter, and we have to approach it delicately,” he said. “If we get everything in order, we’ll present it at the August meeting.”Arizona is one of six states that permit pharmacists to refuse to fill prescriptions on moral or religious grounds without requiring a referral or transfer of the prescription, according to the National Women’s Law Center. The law specifically mentions abortion medication or emergency contraception, and says medical professionals like pharmacists must state their objection in writing.Gandhi said that part of the law hasn’t been interpreted by the board before.“Does it have to be presented to the patient, does it have to be at the store, or does it have to be in the pharmacist’s personnel file?” he said. “That’s what’s up in the air.”Once the investigation is presented to the board, it can determine whether to dismiss the complaint or take further action. That could include a type of warning letter, civil penalties, a voluntary surrender of license or continued education, Gandhi said.Arteaga also said she had contacted Walgreens’ corporate office. On Monday, the company was tweeting replies to individuals who were outraged by Arteaga’s post.Some customers said they were taking their prescription business elsewhere. Walgreens pushed out multiple repeated responses. In one, the company said it apologized to the patient about how the situation was handled. It also said it was looking into the matter further, while another message explained store policies.“Our policy allows pharmacists to step away from filling a prescription for which they have a moral objection,” the tweet read. “At the same time, they are also required to refer the prescription to another pharmacist or manager on duty to meet the patient’s needs in a timely manner.”The company told The Associated Press on Monday that the pharmacist in question was the only one on duty at the time, so he called another location to serve the patient.Gretchen Borchelt, the vice president of reproductive rights and health for the National Women’s Law Center, said it’s unclear how many women are affected by such laws because few may come forward like Arteaga did. Borchelt said her group has heard of women being denied prescriptions in at least 26 states since 2000.“I think it’s happening more than people realize,” she said.Tayler Tucker, a spokeswoman for Planned Parenthood Advocates of Arizona, said the organization has been advocating for change in the refusal policy since it was passed in 2009. She said the law steps into the relationship between a woman and her provider — a woman could become ill by not properly dealing with a miscarriage, she said.“We’re literally endangering people by stepping in in these ways and that definitely is a huge concern,” she said.Arteaga found out she was pregnant about two months ago and was being monitored weekly because of a prior miscarriage. Last week, Arteaga’s doctor told her that her baby had stopped developing and she would ultimately miscarry. Her doctor gave her the prescription after she opted to use medication to terminate the pregnancy instead of a procedure.“I get it we all have our beliefs,” she wrote. “But what he failed to understand is this isn’t the situation I had hoped for, this isn’t something I wanted. This is something I have zero control over. He has no idea what it’s like to want nothing more than to carry a child to full term and be unable to do so.”Information from: The Arizona Republic, https://www.azcentral.comlast_img read more

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