Urbanites are fleeing to rural communities out West

first_imgCitydwellers fleeing coronavirus have descended on rural communities across the Western U.S. (Credit: iStock)Well-heeled city slickers are looking far and wide to escape the virus. And many are settling on the remote communities of the American West.The influx of potential coronavirus carriers to small rural communities has some full-time residents worried about local outbreaks that their healthcare systems can’t handle, according to the Wall Street Journal.That’s the same dilemma facing many vacation communities outside New York City where urbanites fled in droves in recent weeks.The ski resort town of Big Sky, Montana is among the otherwise small off-season communities experiencing a surge in visitors. The local county, Gallatin County, accounts for more than a third of Montana’s 330 or so cases of COVID-19.Some community groups, like the Big Sky Chamber, are “not encouraging people to come at this time,” said CEO Candace Carr Strauss. Yellowstone Club, a resort in the town, also asked members to stay away.Late last month, Montana Gov. Steve Bullock issued a stay-at-home order and recently ordered out-of-state visitors to self-quarantine for two weeks.The Victory Ranch preserve outside Park City, Utah saw a surge in members coming out to wait out the pandemic in their cabins. It’s taxed the property’s management company, who is delivering groceries and takeout to people in their cabins. [WSJ] – Dennis Lynch This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

Read More »

Tedeschi Trucks Band Breaks Radio Silence With First Of Six ‘Fireside Sessions’ [Watch]

first_imgAfter a year long, pandemic-induced hiatus, Tedeschi Trucks Band returned to the digital stage last night from the comfort of their living room. When the behemoths of jam-rock stepped off the stage on February 29th at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, nobody could have predicted that the band wouldn’t play together again until almost a full year later.The road warriors have carved their niche into the music world with intimate live shows and rowdy, multi-night residencies. When the band announced their return to the stage with the six-part Fireside Sessions, eager fans were flooded with relief. The massive band was cut down to a core four with the husband and wife tandem of lead guitarist Derek Trucks and divine vocalist/guitarist Susan Tedeschi leading the charge alongside bassist Brandon Boone and drummer Tyler ‘Falcon’ Greenwell.To kick off the series, the core of Tedeschi Trucks Band welcomed the digital fanbase into their home for a stripped-down performance of some of their beloved tunes. Cozy vibes emanated from the glowing embers of the fireplace to the warm, wooden finish of their den. Paying homage to Butch Trucks and their roots in the Allman Brothers Band, the rare TTB quartet formation launched into Blind Willie McTell’s “Statesboro Blues” before getting back to the basics with Derek Trucks’ slide guitar introducing “Simple Things”. The rendition featured Trucks’ characteristic guitar wail and Falcon wielding mallets instead of drumsticks. The fan-favorite cut off their 2011 debut album, Revelator, epitomized the overall message of the band, which has only been reinforced by the pandemic and subsequent quarantine. The lockdown forcibly reminded the citizens of the world to try to be happy and to be grateful for our health, and the health of our friends and family (“Simple things / Make life worth living”).Tedeschi Trucks Band – 2/18/21 – “Statesboro Blues”, “Simple Things” – Fireside Sessions[Video: Tedeschi Trucks Band]Keeping the musical medicine flowing, “Misunderstood”, off 2013’s Made Up Mind, cemented the front and back lines with Derek Trucks and Susan exchanging scorching guitar licks while Falcon and Boone maintained a tight-knit rhythmic pocket. Susan’s well-rested vocals shined with glorious light as Derek’s furious finger work wove intricate melodies around her. Their call-and-response evolved into a straight shred-off, with the duo exchanging scorching solos and slathering hot sauce all over the jam.Staying on the same album, Susan’s powerful vocals revived a soulful take on “It’s So Heavy” as she switched guitars in favor of her trusted Telecaster. After the music ended, Susan voiced an inspiring message to “stay positive and keep trying our best” as she introduced the band—and the engagement’s titular fireplace—while Derek slugged some amber potable. The heartwarming relationship between Derek and Susan was on full display as they exchanged loving smiles and sheepish grins during a cover of Stevie Wonder’s “Loving You is Sweeter Than Ever”’.Before delving into Elmore James’ “The Sky is Crying”, Susan recounted a story that she heard from Duane Allman’s wife about a night that Duane took her to see “the greatest guitarist,” Albert King, and Duane was blown away, noting that she now thinks about Duane every time she plays the tune.As the song broke down, Susan Tedeschi brought home the bacon with a bluesy and soulful solo before passing the baton back to Derek to whoop up a furious cauldron of home cookin’ with his glass slide. Boone and Trucks shared a laugh after the music ended, indicative of the good feelings of the entire night—smiles and laughs all around.Next, Susan picked up her beautiful, autographed turquoise guitar for a bone-chilling performance of “Don’t Drift Away”. Although this is one of the band’s lesser-played tunes, they did play it at their last show before the shutdown at the Ryman Auditorium on 2/29/20.After dedicating a short tribute to all the people who were taken from us by the coronavirus, Susan led the quartet through a take on the crowd-favorite, “Angel from Montgomery.” The composition was written by John Prine, who unfortunately was just one of the many musical legends that was taken from us during this terrible pandemic. As the tune wound down, Susan transitioned into its frequent TTB partner, “Sugaree’”, a joint composition written by Robert Hunter and Jerry Garcia. Susan returned to “Angel from Montgomery” to close out the performance with the lyrics “To believe in this livin’ / Is just a hard way to go.”The intensity culminated with “That Did It”, a powerful vortex surrounding Susan’s vocals. At one point, Derek Trucks, who has heard his wife sing thousands of times, couldn’t keep the pleasant surprise off his face as Susan belted out the lyrics. It seemed that Derek, just like anyone who was ever heard Susan sing, was amazed that that thunderous voice could emerge from Tedeschi’s slight frame.To close out the first edition of the Tedeschi Trucks Band Fireside Sessions, the quartet laid into an impactful ‘I Want More” that drifted into improvisational territory as Boone, Tedeschi, and Trucks exchanged sizzling solos. The interplay eventually evolved into the song structure of Carlos Santana’s “Soul Sacrifice” for a heated conclusion.Susan thanked the audience, expressed her desire to play live music again soon, and wished everybody well before signing off as the credits rolled, accompanied by Leon Russell’s “A Song to You”.With great relief and anticipation, Tedeschi Trucks Band welcomed their musically famished audience into their warm and cozy home to perform a purposeful selection from their repertoire with a slimmed down unit. Susan’s voice seemed well-rested from the long hiatus-—more powerful than ever, even—and Derek’s well-practiced fingers had no problem finding the melodic grooves of yesteryear. Boone and Falcon were an unstoppable force in the backline. Thursday nights at the Tedeschi/Trucks house will be a refreshing change of pace in this music-less world and have already become the best day of the week.The pandemic has presented challenges for musicians as well as the audience of devotees. Reach out to an old friend. Check on one another. There is a light at the end of the tunnel, and it is my most sincere hope that we can make it to the other side to dance and laugh in the sunshine while stomping our feet in the muddy lawns of our favorite venues. Until next week, stay healthy and well.Setlist: Tedeschi Trucks Band | Fireside Sessions | 2/18/21Set: Statesboro Blues, Simple Things, Misunderstood, Lovin’ You is Sweeter Than Ever, The Sky is Crying, Don’t Drift Away, Angel from Montgomery > Sugaree, That Did It, I Want More > Soul Sacrificelast_img read more

Read More »

Clarke Carlisle discusses his Leeds exit and how he got revenge on Ken Bates

first_imgClarke Carlise has told talkSPORT of his relief after leaving Leeds United in 2005 and how he got one over on then-chairman Ken Bates.He joined the West Yorkshire club in 2004, months after their relegation from the Premier League, and went on to make 35 appearances, even contributing four goals.A financially-stricken United side finished 14th in the Championship and, in the following summer, new boss Kevin Blackwell allowed Carlisle to move to Watford, where he signed a three-year deal.“It was about rescuing my sanity, self-worth and my value,” the former defender told My Sporting Life of his move to Vicarage Road.“I went down to Watford, get there and get a bouquet of flowers from Ken Bates, who is the [Leeds] chairman. This bouquet of flowers says: ‘Good luck at Watford, you’ll need it.’“[I’m thinking] oh, alright that was a bit touché Ken but we’ll take that.“You’ve got to bear in mind Leeds put a clause in the contract – which I have never seen before or since on a permanent transfer – that I can’t play against them the following season. So in the two league fixtures – and when we come to meet them in the play-off final – I wasn’t allowed to play.”Rather typically, Blackwell’s Leeds finished in fifth place while Aidy Boothroyd’s Hornets were third and the two sides would meet again in Wales, battling for promotion to the top flight.Carlisle, who made 32 league appearances that season, continued: “As luck would have it, I was injured for the play-off final anyway, so I couldn’t play.“Play-off final, Millennium Stadium, Watford v Leeds, we battered them.“I was in my suit in the stand but we battered them. I’d never been so happy.“I sent a bouquet of flowers to Ken Bates that said: ‘Good luck without the parachute payments, you’ll need it.’ Karma.”Clarke Carlisle sat down with talkSPORT’s Danny Kelly to discuss the highs and lows of his career, his personal life and more. Listen to My Sporting Life on Sunday (July 16) from 10pm.last_img read more

Read More »