Memorabilia in NCT tell dramatic story

first_imgThe New College Theatre has yet to see its first performance, but already the building seems to echo with audience laughter and the pleasant dissonance of a tuning orchestra. In the lobby, one can almost hear a whisper of “break a leg” or the clink of glasses at a postproduction fête rising faintly from the polished wooden floorboards. More than 100 years of theatrical history live on in the New College Theatre, and a special exhibition now on display throughout the building will help to preserve that legacy.From the lobby to the lower lounge, the brand-new building is awash in posters, rehearsal photographs, audition fliers, and commemorative plaques. The images serve as both décor and exhibit — a visual testimony to more than 100 years of Harvard theater.“These images show how historically important the theater arts have been to Harvard students,” explains Matt Weinberg, special projects consultant for the Office for the Arts (OfA) and curator of the exhibit.The exhibit includes material from the late 1880s to the present, and traces the history of Harvard theater from early Hasty Pudding productions to the current Learning From Performers series produced by the Office for the Arts.“There is such a rich tradition of performance at Harvard,” says Richard Brown ’60, who composed the music for the 1960 Hasty Pudding Show “Run for the Money” and helped select materials for display. “When you walk into this exhibit … it brings the past alive.”In one corner of the lobby, a group of 1947 Pudding actors peer intently at a dressing room mirror as they apply costume makeup for the evening’s show. On another wall, actresses from the 1909 Radcliffe Idler Club enact a scene from “The Merchant of Venice.” Next to the box office door, John Lithgow ’67 takes the stage in a production of Moliere’s “Tartuffe.” Nearby, a group of live horses prance across the Harvard Stadium in a 1906 Class Day production of “Agamemnon” by Aeschylus.“Harvard has a unique theatrical history among the world’s universities, and by means of this exhibition it is possible to give some idea of the many traditions and events that have contributed to this history,” says Fredric Wilson, curator of the Harvard Theatre Collection in the Houghton Library.The blue-green walls of the lobby not only provide a startling backdrop for the display, but also add their own voice to the narrative of Harvard theater. The color used here, “peacock blue,” is the same as the color used for the walls in 1888. Leers Weinzapfel Associates, the architectural firm handling the reconstruction, scraped through layers of old paint to find and reproduce the original hue.The exhibit continues throughout the building. Near the lounge, a silk-screen poster advertises “The Rockets’ Red Blare,” a 1972 pop opera written by James Yannatos, conductor of the Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra. Near the black box rehearsal space, photographs of stage rehearsals dating back to 1939 remind current students that the tradition of long hours and late nights has very deep roots.A large collection of photographs traces the history of the Learning From Performers series, an initiative that allows undergraduates to work closely with luminaries in the arts. From Neil Simon to the Blue Man Group, the photographs demonstrate Harvard’s commitment to providing learning opportunities for young artists.“The New College Theatre encourages student organizations and groups to achieve the highest level of learning and performance, but it also highlights the connection that Harvard has to the wider theatrical community,” Weinberg says.The Harvard Krokodiloes and the Radcliffe Pitches, two of Harvard’s oldest a cappella groups, are also featured in a special display. Both organizations maintain offices in the New College Theatre. Highlights of the display include an image of the Krokodiloes performing with Ella Fitzgerald, and a copy of an original work by Leonard Bernstein ’39 written specially for the Krokodiloes.Most of the images on display are high-quality reproductions of material found in the Harvard Theatre Collection and the Harvard Archives. Jane Knowles, librarian at the Schlesinger Library, provided images from the Radcliffe College Archives.Officers of the Harvard Krokodiloes, the Harvard-Radcliffe Gilbert and Sullivan Players, the Hasty Pudding Theatricals, and the Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club all contributed original materials or provided counsel on the exhibit.Weinberg, Wilson, and Brown collaborated with a special committee of the Office for the Arts to select the final pieces for display, and Harvard Imaging Services managed the printing process.last_img read more

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Wish Granted! Watch This Epic Trailer for Disney’s Live-Action Aladdin

first_imgMena Massoud View Comments The Grammys may be music’s biggest night, but it’s becoming a shining, shimmering, splendid one for theater fans. A trailer for the highly anticipated live-action version of Aladdin aired during the CBS broadcast. The company of Guy Ritchie’s new film includes Mena Massoud in the title role, with Naomi Scott as Jasmine, Will Smith as the Genie and Tony nominee Billy Magnussen in the brand-new role of Prince Anders. This Aladdin features the beloved original music of Alan Menken, Howard Ashman and Tim Rice, plus two new songs written with Dear Evan Hansen Tony and Grammy winners Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. Watch the vibrant trailer below and mark your calendar: Aladdin arrives in cinemas on May 24.last_img read more

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Committee vote scheduled for Senate housing finance bill

first_imgPromote stable, liquid, and efficient mortgage markets for single-family and multifamily housing; Ensure that affordable, 30-year, fixed-rate, prepayable mortgages continue to be available, and that affordability remains an important consideration; continue reading » On April 29 at 10 a.m. (ET) the Senate Banking Committee will markup its housing finance reform legislation, according to an announcement by the committee chairman, Sen. Tim Johnson (D-S.D.), and its ranking Republican member, Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho).It was just earlier this month that the senators unveiled theirhousing finance reform proposal–hailing its bipartisan backing.The new bill used the Corker-Warner bill (S.1217) as its framework andit is intended to:Protect taxpayers from bearing the cost of housing downturns;center_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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A Meet-Cute of Professional Networking and Online Dating

first_imgThe New York Times:Work and romance may seem like a bad combination, but as more work, and more romance, goes online, the two are meeting in interesting ways. LinkedUp is one startup banking on a version of the old saw that you’re likely to meet your mate at work, while eHarmony, a veteran of online dating, has decided to deploy its expertise to match job seekers with potential employers.“Elevated Careers by eHarmony,” scheduled to start in December, seeks to improve a company’s employee retention rates by looking at more than skills and resumes — companies would be more productive, and more profitable, if their workers were more satisfied and stayed at the company longer. Taking into account an applicant’s personality, how it might fit with the company’s cultureand how it might mesh with management, may help to improve both factors.…But even with eHarmony’s 600,000 married couples, there’s still plenty of skepticism about whether online dating sites work. OkCupid conducted an unannounced test recently that manipulated users’ profiles and found that what you write on your profile doesn’t have any bearing on whether another user finds you attractive.And Eli J. Finkel and Susan Sprecher, professors of psychology and of anthropology and sociology, respectively, write in Scientific American that the claims of matching sites don’t bear out in real life:“From a scientific perspective, there are two problems with matching sites’ claims. The first is that those very sites that tout their scientific bona fides have failed to provide a shred of evidence that would convince anybody with scientific training. The second is that the weight of the scientific evidence suggests that the principles underlying current mathematical matching algorithms — similarity and complementarity — cannot achieve any notable level of success in fostering long-term romantic compatibility.”Mr. Finkel and Ms. Sprecher are part of a team that wrote a longer psychology paper, summarized on Science of Us, arguing this in greater depth. What a person might find attractive on a profile may have no correlation to what they find attractive in real life, the report says, and browsing profiles “fosters judgmental, assessment-oriented evaluations and can cognitively overwhelm users, two processes that can ultimately undermine romantic outcomes.” What improves outcomes most is access to a wider pool of potentially interested (and interesting) people to connect with.Read the whole story: The New York Times More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Reuters: Petrobras could cancel two FPSO orders

first_imgBrazilian oil giant Petrobras is on the verge of cancelling two Floating Production Storage Offloading vessels orders, Reuters has reported.According to the news agency, Alexandre Lindenmeyer, mayor of Rio Grande municipality, where the FPSO units are being built, has said that the reason for the potential scrapping of the orders is the fact that the consortium building the units has asked for more cash.Reportedly, the consortium, formed by Queiroz Galvão and IESA has required an additional 10 percent on top of the originally agreed price, as Petrobras has allegedly asked for several contract modifications for the FPSO P-75 and P-77 units respectively.The Brazilian consortium is responsible for modules and integration with the hulls. The hulls of the two FPSOs were converted from Very Large Crude Carriers.Furthermore, Reuters reports, Lindenmeyer has said that Petrobras and the contractors are set to meet on Wednesday to discuss a possible resolution of the issue.The FPSO units, scheduled for delivery in 2016 and 2017, will have production capacities of 150,000 barrels per day each. The FPSOs are planned to be deployed at the Buzios field in the Cessao Onerosa area, offshore Brazil.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

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Djuric Goal To Be Reviewed By EFL

first_imgThe goal, scored six minutes into added time in City’s 2-1 defeat at Elland Road, was initially credited to Milan Djuric after the striker met David Cotterill’s left-wing corner with a powerful near-post header.However, Matty Taylor may have claimed the final touch before the ball found the bottom corner.The EFL will confirm the identity of the scorer in due course.last_img

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