Liberty Property Trust to Begin Redevelopment of Newly Acquired Industrial Building

first_imgLiberty Property Trust announced it will begin redevelopment and renovation of a newly acquired industrial building at 2626 S. 7th St. in Phoenix.The property is located within minutes of Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport and the company has rebranded the property, which it purchased in September, “Liberty Sky Harbor Center.”Work will begin in January 2013 and is expected to be complete in 2Q 2013.“The redevelopment of Liberty Sky Harbor Center comes at a time when interest is high in well-located, efficient industrial space,” said John DiVall, senior vice president and city manager for Liberty’s Arizona region.“This is more than a face lift; it’s a repositioning of the property that will be attractive for potential tenants seeking a cross dock warehouse building with expansive outside area in the Sky Harbor International Airport submarket, which is virtually non-existent today.”DiVall said he anticipates the work will begin with the demolition of a smaller office building on the east end of the property. That area is slated for an expansive parking area for trailers and outside storage.New dock doors will be installed along the south side of the building with a new concrete truck court on the south side of the property as well. The existing fencing will be relocated back to the property line on the south and southwest sides of the property and high efficiency exterior site lighting will be added.Work on the building itself will include the installation of additional dock doors on the south, east and west sides of the building and new asphalt throughout the property. Improvements will also include energy efficiency steps such as a complete roof overlay, new R-11 insulation to be added to the underside of the roof deck, native landscaping for water conservation and the use of low-VOC paint on the interior and exterior.Liberty purchased the property this fall from Emerik Properties Corp. The seller was represented by Jerry McCormick of CBRE and Liberty was represented by Bob Crum of Ross Brown Partners, who will also have the leasing assignment. The general contractor for the project is Howard S. Wright.Liberty owns approximately 2 MSF of industrial and office space in Arizona. In addition to Liberty Cotton Center, major holdings include Liberty 303 Business Park in Goodyear, the LEED Gold 8501 E. Raintree Drive in Scottsdale and Liberty Tolleson Center.last_img read more

Read More »

Airgas profit surges 34 per cent

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

Read More »

Technip charters ‘Polar Onyx’ for Angola ops

first_imgGC Rieber Shipping has secured a time charter agreement with Technip Angola for the SURF vessel Polar Onyx. The vessel will conduct SURF and construction duties in Angola. The charter starts prompt and lasts for up to two months.GC Rieber noted that the charter is in direct continuation from the previous charter in UK sector where the vessel worked for the marine solutions and specialist engineering service provider James Fisher Marine Services.“This is an interesting contract for us where the operational capabilities of the vessel and her equipment get fully utilized. Technip’s strong presence in West Africa makes the contract strategically important to us, and we look forward to cooperating with them also in this region,” says CEO Irene Waage Basili.The SX121 designed offshore construction vessel Polar Onyx was delivered in March 2014 from Ulstein Verft. The vessel is designed to operate in the SURF/Construction/IRM markets, with high capacity for flexible pipe loads.last_img read more

Read More »

Wildwood Assault Lands One in Hospital

first_imgState Troopers were notified just after 6pm that a male inmate was being taken to Central Peninsula Hospital. Soldotna Bureau of Investigation was notified and took over case responsibility. Beth Ipsen with AST said they are regarding another inmate as a suspect, but haven’t yet finished their investigation. The inmate is yet to be identified.center_img FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享A Monday evening assault at Wildwood landed one inmate in hospital with non-life threatening injuries.last_img

Read More »

EDIBLE ARRANGEMENT: Le Courtois isn’t playing with food — she’s making…

first_img Viviane Le Courtois is showing Raw, Cooked, Fermented on Monday June 13, 2016 at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinel A cast iron artichoke on Monday June 13, 2016 at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinel AURORA | Julia Child once said that, “In France, cooking is a serious art form and a national sport.”Now, more than a decade after the death of the woman credited with aggrandizing commercial cooking in America, local mixed-media artist Viviane Le Courtois is working to solidify that sentiment stateside and take it to a distinctly unique level.Late last month, Le Courtois opened a new exhibit at Denver Botanic Gardens entitled “Raw, Cooked, Fermented,” which features more than a dozen pieces of various media that use food to create art.Hanging on the naked concrete walls of the DBG’s Gates Garden Court Gallery, several maple-framed pieces coyly hide ties to the organic world. Upon examination, a series of seemingly diffident sketches depicting different home goods like pickles, kimchi and sauerkraut is revealed to be stained with the respective juice of each concoction — a sketch of giant red mustard leaves pops with a magnetizing scarlet hue. Across the room, a series of embryonic prints made with kombucha hang beside a pair of cast iron artichokes. Viviane Le Courtois’s art exhibit Raw, Cooked, Fermented is on display on Monday June 13, 2016 at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinel Viviane Le Courtois is showing Raw, Cooked, Fermented on Monday June 13, 2016 at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinel Garlics and Onions, made out of ceramics by Viviane Le Courtois at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinelcenter_img A piece named Raw, Cooked, Fermented by Viviane Le Courtois is at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinel Elliptocyte 1is a print made from kombucha etchings on Monday June 13, 2016 at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinel Le Courtois perfected her still-secret kombucha printing process in 2004 by staining zinc plates with the bacteria’s highly acidic juices. A program manager at Downtown Aurora Visual Arts by day, the Denver-based artist beams as she describes some of the smallest pieces in the new exhibit, which are comprised of several ceramic onions and garlic cloves. They’re foods her family has grown in her native Brittany, France for generations.“When I was a kid we ate tons of artichokes and cauliflower,” she says. “Foraging, cooking, art, it’s just always been a part of my life.”Le Courtois said that her fascination with the relationship between art and food started early in her childhood, when her mother scolded her for picking flowers out of the garden to make paint. “Because that was all I had,” she says. “I had no art supplies, so I had to find my own.”But it wasn’t until she was 19 years old and a student at art school in Niece, France that Le Courtois’ professional blending of food and art began to flourish. One of her first works at school involved making sculptures out of chewed up licorice roots.A Denver resident for more than 20 years, Le Courtois is always working on a project that brings the kitchen into the studio — or vice versa. She’s typically working on some sort of new “kitchen experiment,” like growing a kombucha culture for her next round of zinc prints, or nursing one of her various jarred goods in her new house in the East Montclair neighborhood.It’s that lifestyle that made Le Courtois’ work ideal for the gardens ongoing exploration and exhibition of the intersection between art and food, according to Kim Manajek, associate director of exhibitions, art and interpretation at DBG.“It is a beautifully cohesive exhibition that is a perfect fit for Denver Botanic Gardens’ Gates Garden Court Gallery,” Manjek said in a statement.Despite the divine match, Le Courtois said that she was challenged by DBG’s stipulation that she couldn’t use any truly live material in the exhibit.“The show had to last for two months, and they didn’t want anything in the display case that could attract bugs,” she said. “I think it was a challenge for me to not work with any live material in a place that has a bunch of live things.”Le Courtois will be leading a workshop at DBG at the end of July on how to grow your own art supplies. Her completed works will be on display daily at the Gates Garden Court Gallery through the end of July. Viviane Le Courtois is showing Raw, Cooked, Fermented on Monday June 13, 2016 at Denver Botanic Gardens.Photo by Gabriel Christus/Aurora Sentinellast_img read more

Read More »