Fouls and low depth stop Gophers comeback attempt in NCAA tournament

first_imgThe Blue Raiders guard said after the game that his team was able to easily score on Minnesota.“I felt like this was the perfect time for me to step up,” Upshaw said. “Shoulder the offense and try to get everybody else going. Pitino admitted that depth was a significant problem for the team.The team was already low on depth after senior guard Akeem Springs suffered a torn Achilles in the Big Ten tournament.In the second half, the Gophers’ leading scorer, Nate Mason, suffered a hip injury but still played a majority of the second half.He was forced to leave Mason in even as the guard was injured and in the middle of one his worst offensive performances all season. Mason finished the game 2-10 on field goal attempts but played 38 of 40 minutes in Thursday’s loss.“We were not very deep late in the season and that caught up to us,” Pitino said. “When you can’t sub, [it’s] really, really hard because [Mason] needed a break.”Except for Michael Hurt, who played three minutes, every Gophers player finished with one or more foul.Lynch, Murhpy and Curry ended the game with four fouls each.After the game, Blue Raiders head coach Kermit Davis said getting Minnesota’s big men into foul trouble early was key.“Foul trouble affected us a lot,” Murphy said.“[It] may have made us a little bit less aggressive going down the stretch, soit really hurt us.” Fouls and low depth stop Gophers comeback attempt in NCAA tournamentMinnesota lost by 11 after bringing the game against Middle Tennessee State within fourChris DangSophomore forward Jordan Murphy looks to get around the Blue Raiders defense on Thursday, Mar. 16, 2017 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin at the Bradley Center. The Gophers played against Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders. Mike HendricksonMarch 17, 2017Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintMinnesota’s crowd at the Bradley Center in Milwaukee suddenly had life late in the game.The Gophers had shaved a late 17-point deficit to four in five minutes, and the Minnesota fan base was on its feet for the first time in a while.But just as the Gophers had life, Reggie Upshaw hit a 3-pointer to spark a Blue Raiders’ run, spelling an early exit for the Gophers in an 81-72 loss in the first round of the NCAA tournament. “[Upshaw’s 3-pointer] really hurt us,” said Gophers head coach Richard Pitino. “Give them credit, we couldn’t stop them.”While the Gophers were the higher seed in the game, national pundits overwhelmingly predicted that Minnesota would be upset by the 12th-seeded Blue Raiders.The game appeared over for Minnesota with 11 minutes left. The Blue Raiders were up by 16 but began to lose their lead.Amir Coffey made a 3-point shot for the Gophers and hit two free throw attempts. After back-to-back field goals by Coffey and Dupree McBrayer, plus a 3-point play from Eric Curry, it was a 4-point deficit for the first time since late in the first half.But that’s when Minnesota’s flaws leaked back into the game.Three key players for the Gophers — Reggie Lynch, Jordan Murphy and Curry — were in foul trouble and there was nothing the Gophers could do to stop Middle Tennessee State from closing out the game.“We were in that comeback, we were excited trying to get over the hump,” Coffey said. “[We were] trying to get it up and take the lead but just didn’t get there.”Upshaw — who finished the game with a game-high 19 points — scored seven straight points after Minnesota brought the game within four as he took advantage of a hobbled Mason.He extended his team’s lead to eight with 4:30 remaining, and later had three rebounds to help finish the Gophers off.last_img read more

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InFocus: Supply management tossed out; farm bill fails

first_imgOn June 20, 2013, the U.S. House of Representativesvoted to remove the Dairy Market Stabilization Programfrom the dairy reform provisions proposed in the farm bill ona 291-135 vote.advertisementadvertisement At first, the vote seemed like a defeat for thosewho had advocated for the Dairy Security Act for more thantwo years. But then the chamber surprised most everyoneby failing to pass the broader farm bill legislation to whichdairy reforms were attached on a 234-195 vote.Click here or on the image to download a PDF showing a district-by-district illustration of how the whole countryvoted when asked the question: Toss out supply managementfor milk production? PDlast_img

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Budget and Alaska Workforce Top Priorities for District 29 House Candidates

first_imgIncumbent House Speaker Chenault lumped his top priority into the topic of the state budget. His competition Knudsen… Knudsen: “My biggest issue is Alaska hire, I think we have too high of a percentage of non-resident workers in some of industries, oil and gas for one, fish processing is another big one, tourism is another big one, so I’d like to see more Alaskans working.“ FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The general election is one week away and District 29 candidates Mike Chenault (R) and Rocky Knudsen (D) spoke with us about their top priorities if elected.center_img Speaker Chenault(R – Nikiski): “Trying to look at what $80 a barrel oil does for the budget and what it would do to the reserves that we have in place now. And also education is still an important issue out there and trying to come up with a formula that funds education in a way that helps our kids and moves Alaska’s education of the kids forward.” District 29 represents North Kenai and voters will determine their representative on Tuesday, November 4.last_img read more

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Decriminalising possession of small amounts of marijuana

first_imgRegards,Clinton UrlingSociety of Marijuana Advocates for Reform and Treatment (SMART) Dear Editor,The current legal regime, as contained in the “Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances (control) Act”, against the possession of small amounts of marijuana, attempts to prevent a low quantum of harm to society at a very high cost. In other words, the costs imposed on the health care and welfare systems by marijuana use are negligible compared to the costs associated with enforcing current marijuana possession laws.Specifically, the provisions that mandate imprisonment as punishment are not appropriate in the circumstances. The societal interest in prohibiting marijuana possession must take into account, one the one hand, the burden that marijuana use imposes on the health care system, and, on the other, the costs incurred by society because of enforcing the current laws. A cursory observation shows that the costs imposed on the health care system by marijuana are negligible compared to the costs associated with enforcing the current imprisonment regime. While this opinion is based on observations, the State, via the Parliament, should fund and commission empirical studies to ascertain the extent of this, so as to be guided accordingly and act proportionately with respect to the penalties imposed.Additionally, it can be argued that the current laws stand in violation of the harm principle and civil liberties of individuals. As postulated by John Stuart Mill in his seminal work On Liberty: “The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilised community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others.” In this regard, a criminal sanction of imprisonment should be reserved for those whose conduct causes a risk of harm to others and infringes on the rights or freedoms of other individuals.  The choice of using marijuana is a strictly personal decision, because it is the individual who suffers the change in perception, mood and state of consciousness brought about by the use of marijuana. It is the individual who deals with the consequences of his or her decision, without disturbing or affecting the rest of society. This becomes more so admissible when taken together with the establishment of similar legislation as the recently signed Tobacco Control Bill that prohibits public smoking.It is time that our policymakers enact legislation to decriminalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana.last_img read more

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