No. 13 Utah draws inspiration from San Antonio Spurs

first_imgSALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah coach Larry Krystkowiak looked to the NBA champion San Antonio Spurs when he needed a model for his offense during the offseason. The No. 13 Utes don’t have a dominant scorer that can simply take over when needed, so he had to find another way to maximize their offensive potential.Arizona State saw the results of that Thursday night in an 83-41 loss in which eight Utah players scored at least eight points.Coaches tend to be copycats when they see peers having success, so Krystkowiak poached parts of the Spurs’ scheme and mixed it with his own motion offense. Now Utah is No. 5 in the country with a plus-16.5 scoring margin and ranks in the top eight in field goal percentage, true shooting percentage and points per shot.The offensive success has come from a completely unselfish philosophy that emphasizes sharing the ball and taking great shots. The Utes (22-5, 12-3 Pac-12) will need everything they can get from that offense with No. 7 Arizona (25-3, 13-2) coming to Salt Lake City on Saturday with a share of the Pac-12 lead on the line.“The Spurs don’t have to beat anybody individually. They just kind of do it collectively,” Krystkowiak said. “That’s what I was hoping to build. We don’t have a LeBron (James) and a bunch of guys. It can be done collectively.“On any given night we have a bunch of weapons that can hurt you,” he added. “That’s what the Spurs did. Even on nights where they shut down (Manu) Ginobili and (Tony) Parker to get some rest, their guys rose up to the occasion. I think that collective idea is pretty powerful when it comes to basketball.”The Utes have the most wins in the country by 20 or more points and have a 23.3-point margin of victory in 12 Pac-12 wins.Guard Delon Wright leads the team with 14.3 points per game, but that ranks just No. 12 in the conference. Utah has three players averaging double digits and nine averaging 3.8 points or more. By comparison, Arizona’s Stanley Johnson leads the team with 14.2 points per game and it also has three players averaging double figures. The Wildcats, however, are more top heavy with six players averaging 9.0 or more.“Seeing the Spurs do what they did to the Heat, who people thought were going to win, it kind of woke people up and (gave) a sense of urgency of how to play the game, how to play the right way,” Wright said. “Last year we were selfish, but this year guys have to look in the mirror and tell themselves they’re not going to score as many points if we want to win. Guys have to sacrifice some points if we want to win as a team.”Arizona State coach Herb Sendek got an up-close look at what that offense can do Thursday. The loss was the Sun Devils’ worst since 1998.“They are a top 10 team for a reason,” Sendek said. “They move the ball. They have good balance inside and out.”Krystkowiak has developed a system to chart each player’s shots with an emphasis on quality attempts. Each shot is given a 1 to 5 grade, with 5 being a great attempt and 1 being terrible. Players aren’t penalized for adverse situations, such as the shot clock running down, but the coaching staff goes over the results after every game. The goal is to pass up good shots for even better ones.“You can see shot qualities and we’re usually well up over four,” Krystkowiak said. “We don’t accept or tolerate the bad shots.“Kind of a selfless, ball energy. We talk about the ball moving all the time. … We’ve come a long way offensively, sharing it and relying on people and trusting the system and trusting the ball energy and we don’t take very many bad shots. I think that’s the key.”The Pac-12 regular-season title is basically on the line for the Utes on Saturday. Both teams will have two games remaining and a Wildcats victory will guarantee them at least a share of the championship.“It’s a surreal feeling because it’s all coming together now,” Utah guard Brandon Taylor said. “But it’s not a surprise. We put the work in and we worked our tails off in the summer time. It’s a good feeling to see the results we’re getting from putting all that work in.”last_img read more

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Man pinned under pick-up truck

first_imgReports coming in to WLAF News are that a man fell out of a pick-up truck on Main Street at Jacksboro this evening.  Officials say the 50-year old man was temporarily pinned under the truck at around 6:18 pm.  He is being taken to the Jacksboro Middle School where he will be flown by a med chopper to a Knoxville hospital.  (WLAF NEWS PUBLISHED – 07/30/2018-6:40PM)Share this:FacebookTwitterlast_img

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New Icebreakers Coach Tony Holcomb [PODCAST]

first_img 1080p HD Visit Advertiser website GO TO PAGE Skip 360p About Connatix V56490 Auto (360p) About Connatix V56490center_img St. Cloud Sports Year In ReviewPHOTO: Dave OverlundSartell FootballSartell topped Alexandria in the snow to snap a skid. PHOTO: Joel BaumgartenRocori FootballThe Rocori Football team took home the section 8AAAA championship in snowy Alexandria. PHOTO: Sarah MuellerRocori FootballRocori fans braved the cold to cheer on the Spartans at the State Tourney.PHOTO: Sarah Mueller, WJONRocori FootballRocori Fans at US Bank Stadium for the state semis.PHOTO: Sarah MuellerRocori FootballROCORI QB Jack Steil calls the signals for the Spartans at the State Tourney .PHOTO: Dave OverlundCathedral Hockey 2019Cathedral clobbered Greenway in a state tourney rematch .PHOTO: Dave Overlund, WJONCathedral HockeyCathedral takes 6A Title.PHOTO: Dave Overlund Cathedral HockeyJack Smith warms up before Cathedral’s semifinal game against Hermantown.PHOTO: Dave Overlund (AM 1390 Granite City Sports)Apollo vs Sauk Rapids-RiceApollo girls hoops takes on the Storm in Sauk Rapids.PHOTO: Dave OverlundSartell Youth Hockey WildThe MInnesota Wild came to Sartell for their Youth Hockey Spotlight. PHOTO: Dave Overlund, WJONMike Modano SartellMike Modano behind the Sabres’ bench.PHOTO: Kelly McCarneySartell-St.-Stephen-Dance-Team-2-Courtesy-Kelly-McCarneySartell Dance at State. PHOTO: Roger MischkeSauk Rapids WrestlingSauk Rapids-Rice wrestler Andrew Wollak won his 100th match. PHOTO: Dave OverlundApollo BasketballThe Apollo boys basketball team celebrates their section title.PHOTO: Dave Overlund Apollo BasketballApollo captures section title. 720p HD 1/1 The St. Cloud Icebreakers named Tony Holcomb their new head coach on Monday. Holcomb replaces Mark Chamernick, who is leaving for a job in Warroad.In the podcast, Holcomb talks about how familiar he is with St. Cloud, how much he knows about the current Icebreakers roster, his coaching philosophies and the growth of girls hockey in Minnesota over his 20 years of coaching.”Hang Up and Listen” airs Monday through Friday from 1-2 p.m. on WJON.last_img read more

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Health insurers just say no to marijuana coverage

first_imgPatients who use medical marijuana for pain and other chronic symptoms can take an unwanted hit: Insurers don’t cover the treatment, which costs as much as $1,000 a month.Once the drug of choice for hippies and rebellious teens, marijuana in recent years has gained more mainstream acceptance for its ability to boost appetite, dull pain and reduce seizures in everyone from epilepsy to cancer patients.Still, insurers are reluctant to cover it, in part because of conflicting laws. While 21 U.S. states have passed laws approving it for medical use, the drug still is illegal federally and in most states.But perhaps the biggest hurdle for insurers is the U.S. Food and Drug Administration hasn’t approved it. Major insurers generally don’t cover treatments that are not approved by the FDA, and that approval depends on big clinical studies that measure safety, effectiveness and side effects.That research can take years and millions of dollars. And while the FDA has approved treatments like Marinol that contain a synthetic version of an ingredient in marijuana, so far, no one has gained approval for a treatment that uses the whole plant.As a result of the obstacles, advocates for medicinal marijuana say insurers likely won’t cover the drug in the next few years. In the meantime, medical marijuana users — of which advocates estimate there are more than 1 million nationwide — have to find other ways to pay for their treatment.Bill Britt, for instance, gets his supply for free from a friend whom he helps to grow the plants. Britt lives mostly on Social Security income and uses marijuana every day for epileptic seizures and leg pain from a childhood case of polio.“I’m just lucky I have somebody who is helping me out, but that could go away at any time,” said Britt, 55, who lives in Long Beach, California. “I am always worried about that.”Insurers have not seen enough evidence that marijuana is safe and more effective than other treatments, said Susan Pisano, a spokeswoman for America’s Health Insurance Plans, an industry trade group.Marijuana’s Schedule I classification under the federal Controlled Substances Act makes it difficult to conduct clinical studies that might provide that evidence. The classification means the drug is considered to have a high potential for abuse and no accepted medical use. And that means extra precautions are required in order to study it.Researchers have to apply to the FDA to approve their study. Public Health Service, another arm of the Department of Health and Human Services, also may review it, a process that can take months.The Drug Enforcement Administration has to issue a permit after making sure researchers have a secure place to store the drug. Researchers also have to explain the study plan to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, or NIDA, another agency within Health and Human Services.And researchers have to use marijuana supplied by NIDA, which contracts with the University of Mississippi to grow the only federally sanctioned source of the drug. That can limit the options for strains of marijuana researchers can study.On top of that, researchers must find a location where the marijuana can be smoked or vaporized and scientists can monitor the patients afterward. That’s no easy task, especially when dealing with public universities.“The word ‘marijuana’ is just so politically radioactive,” said Dr. Sue Sisley, a University of Arizona psychiatrist who is trying to study the drug as a possible treatment for military veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.The American Medical Association has called for a change in marijuana’s classification to one that makes it easier for research to be conducted. The current classification prevents physicians from even prescribing it in states where medical use is permitted. Instead, they can only recommend it to patients.There is no easy and cheap way to get the drug legally. Patients in states where medical marijuana is legal can either grow it or buy it from government-approved dispensaries.At dispensaries, an eighth of an ounce, which produces three to seven joints, costs between $25 and $60, said Mike Liszewski, policy director for Americans for Safe Access, which advocates for safe and legal access to therapeutic cannabis. He noted that such an amount may not last long for patients who use the drug regularly to control pain or before every meal to help their appetites. Those patients might spend $1,000 a month or more.Patients may get a price break from their dispensary if they have a low income, but that depends on the dispensary.Growing marijuana costs less but takes three or four months. And success depends on a number of factors, including the grower’s skill. And there are other problems: Britt, from Long Beach, California, tried growing it in his backyard only to have thieves steal it.Allen St. Pierre, executive director of the nonprofit National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, or NORML, thinks insurers may eventually cover vaporized or eaten forms of marijuana. But he says when that happens depends, in part, on factors like who wins the 2016 presidential election.Even if the FDA approves medicinal marijuana, there’s no guarantee that insurance coverage will become widespread. Big companies that pay medical bills for their workers and dependents decide what items their insurance plans cover. They may not be eager to add the expense.Meanwhile, patients like Kari Boiter, 33, continue to get medical marijuana however they can. Boiter has a genetic disorder that causes pain, nausea and vomiting, and she uses marijuana she helps grow in a cooperative garden to control the symptoms.Boiter, who lives in Tacoma, Washington, and is unemployed, said she’d have to go back to largely ineffective prescriptions, or do without treatment if the cooperative went away.“It would be really hard for me,” she said.Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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As O.J. resurfaces, a pressing question arises: Why now?

first_imgNEW YORK – It may be about more than the money. Experts say that in writing a book about how he hypothetically could have committed murder, O.J. Simpson may be trying to recapture the limelight. Or maybe, just maybe, he is trying to get something off his chest. Even his own publisher, Judith Regan, has pronounced the book Simpson’s confession, saying in a statement Friday that she has been told by experts that killers often confess first in hypothetical fashion before they come clean. “For many of them,” she said, “it is the only way to tell the truth.” The book, “If I Did It,” is due out Nov. 30, and Regan will interview the former football star in a two-part, sweeps-month showcase on Fox television Nov. 27 and 29. The interview is billed as a hypothetical discussion of how Simpson might have killed his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman in 1994. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESurfer attacked by shark near Channel Islands calls rescue a ‘Christmas miracle’The strangest publishing sensation of the year has raised the question of why: Why would Simpson write such a thing? Psychologists and criminal justice experts said the reason is almost certainly deeper and more complex than money. While financial details of the book and interview have not been made public, Regan said she had been told the money would go to Simpson’s children. And the victims’ families can try to go after the proceeds to help cover the still-unpaid $33.5 million judgment against him in the wrongful-death lawsuit he lost in 1997. Instead, the experts said, the book may amount to narcissism: A man who dodged tackles in the NFL, dashed through airports in car-rental ads, yukked it up in movies and starred in the trial of the century may be hungry for the attention again. Whether Simpson committed the murders or not, “he’s trying to get back some of the limelight,” argued James Alan Fox, a professor of criminal justice at Northeastern University in Boston. “And this is the only way he can do it.” “It’s a tease,” Fox added. “In the end, I doubt that he’s going to say, `This is how I did it.’ It’s always a tease. He’ll stand behind his facade of innocence. He just wants the crime of the century to span more than one century.” At the same time, experts said, the book could really be the truth – carefully veiled, but the truth nonetheless. Saul Kassin, a professor of psychology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, said it is true that interrogators trying to coax confessions from suspects sometimes ask them to reconstruct crimes hypothetically. He said it is possible Simpson is offering a false confession. People in criminal cases, guilty and innocent alike, have been known to confess to things they didn’t do, for all sorts of reasons, including coercion or a guilty conscience. Or, Kassin said, Simpson could be offering a true confession, couching it just in case. “People sometimes do this just to get it off their chest, as a means of release, as a catharsis,” Kassin said. “We’ll just never know.” The National Enquirer quoted a source familiar with the book as saying Simpson writes of angrily confronting his ex-wife over an alleged affair, blacking out and then coming to with a knife in his hand and the two bodies nearby. If Simpson’s goal was to return to the national conversation, he appears to have achieved it. Word of the project brought down abuse on Simpson and disgust for his publisher.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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