North Bergen to offer rapid, antibody COVID-19 testing for their frontline…

first_img North Bergen to offer rapid, antibody COVID-19 testing for their frontline responders By John Heinis – April 24, 2020 2:58 pm 0 Bayonne Bayonne man pepper sprayed, arrested after punching cop in the face, authorities say CommunityNewsNorth Bergen/Guttenberg Bayonne RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleAfter just 37 new COVID-19 cases in 7 days, Hoboken says backlog will skew dataNext articleMurphy issues executive order allowing security deposits to be used for rent payments John Heinis Facebook Twitter Bayonne TAGScoronavirusCOVID-19first respondersnorth bergen emsnorth bergen police SHARE Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter CarePoint Health reaches deal for Cigna Health Insurance to join their network The Township of North Bergen is announcing that their police department, Emergency Medical Services, and frontline employees will receive rapid, antibody testing for COVID-19. The North Bergen Police Department. Photo via Facebook.By John Heinis/Hudson County View“The individuals dealing with the general public must be COVID-19 free to ensure the safety of our residents,” Mayor Nick Sacco said in a statement.“Knowing that our front line personnel are free of this deadly virus enables us to better allocate resources and personnel to maintain services and do so in a safe and responsible manner.”The 15-minute tests will be administered to police, EMS and other township frontline personnel at the North Bergen Recreation Center.All responders will be required to wear personal protective equipment and adhere to strict distancing guidelines.To date, 13 North Bergen police officers have tested positive since the onset of the pandemic, with eight officers already being cleared to return to work.Based on data compiled by the New Jersey Department of Health, there are 12,645 confirmed COVID-19 patients in Hudson County and 606 deaths as of Thursday, the second and third most in the state by county, respectively. Bayonne man busted with cocaine, heroin, semi-automatic handgun after fleeing from copslast_img read more

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Battle for hearts and minds begins

first_imgEnlargement Commissioner Gunter Verheugen denies that the information strategy is designed to combat a wave of anti-enlargement tub-thumping by populists across the EU such as Austria’s Jorg Haider and his xenophobic Freedom Party.Verheugen insists the information campaign was a priority even before the far-right’s electoral success in Austria. But concern about the negative impact of taking in up to 13 new countries with a combined population of around 170 million and where the average income is less than half current Union levels is not confined to the Union’s right-wing parties.Even Germany and Austria’s centre-left Social Democrats want protective measures to stem the potential flow of workers from countries bordering the EU after enlargement. Given Germany’s own experience as it struggled to absorb former east German citizens, winning the political argument in favour of enlargement will be a tough task. Success will depend as much as on what sort of concrete safeguards the Union can provide to those living in border areas, who will be most affected by expansion, as to the warm words used in the information campaign.To ensure the positive message about expansion gets across, the Commission is planning the biggest media campaign since its 200-million euro publicity drive for the single currency. But the money will be shared between the 15 current EU member states and the 13 applicant countries. Spreading the cash over seven years means there will only be an average of 4 euro a year per person to spend. As a result, a small country such as Latvia with a population of 2.5 million will get under 100,000 euro annually, while Poland will receive 1.5 million euro.The Commission has already indicated that the funds will be targeted at key countries and groups in society to achieve maximum impact for the money available. It intends to focus the campaign on key opinion formers such as business executives, parliamentarians, trade unionists and educationalists, although special attention will have to be paid to those with the most to lose from enlargement like people in border regions, farmers and workers in industries being restructured.The Commission’s strategy involves taking a strongly decentralised approach to the campaign, allowing each country to decide which aspects of the enlargement debate it wants to emphasise to ensure that it tackles the most pressing issues in each particular situation. This is particularly important given that the campaign will not only be aimed at overcoming suspicions in existing EU member states about the effects of enlargement. Levels of support for joining the Union in the applicant countries themselves are a more sensitive issue and, in some countries, the majority is favour of membership is perilously slim.While in existing EU member states, the decision to take in a new country has to be approved by national parliaments, most of the candidate countries have committed themselves to holding a referendum on entering the Union. As close votes in the EU have shown, the views of groups with the most to fear from joining the Union could be crucial in deciding the result.last_img read more

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