How John Flomo Rose to Prominence

first_img“Dreams are what keep us going, but the passion to pursue is what matter most,” says S. Karie Walker, popular known as John Flomo. “It is upon this belief that I have built myself a reputable career as an actor from poverty to success.”Recently, John and his fellow comedian Isaac Sunday Sieh, another famous locally-based actor commonly known as Paul, signed a contract worth more than US$ 24,000 with telecommunications operator Cellcom, to be the company’s brand ambassadors.After signing with the company, comedian John Flomo bought himself a brand new car.“I endured lots of hardship just to reach this far, and this is just the beginning of my accomplishments,” John said excitedly.Arguably one of the hottest new Lollywood stars, John Flomo has said that his passion to succeed as a comedian in Liberia was marred by disappointment and setbacks. But regardless of the pains, “hope” kept his dream alive.“Life was hard, so hard that at times I had to beg people just to earn a living. I could not even afford money to buy L$15 candle, and sleeping with friends was an every day thing,” he narrated. “I was often overlooked by my peers, just because things were hard on me.”He has disclosed that poverty droved him out of the University of Liberia and there was no other option, and the only option was to focus on his career as an actor.“I was laughed at from the beginning, and people said that making movies in Liberia was useless and that there was no benefit in being a Liberian movie star,” John reflected, adding, “But they were entitled to their opinions and I didn’t have to go along with what they said. As God would have it, I didn’t give up and many Liberians have been generous and supportive of my career.“I don’t have any formal training for acting. But my talent is a gift from God and I have used it to nourish myself,” he said. “Comedy has been my passion since childhood and by the middle part of 1997, I began practicing it as a drama from group to group. But it was really difficult for me to break into Lollywood,” he admitted. His first movie, “Samaguan in Love”, went viral, and since than he has had over 30 short films to his credit.According to him, his plan is to make people laugh and there is nothing that seems serious to him.He also said that making people laugh helps them to overcome their stress and worry, giving them hope for a better tomorrow.“I’m just the way you see me in movies. It’s very difficult for me to be serious as everything that is surrounding me is comedy,” he disclosedThe comedian said, “I am also involved into charity work with the John and Paul foundation, headed by our manager Dream Debo.”He said the J&P Foundation visits the homes of the less fortunate, Ebola victims, and sick patients in hospitals.However, he said his visit to these places is just to make people laugh and as well as to share much needed assorted items (rice, soap, blankets, etc), things that will be to keep their hope alive.“I don’t have much, but this is my way of giving back to the Liberian society that has made me,” he said. “I’m the kind of person that loves everybody and will strive to be submissive always.“Critics are those that made me, since they are the ones that kept motivating me to improve every single day,” he said.“Never you give up on your dream. I will forever remain grateful to Liberians for supporting my efforts.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Libraries struggle to meet demand

first_imgAfter missing two chances in the past year to gain state funding, libraries in Los Angeles County and throughout the state are struggling to meet a massive demand for new facilities that falls far short of available funds. State and local officials have estimated a demand of $8 billion for new library facilities across the state, including $1billion in Los Angeles County alone. But one year ago this month, state voters rejected a $600 million bond measure to build new libraries. Then earlier this month, the state Legislature held in committee a proposal for a $4 billion library bond measure on next year’s ballot, dashing the hopes of library supporters who say local resources are not enough to meet the demand. `There are some that have been able to find \, but it’s a real tough go,” said Margaret Todd, the Los Angeles County head librarian, and president of the California Library Association. Todd said the county library system has been fortunate in getting support from the Board of Supervisors for at least five projects that are currently moving forward at a budgeted cost of more than $60 million. The county is planning to build more libraries in Topanga Canyon, La Crescenta, Acton/Agua Dulce, Lawndale and an unincorporated area near Whittier. The Topanga project, located on the edge of a coastal zone, was approved by the California Coastal Commission on Thursday and is moving toward a construction start date of February 2008. The La Crescenta project is scheduled to open in fall 2009. Board of Supervisors Chairman Zev Yaroslavsky said even while the county faces other pressing problems such as health care and prisons, the county recognizes the importance for finding money for libraries and other cultural resources. “Libraries are the intellectual commons for our constituency,” Yaroslavsky said. “You can go and access any information on any computer, any encyclopedia, any reference material we have at no cost. “It’s the one place where no matter how wealthy or poor you are, you have the same access to information as the next guy, and with that information you can act. In a community like Los Angeles County you can do a lot with information to improve your quality of life.” Construction on the Topanga library is supposed to start in February 2008, and the facility is supposed to open by December 2009. It will be about 11,000 square feet, and hold about 50,000 items. The $14.2 million cost is coming from the county general fund and road fund. Wendy Romano, a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County library system, said the Topanga community has no library service nearby, other than a small bookmobile that visits the area twice a week. “It’s a great community of readers,” she said, referring to a community study the library system performed in 2004. “They’re in an isolated area, and they have to leave to go out for library building service. They very much wanted spaces for children and teen activities and community meeting space.” The new La Crescenta Library, to be located at 2809 Foothill Blvd., will house about 81,000 items in 15,000 square feet. The project is budgeted at $14.6 million. But other cities are struggling to meet their needs in the absence of state funding. The city of Burbank has been hoping for years to build a new Central Library across from its current location and expand the Northwest branch on Victory Boulevard, but has been unable to obtain the funding either from the state or the city’s own funds. Jody Hidey, senior administrative analyst with the Burbank Public Library, said the Central Library project would cost at least $40 million. The city had hoped to get funding from an earlier state library bond for $350 million approved by voters in 2000, but didn’t make the cut for approved projects. Then voters rejected last year’s measure. After that, the city was hoping this year’s proposed $4 billion measure, Senate Bill 156, by Sen. Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto, would move forward. Instead it was held in committee without action, though as a two-year bill it is expected to return for debate next January. “As a city we just don’t have the finances to go ahead and build it on our own,” Hidey said. The city of Los Angeles is perhaps an exception to the rule. This year the city is completing a massive 15-year library building program at a cost of $317 million from a combination of bonds and city funds, according to library officials. In the San Fernando Valley alone, the city rebuilt 15 branches and created three new branches. “We’re really proud of the fact that this is the largest library construction program in the nation,” said Los Angeles Public Library spokesman Peter Persic. “Not only did we deliver every library that was promised to the voters, but we actually came in on time and under budget, which allowed us to add projects.” Even with that massive project completed, the city still has additional needs for more libraries. A recent survey catalogued the need for renovations or construction of 19 additional facilities throughout the city, at an estimated cost of $456 million. [email protected] (916) 446-6723 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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