Lack of 4×4 vehicle prohibiting Donegal Garda Division in flooding emergencies

first_imgHomepage BannerNews Lack of 4×4 vehicle prohibiting Donegal Garda Division in flooding emergencies News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ Huge concern still remains over Donegal Gardaí’s ability to cope with severe flooding emergencies.The entire Donegal Garda Division has no access to a 4×4 vehicle with the majority of their cars unsuitable to pass through high flood water.The Donegal GRAs Spokesperson is Brendan O’Connor.He says Gardai have a responsibilty to attend flooding events but are effectively restricted in carrying out some duties due to a lack of basic equipment:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/oconnor1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. By News Highland – January 4, 2018 Twitter WhatsApp Facebook Previous articleGoals give Fermanagh victory – Rory Gallagher ReactionNext articleAlmost 400 dwellings added to Donegal Residential Building Stock in 2017 News Highland center_img Facebook WhatsApp Harps come back to win in Waterford Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Google+ DL Debate – 24/05/21 Twitter Pinterest Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population growslast_img read more

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Florida EMS Training Criticized

first_imgMANATEE, Fla. — Chaos reigned on Halloween night after an SUV drove through a dead-end street and crashed into a Bradenton retention pond. The victims’ family and friends turned on the paramedics. There was a tense exchange near the pond, and Jones reportedly broke down in tears that night. Some classes offered by the Coast Guard cost about $100, although more specialized courses such as one offered by Dive Rescue International cost about $900. “Publicly, we would have praised him as a hero if he went in there and saved someone,” Leinhauser said. “But privately, he would have been in some trouble.” After a heated town hall meeting with the victims’ relatives, EMS officials vowed to give their paramedics better equipment such as a “throw rope” used to pull victims to shore. The cost of training is not an issue in Charlotte, said department spokeswoman Dee Hawkins. Jones could not be reached, and the county attorney’s office must sign off on any interviews he gives because of the potential of a lawsuit, Leinhauser said. In 2005, the city of Bradenton was sued by the family of a 33-year-old man who drowned in August 2004 while officers stood on the shore. But people who knew the Halloween accident victims Johnnie Schoolfield Jr., 25, and Theo Thomas, 22 just want to know: Why were the paramedics not trained or equipped to handle such an emergency? “He did everything the way he was supposed to,” Leinhauser said of Jones. But Jones’ decision not to attempt a rescue was made “by the book,” according to his supervisor, Capt. Larry Leinhauser of the Manatee County Emergency Communication Center. In Sarasota County, Assistant Fire Chief Paul Dezzi said that some paramedics are trained for water rescues and other emergencies, but primarily are used for routine medical calls. Two men from the vehicle were in the water, calling for help. As it sank, neighbors rushed over and dialed 911. Just as paramedics are not expected to run into burning buildings like firefighters would, they are not expected to jump into a pond if they are not trained in water rescue, Leinhauser said. A Manatee Emergency Medical Services lieutenant, Mark Jones, heard the call and sped to the scene; he was the first public official there. In that case, however, the officers seem to be backed by the Florida Supreme Court. There is case law that suggests emergency workers have no obligation to save a life, and a 1985 ruling indicates that government agency employees have no “duty” to save a life. But in a county with a Gulf of Mexico coastline, rivers, swamps, lakes and hundreds of retention ponds, the drownings in late October were not the first time public officials were criticized for not doing more to save someone. But after speaking with the paramedics, Poole returned with others to the pond. She noticed how murky the water was, how deep it seemed, how few lights were there and how far the vehicle must have been from the shore. Experts and local officials agree that a “gut instinct” can be a dangerous thing, especially in water rescues. At the vigil, blows were exchanged, police were called and the women ran away. Besides, he said, accidents like the one near Southeast High School are “so infrequent that it would not make sense.” His family sued, claiming the officers were negligent. Fegan’s family would not comment because the case is unresolved. When the ropes were announced at a town hall meeting in November, some people close to the family were happy to see even a small measure of change. Both men from the SUV drowned. When two Bradenton police officers arrived at the Manatee River that day, Edward Fegan was incoherent and bobbing in the water.center_img It seems like a simple matter, that people have a moral or civic duty to save someone’s life, especially if they are a police officer, paramedic or firefighter. It had been a bitter aftermath. At the meeting, Schoolfield’s mother, Joann Monts, accused the paramedics of watching the men “suffer.” Still, Manatee EMS officials are adamant that they will stick to emergency medicine instead of water rescues. Jones did not go into the water to help, and took no other action in an attempt to save the man. Neither did the ambulance crew that arrived next. When the neighbors tried to jump in, the paramedics held them back. But two months later, the woman who organized the meeting between officials and the family has taken a new view of the drownings. This sort of “cross-training” is embraced elsewhere in Southwest Florida, but Leinhauser said there is a reluctance to train paramedics in anything but their primary medical duties. Patrice Poole, who is friends with some of the family members and has worked in Palmetto, where they lived, to develop similar community forums, was as confused as everyone else. “I would love to talk,” said his mother, Elva. “Someday I will.” By then, one man had drowned. The other was alive, thrashing in the pond. There was a fight at a candlelight vigil for Thomas and Schoolfield, as their friends tried to attack two women believed to be riding in the vehicle who swam to safety and then fled the scene. Fegan eventually drowned. He was 20 feet away, but neither officer swam after him, according to the suit. But experts in the field of emergency response say it is more complicated than that, and that by trying improperly to save one life a paramedic could endanger even more. The same is true in Charlotte County, where eight staffers are trained as “firemedics” and can be called on to administer life-saving drugs, fight fires or pull someone from the water. The Florida Highway Patrol, which is investigating the accident, has not released its findings yet. “Don’t become part of the problem,” said Robert C. Krause, a paramedic and industry consultant. “That’s the first rule. If he goes in the water and something happens, now you have two victims.” While most paramedics in Southwest Florida are not specifically trained for water rescues, some are. These jack-of-all-trades first responders are given special training in different areas. In fact, had Jones or other paramedics dived in, they could have faced disciplinary action for violating a county policy that says paramedics should not act beyond their training, Leinhauser said. But in Manatee, officials are stopping short of the more extensive training that Sarasota and Charlotte counties provide for their EMS workers. There, some staffers are trained not just to treat injuries and administer medicine, they are prepared to attempt rescues at fires or in potential drownings. Jones and other Manatee EMS employees are not trained in water rescue, and did not have the proper equipment, such as a rope or flotation device, with them to attempt a rescue, Leinhauser said. “I went back and began to understand what the paramedics were up against,” she said. “At first, I questioned it. I wanted to know why they didn’t do more. But the deaths of Schoolfield and Thomas did result in some changes. Every department vehicle will be equipped with “throw ropes” or flotation devices, and paramedics will be heading soon to a Bradenton field to learn the right way to throw them. “But it was dark, the water was murky, they were far away. They had to make a fast decision. I don’t think you can blame them for this.”last_img read more

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Stealing from the children

first_imgThe thieves also deliberately damaged street lights so they were not easily spotted, Ms Rustin said.Valerie Erasmus from the Early Learning Centre, which is based at the Foundation for Community Work (FCW) in Kewtown, said their centre had been vandalised twice in one week.“We informed people about the incidents on a chat group, and four other centres responded to say that they were also hit,” Ms Erasmus said at the forum’s meeting last week.Director of FCW, Riedewhaan Allie, said the vandals had left damages worth more than R17 000. “Our telephone and electric cables were ripped out, and the floodlights were damaged. They have also ripped out one of our air conditioners and left it on the perimeter of the property. “We installed three new air conditioners in December last year, because of the heat in our training rooms. After the break-in, we had to remove the other air conditioners, and it is now being stored. “We also had to pay people to take it down, and we’ll have to pay people to install it. It’s an absolute nightmare. We are now spending R17 000 for rewiring and installing new flood lights,” Mr Allie said.He added though, that he was grateful to the neighbours who always kept a watchful eye on the property.“This is the first incident in 10 years. I was always proud of the fact that we provide employment to the community, and hence our good partnership. The people from the community know who is responsible, and we need their voice to become louder when speaking out against this. “Young people must come to their senses and put a stop to this habit, culture and practice they’ve developed. This is part of a bigger scourge affecting the community. Our fencing and gates get vandalised, simply because they can get money for their next fix.”Lucinda Wilschott from Little Children’s Nursery School in Gleemoor said their alarm was activated on Sunday April 3 and their armed response company went to investigate.“They say they checked the perimeter and that all was in order. However, when we reported for duty on Monday April 4, we noticed the gate was slightly open and four chairs were stacked up outside the toilet. They left a huge, gaping hole in the wall and took a multi-plug and crayons. “It’s really senseless to cause all that damage, and it leaves one feeling violated,” Ms Wilschott said.Audrey Swartz said their centre, Bridges Play Centre in Bridgetown, had its gate stolen in February, and since then, they had upgraded their security measures.Irma Lottering, from the Marion Institute in Bridgetown, said every day they had to move their learning materials away from the windows, as those close to the windows were often stolen.Athlone ECD Forum chairwoman and principal of Silvertown Educare, Florence Reynolds, said security upgrades and repairs had become more and more expensive.“They gain nothing from all the vandalism – it is our children that suffer, because now you have to phone the police and clean up before learning can continue,” Ms Reynolds said.The forum has appealed to the community to help them curb the break-ins. The police’s response time when a case is reported is another one of their frustrations.Colonel Clive Nicholas, acting station commander of Athlone SAPS, confirmed that a few cases had been reported.He said: “If the centres are unhappy with the response time or they experience problems, they must approach me, so that I can address the matter. “They cannot complain to others, they must come to me directly I will not be able to help if I’m not aware of the problem. I know in the past we had a challenge with our reaction times, but we now have more staff members to deal with the matter.”Ms Rustin added that the thieves also deliberately damage street lights so that they are not easily spotted.Valerie Erasmus from the Early Learning Centre, which is based at the Foundation for Community Work (FCW) in Kewtown, said their centre has been vandalised twice in one week.“We informed people about the incidents on a chat group, and four other centres responded to say that they were also hit,” Ms Erasmus said.Director of FCW, Riedewhaan Allie, said the vandals left damages worth more than R17 000. “Our telephone and electric cables were ripped out, and the flood lights were damaged. They have also ripped out one of our air conditioners, and left it on the perimeter of the property. We installed three new air conditioners in December last year, because of the heat in our training rooms. After the break-in, we had to remove the other air conditioners and it is now being stored. We also had to pay people to take it down, and we’ll have to pay people when it will be installed again. It’s an absolute nightmare. We are now spending R17 000 for rewiring and installing new flood lights,” Mr Allie said.He added though, that he is grateful to the neighbours who always keep a watchful eye on the property.“This is the first incident in 10 years. I was always proud of the fact that we provide employment to the community, and hence our good partnership. The people from the community know who is responsible, and we need their voice to become louder when speaking out against this. Young people must come to their senses, and put a stop to this habit, culture and practice they’ve developed. This is part of a bigger scourge affecting the community. Our fencing and gates get vandalised, simply because they can get money for their next fix.”Lucinda Wilschott from Little Children’s Nursery School in Gleemoor said their alarm was activated on Sunday April 3, and the armed response company they use, went to check.“They say they checked the perimeter and that all was in order. However, when we reported for duty on Monday April 4, we noticed the gate was slightly open, and four chairs were stacked up outside the toilet. They left a huge gaping hole in the wall, and took a multi plug and crayons. It’s really senseless to cause all that damage, and it leaves one feeling violated,” Ms Wilschott said.Audrey Swartz said their centre, Bridges Play Centre in Bridgetown, had its gate stolen in February, and since then, they have upgraded their security measures.Irma Lottering from the Marion Institute in Bridgetown, said every day they have to move their learning materials away from the windows, as those close to the windows are often stolen.Athlone ECD Forum chairperson and principal of Silvertown Educare, Florence Reynolds, said having to upgrade security measures and fixing their properties become more and more expensive.“They gain nothing from all the vandalism – it is our children that suffer, because now you have to phone the police and clean up before learning can continue,” Ms Reynolds said.The forum has appealed to the community to help them curb the break-ins. The police’s response time when a case is reported, is another of their frustrations.Colonel Clive Nicholas, acting station commander of Athlone SAPS, confirmed that a few cases had been reported.He added: “If the centres are unhappy with the response time or they experience problems, they must approach me so that I can address the matter. They cannot complain to others, they must come to me directly, a I will not be able to help if I’m not aware of the problem. I know in the past we had a challenge with our reaction times, but we now have more staff members to deal with the matter.”ok rmRn news ECDCaption: Representatives from the Athlone Early Childhood Development (ECD) Forum, shared their frustration about regular break-ins at their facilities at their latest forum meeting. The Athlone ECD Forum has 16 affiliated educare centres. HAZEL ALLIES-HUSSELMAN Principals from 16 educare centres affiliated to the Athlone Early Childhood Development (ECD) Forum have expressed their frustration about thieves and vandals targeting their facilities.They say it seems that thieves see educare centres as easy targets, and that it’s becoming more costly for them to secure and repair their crèches at a time when parents are struggling to pay their children’s fees.Within the past three weeks, no fewer than six of the centres were broken into and vandalised.Build a Better Society (Babs) centre in Kewtown lost two computers in one week.“The thieves lifted the grill, broke the burglar bar and even tried to steal our back-up battery. “Now we have to redo all our information. We had to fix the damaged property on the same day, and replace the computer. A few days later, the second computer was stolen in the same way,” said Estell Rustin, a Babs administrator, referring to two break-ins at the centre on Wednesday April 13 and Thursday April 21.last_img read more

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DYFI’s Mission on Flood Relief and Fisheries Assistance Lifeboat

first_imgAttingal: D.Y. for flood relief and aquaculture assistance. The AFI Attingal Block Committee made the mini lifeboat available. Bought a mini lifeboat called ‘Ax Explorer 300’.Chairman M. in the pool at the Math in the 29th Ward to City Council Kotti. Block Secretary RV Vishnu at Pradeep Lifeboat’s DYFI Atting Ndra handed over and inaugurated.There are several ponds in the town which are part of the aquaculture industry. The F.I.U. Fish fry from the city council this year as part of the plan The investment was made in cash. Landing in the pool during adverse weather conditions can be very stressful. The call is rising.Immediate response to natural disasters such as floods The boat will be very helpful in carrying out the work. Currently trained Youth Brigadiers Attingal Block Committee Under the U key.Buy large lifeboats capable of carrying more people Block Secretary Vishnu Chandra informed that there is a plan. Block Executive Member Music, Treasurer Prashanth, Regional Committee Member Such as Ratheesh, Sharath, Mithun, Vineeth, R.K. Shyam was the first to leave.last_img read more

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