Auburndale girls basketball remains unbeaten with win over Edgar

first_imgApaches outscore Wildcats by 16 in second half to move to 4-0By Paul LeckerSports ReporterAUBURNDALE — The Auburndale girls basketball team pulled away in the second half, outscoring Edgar by 16 points over the final 18 minutes in a 45-30 nonconference win on Monday night at Auburndale High School.The Apaches are now 4-0, and Edgar falls to 3-2.Paiton Richardson scored 18 points on the strength of making 8 of 11 free throw attempts, and Taylor Gotz had 12 points and 10 rebounds for the Apaches.Auburndale led 19-17 at halftime before outscoring the Wildcats 26-13 in a dominating second half.Tianna Borchardt scored 14 points to lead Edgar.Auburndale hosts Stratford on Friday.(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com)Apaches 45, Wildcats 30Edgar 17 13 – 30Auburndale 19 26 – 45EDGAR (30): Macey Wirkus 4-6 0-1 8, Tianna Borchardt 4-11 6-8 14, Tiana Weatherby 0-3 2-4 2, Dana Heidmann 2-9 1-1 5, Kamryn Butt 0-1 0-0 0, Lindsey Schneeberger 0-1 0-1 0, Courtney Mueller 0-2 1-2 1, Alexandria McKibben 0-2 0-0 0. FG: 10-35. FT: 10-17. 3-pointers: 0-8 (Weatherby 0-1, Borchardt 0-2, Heidmann 0-5). Rebounds: 17 (Wirkus 8). Record: 3-2.AUBURNDALE (45): Mackenzie Raab 0-1 0-0 0, Brooke Anderson 1-3 0-0 2, Cassie Mitchell 2-3 0-0 4, Ashley Peplinski 0-1 0-0 0, Allison Linzmeier 2-8 0-0 4, Rachael Bolder 0-0 0-0 0, Slyviann Momont 1-3 1-2 3, Paiton Richardson 5-18 8-11 18, Taylor Gotz 6-9 0-1 12, Hannah Bolder 1-3 0-0 2. FG: 18-49. FT: 9-14. 3-pointers: 0-2 (Anderson 0-1, Peplinski 0-1). Rebounds: 31 (Gotz 10). Record: 4-0.last_img read more

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TB toolkit for SA companies

first_img5 June 2008The Global Health Initiative of the World Economic Forum (WEF) and pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly have launched a new toolkit that aims to boost the involvement of South African companies in tackling tuberculosis (TB) in the country.The announcement, made at the World Economic Forum on Africa in Cape Town this week, comes as South Africa faces an emerging threat of TB/HIV co-infections and fatal drug-resistant strains of the disease.In a statement on Tuesday, the WEF said the toolkit was developed in collaboration with the Lilly MDR-TB partnership, together with inputs from national and international partners, including private sector representatives.The toolkit provides concrete guidelines to help South African companies rapidly increase their TB control programmes by adopting a joint approach to tackling both TB and HIV.With some 70% of TB patients in South Africa also infected with HIV, the importance of an integrated approach to care is clear, and the South African government has recognised the importance of engaging the private sector to achieve its TB case detection and treatment targets.South African companies have the opportunity to catalyse effective public-private partnerships to facilitate successful patient and programme management, lessening the economic impact of TB, which currently leads to a decline in worker productivity estimated at US$13-billion (R100.7-billion) annually.“Businesses have a fundamental responsibility towards both their employees and the wider community, and for preservation of their long-term interests by ensuring the national development of human capital to drive economic growth,” said Eli Lilly Corporate Affairs and Communications vice president Alex Azar. “Tuberculosis has the capacity to undermine all of this.”Shattering the cycleAccording to the WEF, the TB toolkit aims to shatter the cycle of transmission that so often defines the gravity of TB. By intercepting the progression of the disease and its lethal synergy with HIV/Aids, businesses can better leverage their existing health infrastructures and management tools and resources to greater effect.Combined with the technical expertise and knowledge available under South Africa’s national TB programme and the national Aids control programme, companies can provide a critical mass of resources for successful TB control.“It’s a disturbing paradox to think that people should die from a curable disease like tuberculosis,” said Dr Shaloo Puri, head of the India Business Alliance, and India and tuberculosis adviser at the Global Health Initiative of the World Economic Forum. “The sooner South African businesses start awakening to the extent of the problem, the sooner they can understand the associated risks in the workforce and to their business.”Community engagementOn a practical level, the toolkit will help companies increase opportunities and activities in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of TB/HIV co-infections in the workplace.These measures will in turn help alleviate the burden and costs associated with absenteeism, disrupted workflow and reduced productivity.By engaging proactively with the community, which forms a key component of the overall business environment, businesses can offset the marginal cost of partnering with local stakeholders with the huge benefits they will reap through greater efficiency in the workplace and the good will in the community.Although South Africa represents only 0.7% of the world’s population, it has 28% of the global number of HIV-positive TB cases.“South African business leaders must start to recognize the crucial role they can play in TB care and the importance of the workplace setting as a win-win setting for TB control,” the WEF says.“Despite being preventable, treatable and curable, TB continues to devastate the continent. Unless individuals and organizations unite in advocacy and action, everyone stands to lose.”SAinfo reporter Would you like to use this article in your publicationor on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Ottawa womens shelter praises tough domestic violence penalties under proposed Bill C75

first_imgTodd Lamirande APTN NewsAn Ottawa women’s shelter is applauding the Liberal government’s plan to toughen the laws around intimate partner violence.Last week, Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould introduced Bill C-75, which aims to modernize the criminal justice system, reduce court delays and crack down on domestic violence.Irene Compton, program manager at Minwaashin Lodge, says 100 per cent of the clients are survivors of intimate partner violence.“A lot of them are abused themselves and they haven’t had the chance to go on their healing journey,” said Compton, adding that men are almost always the perpetrators. “There’s not enough supports for them. Maybe they are disconnected from their culture for whatever reasons.”Under Bill C-75, an accused could be denied bail and kept behind bars until trial, especially if he or she has a history of abuse.The onus will be on the accused to prove he’s not a continuous threat to his victims.There will also be harsher penalties for choking a partner, which Compton says is one of the most prevalent forms of abuse.Compton says Bill C-75 is a good start, but that more work needs to be done to help men.“We need more men’s organizations,” she says. “We need a men’s lodge here in Ottawa.”last_img read more

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