Black mom and white daughter address strangers’ comments in viral video

first_imgA GoodYear’s PhotographyBy NICOLE PELLETIERE, ABC News(DALLAS) — A mother is speaking out about the false assumptions that are made about her as a Black parent to a white child.On Aug. 26, Jeena Wilder of Dallas, Texas, and her 6-year-old addressed the comments in a viral video shared with Wilder’s 90,000 Instagram followers.“There were specific questions people would ask like, ‘Are you the nanny? Are you babysitting these kids?’” Wilder told “Good Morning America.” “No. These are all my children…all four of them.”“Instead of thinking of other avenues on how people can become mothers, they automatically assume,” she added. “It’s saddening.”Jeena and Drue Wilder first had their daughter placed with them four years ago after her biological parents were no longer able to care for her. The Wilders, who also have a biological 7-year-old, 3-year-old and another 6-year-old, officially adopted their daughter in October 2019.Jeena and Drue Wilder first had their daughter placed with them four years ago after her biological parents were no longer able to care for her. The child’s biological parents are related to dad, Drue, so it was a kinship adoption, Wilder explained.The Wilders, who also have a biological 7-year-old, 3-year-old and another 6-year-old, officially adopted their daughter in October 2019.“She’s really sweet and super forgiving and is the happiest child,” Jeena said. “She loves being around people and she is my social butterfly.”Wilder shares her journey on Instagram, where she also talks about transracial adoptions; emphasizing how she has the modern all-American family.Wilder’s video of herself with her daughter has been viewed by more than 57,000. Many parents commented, revealing how it resonated with them.Jeena and Drue Wilder of Dallas, Texas, first had their daughter placed with them four years ago after her biological parents were no longer able to care for her. The child’s biological parents are related to dad, Drue, so it was a kinship adoption, Wilder explained.“I always get mistaken for my daughter’s nanny,” one wrote. “She’s half Indian like me & half Caucasian like Daddy, but she’s still all mine!”“As the biological mom of biracial girls I’ve ALWAYS been asked if I was their mom,” another mom wrote.Wilder said she hopes to inspire more BIPOC (Black, indigenous and people of color) to adopt. “Then, it will not only be the norm,” she added. “But we will see more children getting adopted.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More »

Highlights of the Week – Readers’ Choice

first_imgInvestigation Launched After Fatal Dredging AccidentThe body of Floris Heeren, a 23-year-old Belgian crew member of the “Juan Sebastian de Elcano”, who died after falling off his ship Monday, November 3rd, has been recovered and brought to a funeral parlor, reported the abs-cbnnews.Southampton Port Ready for GiantsAssociated British Ports’ Port of Southampton is ready to handle the biggest ships in the world today and long into the future after a £40 million dredging project.Boskalis Acquires Stake in FugroRoyal Boskalis Westminster N.V., a leading global maritime services company operating in the dredging and inland infra, and offshore energy sectors, has acquired a 14.8% stake in Fugro N.V.Official Start of the New Suez Canal ProjectHead of the Suez Canal Authority (SCA) Mohab Mamish and United Arab Emirates Minister of State Sultan Ahmed al-Gaber earlier this week gave the green light for the start of dredging works on the new Suez Canal project.Steel Cutting Ceremony for Dredger “Mahury”The steel cutting ceremony for the new project, the 1.840 m3 twin screw trailing suction hopper dredger “Mahury”, will take place at MTG Dolphin on 25th of November 2014.Dredging Today Stafflast_img read more

Read More »

The City can capitalise further on its reputation for legal services

first_img Stuart Popham is chairman of TheCityUK When I heard Kenneth Clarke say: ‘The City of London is a legal centre – not just a financial one,’ I raised a cheer. He was speaking at my alma mater, Clifford Chance, at an event arranged by the TheCityUK, with the support of the Law Society and the Bar Council. Earlier, he had said: ‘Law as an industry has in the past sometimes felt itself to be something of an overlooked Cinderella in its treatment by government.’ This is quite so. While the politicians and much of the City have been debating the causes of global financial crisis and the banking review, a world-class and export-led home-grown success story was waiting patiently to be told. At the latest count, the legal sector is worth £23.1bn or 1.8% of the UK’s gross domestic product. For those interested in the balance of payments, it is worth a net £3.2bn in exports to the UK – nearly three times more than a decade earlier. This is a major contribution to the nation’s coffers; one which the government has the duty to nurture. I know from my own experience how financial services centres can only thrive if they have the right legal framework to resolve commercial disputes. We are fortunate that the UK, and London in particular, already has this framework and the people to make it a success. One of TheCityUK’s roles is to demonstrate the indivisibility of the mechanisms that make this success: the range of languages, professions, and experts to provide tailored services across the dispute resolution field. We have an envied reputation for the fair, effective and transparent resolution of international commercial disputes. The lord chancellor also told the 100-strong invited audience: ‘I am prepared to wear out much shoe leather promoting the UK as lawyer and adviser to the world, particularly in areas where protectionist regulations remain an impediment.’ This too was a welcome commitment, and one where a true public-private partnership is essential if we are to make the most of our competitive advantages. The industry’s participation and direction, through the recently launched Action Plan, will be vital to identify and break down trade barriers. As an industry, the legal services sector should welcome the commitment to involve representatives from its professional bodies in visits and trade delegations, including prime ministerial missions and the forthcoming visit to India by the lord chancellor. Crucially, there was the understanding that worldwide competition for legal services is set to intensify over the coming decade. In this context, Clarke’s comment on the plan to introduce a European contract law was forthright. It is an ‘Esperanto fallacy’, he said, ‘a utopian belief that a perceived problem of diversity of languages can be solved by creating an extra one’. However, this will be one to watch. There was one topic not touched on in the speech: immigration. International players must be able to plan confidently to use the UK as a base for their global operations. This, along with the visa regime, will be part of the ongoing dialogue between the sector, the business-focused ministries and the Home Office. Next, in October, we will have the ‘Unlocking Disputes’ campaign. This will be launched to complement the opening of the new courts complex at the Rolls Building. It is an industry-led initiative to promote the litigation, arbitration and mediation services available here. It will also be used to brief the Foreign Office and UKTI staff in Britain’s embassies and high commissions who are on the front line of the government’s new ‘commercial diplomacy’. Susan Haird, the deputy chief executive of UKTI, spoke on this aspect of her department’s work during the panel session at the event. Lastly, the Rolls Building itself will bring together the combined specialist judicial expertise of the High Court in relation to financial, business and property disputes. It will be home to the largest concentration of judicial expertise of that type anywhere in the world. We know nobody comes here for the weather or to do business in a particular building because of its shiny new furniture, but the new court is the physical embodiment of a commitment to promote the legal services sector, and the industry’s ambition to make London the venue of choice for resolving global commercial disputes. last_img read more

Read More »

E-conveyancing venture names new chief

first_imgThe Law Society-backed joint venture developing the Veyo electronic conveyancing system has appointed a new chief executive with a brief to review and evaluate the product.Simon Drane, executive director of business development for the Law Society, takes over today at Legal Practice Technologies. Ian Gray, chairman, said: ‘We are committed to ensuring that Veyo will meet conveyancers’ expectations. Because of this we will only fully launch the product when we are satisfied that it is working well and will add value to the conveyancing process.’Gray added that ‘the first job for any new CEO is to review and evaluate the product. This will identify what needs to be done to make Veyo available to conveyancers as soon as we are satisfied that it has the functions and usability to be a market leader.’A Law Society spokesperson said: ‘We are excited about the development of Veyo. We know from the conveyancing community that it is a good concept and will save conveyancers time and money.‘Simon will be reviewing and evaluating Veyo with a view to launching it when the product has right level of functionality and is easy to use. There is still a considerable demand for Veyo.’last_img read more

Read More »