Body Found in Macon County Identified

first_imgOfficers with the Macon County Sheriff’s Office and Franklin Police Department responded around 4pm Thursday afternoon to an area of Macon County where a body was discovered by two individuals camping at the old abandoned campground located on NP&L Loop Road. Sheriff Robert L. Holland requested the assistance of the State Bureau of Investigation who immediately responded to assist in the investigation. Investigators have determined the identity and contacted the deceased’s family. Preliminary results of autopsy show no signs of foul play as the cause of death. Toxicology results will take several weeks to months to be completed.last_img

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Green light for SA’s wind farm

first_img6 November 2006The City of Cape Town has signed a 20-year agreement to buy “clean” electricity from Darling Wind Farm, paving the way for an innovative partnership between local and foreign investors, the government and the community of Darling to get South Africa’s first commercial wind farm venture up and running.Despite such obstacles as SA’s cheap electricity environment, and the enormous capital costs of setting up a wind farm, the country’s R70-million pilot commercial wind energy project will start operating in Darling, a small town north-west of Cape Town, in 2007.Using four giant wind turbines to generate an estimated 13.2 gigawatt-hours per year of “clean” electricity, Darling Wind Farm will feed this into the national power grid. It will then be “wheeled” through the grid and on to suppliers who have chosen to pay a 25c per kilowatt-hour surcharge for a “green” power supply.The City of Cape Town agreed in August to be the first such buyer/supplier. With growing concern over the global warming caused by the burning of fossil fuels such as coal and oil, city officials expect to sell the electricity on to an initially small but willing market.‘Green cred’ for customersThe first customers are expected to be businesses, who will pay the surcharge for a certain amount of “green” electricity while paying the standard rate – around 40c a kilowatt-hour – for the balance of their supply.These companies will then be able to showcase their “green credentials” when they market their products in South Africa and, especially, abroad, where consumers are increasingly eager to mitigate the effects of global warming by helping to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases.The project is the result of a partnership between the national government, the Danish government, the Central Energy Fund and the Darling Independent Power Producing Company.Hermann Oelsner, chief executive of Darling Wind Power and vice-president of the World Wind Energy Association, signed the 20-year power purchase agreement with Cape Town Mayor Helen Zille and city manager Achmat Ebrahim in August.Speaking after the signing, Oelsner said the agreement was the culmination of a 10-year process to establish wind energy as a sustainable source of electricity in South Africa.Its signing, he said, would facilitate “a unique and innovative partnership between local and foreign private investors, the national government, municipal government and the community of Darling, which will be an equity shareholder in the project.”17-storey-high towersDarling Wind Power will now be able to secure the necessary investment to finance the purchase of the initial four wind turbines – 17-storey-high towers with massive blades powering 42-ton engine rooms at the top of the towers.Oelsner said another six wind turbines would be added later, followed by another 10 in the longer term – noting that global demand for the turbines was so high that additional turbines would only be available by 2008 at the earliest.The City of Cape Town aims to source about 10% of its energy from renewable sources – which could include solar and other forms of energy – by 2020. The national government has set a target of an additional 10 000 gigawatt-hours a year in renewable energy for the national power grid by 2013.Public Enterprises Minister Alec Erwin has also said that the government’s aim is for independent power producers to contribute around 30% of South Africa’s total electricity supply.Eskom’s demonstration wind farmThe country’s – and sub-Saharan Africa’s – first large wind turbine facility was state power company Eskom’s facility at Klipheuwel just north of Cape Town. The pilot phase of Eskom’s Klipheuwel research and demonstration project started in August 2002 and ran through to the end of 2005.Eskom has reportedly been less than enthusiastic about the prospects for wind power generation in South Africa. Reporting on the Klipheuwel project, Eskom described the country’s wind resource as “moderate when compared to northern European conditions”.According to Eskom, South African conditions would enable wind farms to operate at a maximum capacity of about 15% to 25%, compared to about 30% in northern Europe.Oelsner has disputed this, saying the Darling wind farm has a maximum capacity factor of 34%.And while some might criticise the project for relying on a form of government subsidy, Oelsner argues that the fossil fuel and nuclear energy industries are heavily subsidised worldwide.SouthAfrica.info reporter and BuaNews Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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TB toolkit for SA companies

first_img5 June 2008The Global Health Initiative of the World Economic Forum (WEF) and pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly have launched a new toolkit that aims to boost the involvement of South African companies in tackling tuberculosis (TB) in the country.The announcement, made at the World Economic Forum on Africa in Cape Town this week, comes as South Africa faces an emerging threat of TB/HIV co-infections and fatal drug-resistant strains of the disease.In a statement on Tuesday, the WEF said the toolkit was developed in collaboration with the Lilly MDR-TB partnership, together with inputs from national and international partners, including private sector representatives.The toolkit provides concrete guidelines to help South African companies rapidly increase their TB control programmes by adopting a joint approach to tackling both TB and HIV.With some 70% of TB patients in South Africa also infected with HIV, the importance of an integrated approach to care is clear, and the South African government has recognised the importance of engaging the private sector to achieve its TB case detection and treatment targets.South African companies have the opportunity to catalyse effective public-private partnerships to facilitate successful patient and programme management, lessening the economic impact of TB, which currently leads to a decline in worker productivity estimated at US$13-billion (R100.7-billion) annually.“Businesses have a fundamental responsibility towards both their employees and the wider community, and for preservation of their long-term interests by ensuring the national development of human capital to drive economic growth,” said Eli Lilly Corporate Affairs and Communications vice president Alex Azar. “Tuberculosis has the capacity to undermine all of this.”Shattering the cycleAccording to the WEF, the TB toolkit aims to shatter the cycle of transmission that so often defines the gravity of TB. By intercepting the progression of the disease and its lethal synergy with HIV/Aids, businesses can better leverage their existing health infrastructures and management tools and resources to greater effect.Combined with the technical expertise and knowledge available under South Africa’s national TB programme and the national Aids control programme, companies can provide a critical mass of resources for successful TB control.“It’s a disturbing paradox to think that people should die from a curable disease like tuberculosis,” said Dr Shaloo Puri, head of the India Business Alliance, and India and tuberculosis adviser at the Global Health Initiative of the World Economic Forum. “The sooner South African businesses start awakening to the extent of the problem, the sooner they can understand the associated risks in the workforce and to their business.”Community engagementOn a practical level, the toolkit will help companies increase opportunities and activities in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of TB/HIV co-infections in the workplace.These measures will in turn help alleviate the burden and costs associated with absenteeism, disrupted workflow and reduced productivity.By engaging proactively with the community, which forms a key component of the overall business environment, businesses can offset the marginal cost of partnering with local stakeholders with the huge benefits they will reap through greater efficiency in the workplace and the good will in the community.Although South Africa represents only 0.7% of the world’s population, it has 28% of the global number of HIV-positive TB cases.“South African business leaders must start to recognize the crucial role they can play in TB care and the importance of the workplace setting as a win-win setting for TB control,” the WEF says.“Despite being preventable, treatable and curable, TB continues to devastate the continent. Unless individuals and organizations unite in advocacy and action, everyone stands to lose.”SAinfo reporter Would you like to use this article in your publicationor on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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African art scene blooms in South Africa

first_imgArtist David Koloane attends the 2013 Turbine Art Fair in Johannesburg. (Image: Turbine Art Fair)• Ross Douglas Founder and directorArtlogic+27 11 447 3868• Jade MacCallumMarketing ManagerTurbine Art Fair+27 11 575 3698• Liza Dyason ProducerCape Town Art Fair+27 21 674 5644Lucille DavieThe African contemporary art scene is blooming in South Africa, with one fair going into its seventh year, and two others having a second showing this year.The longest-running of them, the FNB Joburg Art Fair, is planning its seventh splash in August this year in Sandton, in the northern suburbs of the city of gold. “As we sit down to plan for the seventh edition of the FNB Joburg Art Fair, we are very excited to [get] feedback on what a pivotal year 2013 was for the African contemporary art scene,” says Ross Douglas, the director and founder of Artlogic, the company that initially conceived the idea.In 2013, 33 galleries participated, with groups in Mozambique, Nigeria and Zimbabwe showcasing work, while galleries in England, France, Germany and Spain took floor space too. Douglas says sales were up 25%, with R20-million raked in. Some 10 000 visitors attended the fair, which was held in September.Artlogic was founded by Douglas in 2004, with its first venture a production of William Kentridge’s 9 Films for Projection, shown in South Africa and New York, as well as The Magic Flute. Artlogic also produces the FoodWineDesign Fair, and the Winter Sculpture Fair, held in the scenic surrounds of the Nirox Foundation sculpture park, in the Cradle of Humankind, some 40km north-west of Johannesburg.Douglas says that the Joburg Art Fair is now on the international art calendar, and the 2013 edition secured interviews on German National Radio, Deutsche Welle, Monocle, Art Tactic and the AMA newsletter. There were also six African pavilions at the Venice Biennale 2013, he adds, and the Golden Lion for the best national pavilion was awarded to Angola.Two new art fairs“While we [had] been pioneers for five years, 2013 saw no fewer than two new art fairs in South Africa.” The first Cape Town Art Fair took place in October, with the second planned for late February this year. And the first Turbine Art Fair, in Newtown in downtown Joburg, took place in July; the second is planned for July this year.In total, 28 South African galleries were represented in Newtown, with the aim to create a platform for aspiring art collectors to buy art, says Jade MacCallum, the marketing manager of the Forum Company, which conceived and organised the event. A ceiling of R25 000 was set for the artworks.“The project was started by The Forum with the purpose to educate, include and excite people about the wonderful world of art, people [who] wouldn’t ordinarily be exposed to art or galleries. Sharing art experiences enables us to live out our passion and create opportunities,” says MacCallum. Some 3 000 people attended the two-day event, and she says the organisers are satisfied that they achieved their aim.The second Cape Town Art Fair takes place at the start of the year in which Cape Town is World Design Capital (WDC). “WDC is a biannual honour, awarded by the International Council for Societies of Industrial Design, to cities across the globe to show their commitment using design as a social, cultural and economic development tool,” indicate the organisers of the fair, Fiero Milano Africa.In all, 40 galleries took stands at the first Cape Town fair, most of which were from the city. Asked why it took Cape Town so long to have an art fair, Liza Dyason, the event producer, said: “I’m uncertain why it took so long… the idea seems obvious. Until now it was felt that the market was primarily Joburg-based but with the enormous developments and investments going into art and design in the Mother City, the [Cape Town Art Fair] was seen as an important addition to the events that are planned, especially with Cape Town World Design Capital 2014 in mind.”Fiera Milano Africa director Louise Cashmore says: “The success of the first fair in 2013 clearly illustrated that the time was right for Cape Town to host an art fair of this nature. Cape Town is an international city and home to many of the country’s leading contemporary artists, curators and galleries.”Other spin-offsAnother spin-off was the 1.54 Contemporary African Art Fair, held in London in October 2013. Artists from Tanzania, Mali, Angola and Benin exhibited, and galleries from Equatorial New Guinea, Ivory Coast, Mali, and South Africa took stands. Alongside these galleries were several European dealers who have an interest in work from Africa: Milan’s Galleria Continua, London’s Jack Bell and Berlin’s Mikael Andersen, among others.In November, the announcement of the first major private art museum in Africa was made: the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa will open in late 2016 in Cape Town. Jochen Zeitz has committed his collection of contemporary art from Africa and its diaspora in perpetuity as the museum’s founding collection. Not only will he underwrite the running costs of the museum, but he will provide “a substantial acquisition budget to allow the museum to acquire new important artworks over time to remain on the edge of contemporary cultural production”, according to a statement by the V&A Waterfront, his partner in the venture.The museum will focus on collecting, preserving, researching, and exhibiting “cutting edge contemporary art”. It will be housed in the historic Grain Silo at the V&A Waterfront, with the V&A committing over R500-million to the development. “Built in 1921, and at 57m tall, the Grain Silo remains an icon of the Cape Town skyline. This investment will further the development of art in Africa and acknowledges the important cultural and financial contribution the visual arts sector makes.”Around the time of the announcement, Zeitz said: “Over the last two decades, Africa has played an important role in both my professional and private life. My collection has been strategically built over many years specifically with the goal to create an internationally relevant public contemporary art museum in Africa. After considering many cities across Africa, I am excited to partner with the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town. It is an iconic location in an iconic city, and will be situated in a historic landmark building. This will make my collection accessible to local, national, continental and international audiences.”Douglas says that this year, more galleries from Africa and Europe will participate in the Joburg Art Fair, but the core theme will remain African. England, France, Germany, Mozambique, Nigeria, Spain and Zimbabwe will be represented, and so far 33 galleries have confirmed their attendance, 11 of which are new to the event.“One of Artlogic’s primary aims with the FNB Joburg Art Fair is to grow the audience for art from Africa,” he says.last_img read more

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Ambassadors, Cubicles, and Embassies!

first_imgAmbassadors are responsible for embassies. You’re an ambassador. Your cubicle is your embassy.Some ambassadors are HORRIBLE. Some are good.What does it take to be a good Ambassador? To be a good ambassador, a person needs certain skills. Things like:     A positive attitude;     a good work ethic;     team-orientation;     genuine diplomacy; and     a solid understanding of foreign and domestic policy!These are self-explanatory, but the stuff about policy warrants some explaining.Understanding foreign policy in “cubicle” terms means understanding what others in your organization are doing and how it pertains to you.Understanding domestic policy in “cubicle” terms means having a thorough grasp on your position within the company and how you impact the rest of the organization.The ambassador’s job includes relaying the policies of her own country, while keeping the leaders of her nation informed of the climate, and events in the host country.In cubicle terms, that means being able to communicate your role’s significance, while staying abreast of the “climate and events” of coworkers, your boss, the board, customers, clientele, competitors, the market at large, the business, and the industry.Ambassadors work to create good will in host countries by attending events and facilitating cultural exchanges between countries. In cubicle terms, that means attending company events and facilitating “cultural exchanges” between yourself and relevant stakeholders of your organization. Help others understand you and seek to understand them.Finally, ambassadors help to keep citizens safe while they are abroad. In cubicle-speak that basically means…umm…well…that you should be careful with push-pins, scissors, loose binders, open drawers and cabinet doors, and by all means put the pointy ends of pens and pencils to the bottom of the pencil-holder.last_img read more

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