McCarthy breaks ground on new Banner Boswell ER, patient tower

first_imgMcCarthy Building Companies recently broke ground on a new ER and patient tower project at Banner Boswell Medical Center in Sun City, Ariz., with the demolition of a 33-year-old, two-story parking structure that paves the way for the start of new construction. The new $106 million emergency room (ER), main lobby and patient tower at Banner Boswell Medical Center, located at 10401 W. Thunderbird Blvd. in Sun City, Ariz., includes a 40,000-square-foot emergency room and a new six-story tower that will serve as the hospital’s new main entrance and provide room for future growth.The new ER, which is projected to complete construction in summer 2020, will provide much needed additional capacity. Banner Boswell’s existing ER often runs at or near capacity. The new ER will increase the number of beds by a third — from 42 to 56 — allowing the department to care for up to 60,000 ER patients annually. The current ER was built to handle up to 45,000 patients annually.“Banner Boswell Medical Center opened nearly 50 years ago to serve the small, but growing community of Sun City,” said Banner Boswell Chief Operating Officer Brian Standage. “Since then, our hospital has evolved into a leading provider of medical care in the Northwest Valley, including a nationally-recognized heart program. Our new ER and patient tower positions us to serve the community for the next 50 years and beyond,” he said, “as we strive to make healthcare easier and life better for our patients.”The new tower will represent an additional $46 million investment into the community by nonprofit Banner Health. Combined with the new emergency room, which the community is helping support through donations to the Sun Health Foundation, Banner Boswell is set to receive an investment totaling more than $106 million.“What an exciting time this is for the community as a new milestone in health care is occurring, thanks in part to community support for the ER through Sun Health Foundation’s Generosity  for Generations Campaign,” said Joe La Rue, Sun Health President/CEO. “We are proud of the philanthropic partnership we have with Banner Boswell – philanthropic partners to continue a legacy of health care.”The tower’s first floor, to open in late 2020, will contain the main lobby, gift shop, retail pharmacy, admitting desk and chapel. The five floors above the main lobby will remain “shelled” space, reserved for future inpatient rooms. “Shell space” is space constructed to meet future needs; it is space enclosed by an exterior building shell, but otherwise unfinished inside.The project is being managed using Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) with the owner, design team, general contractor and trade partners all co-located on the project site and committed to the success of the project through robust collaboration and innovation.“Co-locating the entire project team by bringing all stakeholders together in one facility has proven to be an immeasurable asset that promotes collaborative team work, a solutions-oriented culture, and a high level of accountability from all project stakeholders,” said Chris Jacobson, vice president of McCarthy Building Companies. “Hospital construction projects inherently possess a lot of moving parts, and traditional project delivery methods often result in a fair amount of redesign. By employing IPD and co-location strategies, the team is able to move forward unimpeded.”Some of the innovative cost savings measures on the Banner Boswell project include prefabrication of the following components:• Exterior skin, including glass, metal panel, EIFS (Exterior Insulated Finish System) and masonry block• Interior partition walls• ER exam room headwalls including all MEP (Mechanical / Electrical / Plumbing) componentsThe prefabrication will be completed offsite in a shop for the interior scope and onsite in a controlled environment for the exterior skin. As part of the IPD process, all the major building trade partners were contracted early in design to aid in target value design, constructability and Building Information Modeling (BIM) coordination prior to permit. This has proven to save on costs and ensures that the construction team is able to proceed with system fabrication soon after the building begins coming out of the ground. The architect on the project is HMC Architects. Major trade partners include Buehler & Buehler, Southland, Foothills Fire Protection, Schuff Steel, Cannon & Wendt, University Mechanical, Norris Design and The Berg Group.last_img read more

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Innovation: Who Else Is Doing It?

first_imgBloomberg:Everyone applauds innovation. At least, they love it in retrospect, after it has worked. Before that, it’s just somebody’s wild idea that competes with every other wild idea for resources and support. What sounds great in the abstract seems risky when translated to a specific unproven idea. For that reason, executives who tell me that they want more innovation sometimes ask, as their first question, “Who else is doing it?” Or they say, “We want more innovation; we just don’t want to be the first.”I hate to point out the irony to them. Guys, innovation means maybe no one else is doing it. You might have to be the first. And that might be a good thing.Read the whole story:  Bloomberg More of our Members in the Media >last_img

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Culturing the connectome: Scientists map the brain’s network of interconnections

first_imgShare Share on Twitter LinkedIn Mapping the human brain’s network of interconnections, known as the connectome is typically done with help from computational tools because recreating interconnections between different brain regions has been challenging in the lab. Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have developed a method to recreate connections between neurons from two different brain areas in a dish. Their findings were published in Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience.Researchers from OIST’s Brain Mechanism for Behaviour Unit, Neurobiology Research Unit, and Physics and Biology Unit collaborated on this study. The study used neurons from embryos of mice. The first connections between different brain compartments develop at the embryonic stage.The OIST researchers cultured neurons from the cortex, located at the front of the brain and a structure under it known as the striatum in separate compartments. The OIST researchers had previously shown that culturing cortical and striatal cells within the same compartment resulted in an artificial connectomic system as these cortical and striatal neurons grew connections in all directions in a disorganized manner. Pinterestcenter_img Inside a living brain, neurons within the cortex and striatum form dense interconnections with neurons within their respective brain compartments. There is only one-way electrophysiological traffic, from cortical cells to striatal cells via the formers’ axons. This one way street had been difficult to recreate in culture because striatal cells tend to die out when they do not receive electrophysiological impulses from cortical cells.The OIST researchers paired cortical and striatal compartments on the surface of multiple multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) and kept the cultures alive for three weeks.MEAs are tiny rectangular devices that consist of evenly spaced metal bumps arranged in a grid, all of which serve as electrodes. Each metal bump can transmit the measure of the electrical activity over it. Because many neurons talk to each other simultaneously, mathematical techniques are used to sort the signals from all active electrodes on a MEA, in order to determine which groups are sending and receiving feedback from other groups.After three weeks, enough axons had grown between the cortical and striatal compartments. The MEAs were then hooked up to a system to measure the bursts of electrical activity occurring at the different electrodes. While this system was recording, a knife cut was performed between the cortical and striatal compartments, severing the axons that had grown between them.When this was done, electrical activity was snuffed out almost completely around the electrodes within the striatal compartment. The pattern of electrical activity between electrodes inside the cortical compartment was relatively unaffected, suggesting the interconnectivity between the cortical neurons was unchanged. This demonstrated that there were negligible upstream connections forming between striatal and cortical cells, and a working corticostriatal network had been recreated.“We can also introduce a third compartment into this setup, possibly more. This would allow connections to grow between multiple types of neurons found in distant parts of the brain,” said Dr. Marianela Garcia Munoz, Group Leader of the Brain Mechanism for Behaviour Unit. Email Share on Facebooklast_img read more

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Wildwood Assault Lands One in Hospital

first_imgState Troopers were notified just after 6pm that a male inmate was being taken to Central Peninsula Hospital. Soldotna Bureau of Investigation was notified and took over case responsibility. Beth Ipsen with AST said they are regarding another inmate as a suspect, but haven’t yet finished their investigation. The inmate is yet to be identified.center_img FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享A Monday evening assault at Wildwood landed one inmate in hospital with non-life threatening injuries.last_img

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Spurrier: Lattimore Would be Welcome Back at USC

first_imgColumbia, SC (WLTX) – South Carolina Head Coach Steve Spurrier said that former Gamecock Marcus Lattimore is still considering options for his playing future.Spurrier was asked about his former star player during a teleconference with reporters Wednesday.Lattimore, who’s currently a member of the San Francisco 49ers, has been attempting to make a football comeback following severe injuries to both his knees while playing at Carolina,. Though he was drafted in 2013, he’s yet to play a down in the NFL. Last week, however, he was cleared to play, but Lattimore reportedly suffered pain in his knees during his first practices with the team.Monday, ESPN reported that Lattimore was planning to retire. His agent denied the report, saying Lattimore had made no decision on his career.Spurrier echoed that, saying that when the two spoke recently, Lattimore still hadn’t made up his mind what he wants to do. “He has put everything into it, rehabbing for two years,” Spurrier said. “It’s disappointing, but he is in good health…I think his knee just has not come around quite as well as he hoped. He can run around, but not to play running back.”Spurrier said that if Lattimore did decide to end his playing career, he’d have career options back at USC, saying Athletics Director Ray Tanner and University President Harris Pastides would welcome him back.last_img read more

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