On the Move 10-1-09

first_imgOn the Move 10-1-09 On the Move Francis Pierce, Susan Sewell and Richard Allen recently joined Mateer Harbert in Orlando. Along with current Mateer Harbert partner Larry Townsend, they will focus on the firm’s growing medical malpractice and insurance practice areas. Pierce joins the firm as a partner and will lead the expanded medical malpractice and insurance practice areas. Sewell joins as a senior associate. Allen rejoins join the firm as a partner. Marci A. Rubin has joined Phillips, Cantor, Berlowitz & Shalek in Hollywood as a partner focusing her practice on corporate law, commercial and residential real estate, transactional law, mergers and acquisitions. Kate Bedell has joined the Fourth Circuit Public Defender’s Office as chief of the Felony Unit Division. Jeffrey P. Buak has been named equity shareholder at Unger, Acree, Gilbert, Tressler, Tacktill, & Buak in Orlando and will continue his primary practice of real estate and land use. Alicia E. Adams has joined McConnaughhay, Duffy, Coonrod, Pope & Weaver in Tallahassee. She will focus her practice in the area of civil litigation defense. Chad M. Pilon has joined Christopher N. Ligori and Associates in Tampa. Pilon focuses his practice in the areas of personal injury, automobile negligence, wrongful death, and premises liability. Eliot C. Abbott has joined Ruden McClosky in Miami as a partner. George Sprinkel IV has joined Upchurch Watson White & Max Mediation Group. Marta Colomar Garcia has joined Diaz Reus Targ & Lee in Miami as an associate where she will handle complex international corporate transactions and contracts, international breach-of-contract claims, and real estate matters. Rouselle “Bo” Sutton III has joined Railey & Harding in Orlando as an associate in the construction litigation practice group. Kelly Kolb has joined Ruden McClosky in Ft. Lauderdale as a partner. Kolb focuses his practice on labor & employment, insurance, and bad faith matters. Aaron Behar has joined Weiss Serota Helfman Pastoriza Cole & Boniske in Ft. Lauderdale as a partner. He will also serve as chair of the firm’s general liability group. Behar primarily represents insurance carriers and their insureds in the areas of employment practices liability, errors and omissions, and bodily injury. James E. Malphurs has joined Allen, Dyer, Doppelt, Milbrath & Gilchrist in Orlando where he will practice intellectual property law. Robert Thornburg, of counsel to the firm, is now working in the Miami office, located at 777 Brickell Avenue, Suite 1114. Sonja Knighton Dickens has been appointed as the in-house city attorney for the City of Miami Gardens. Zoltan Pinter has joined Leighton Law in Miami. Pinter’s practice focuses on catastrophic injury, violent crime/inadequate security, medical malpractice, product liability, business tort litigation, agricultural business and litigation, fraud investigation, and litigation. Kelly Naik has been promoted to chief of the Fourth Circuit Public Defender Office’s County Court Division. Mark R. Osherow has joined Adorno & Yoss in the Ft. Lauderdale and Boca Raton offices as a partner. Osherow’s experience includes a wide range of business litigation matters from inception through trial involving employment, real estate, construction, fraud and misrepresentation, as well as corporate and partnership disputes, and related contractual issues. Russell A. Yagel has become a managing partner, Jessica Rothenberg and Robert Stober have become equity partners, and Ron Saunders has become of counsel with Hershoff, Lupino & Yagel in Tavernier. John M. Quaranta has joined Damian & Valori in Miami and will concentrate his practice in the areas of complex commercial Litigation. Laura J. Varela has joined Phillips, Cantor, Berlowitz & Shalek in Hollywood as a partner in the commercial litigation group, practicing in the areas of commercial, real estate, community association, lending and banking, and distressed property litigation. Brian J. Redar has joined the Department of Homeland Security as a general attorney in the Office of Associate Chief Counsel for Customs and Border Protection, Long Beach, CA. Devand (Dave) A. Sukhdeo has joined Jackson Lewis in Miami as a partner and TerRance Q. Woodard has joined the firm as an associate. Sukhdeo and Woodard practice employment law. Dean J. Merten has moved The Merten Law Office, P.A., to 6905 South Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach 33405. Merten can be reached at (561) 585-0464 or [email protected] Merten continues to practice criminal defense. Debra L. Munchel has joined the 10th Circuit Public Defender’s Office in Bartow. Leslie A. Wickes has been elected the managing partner of Volpe, Bajalia, Wickes, Rogerson & Wachs in Jacksonville. Webb Peduzzi, P.A., has relocated its Orlando office to 1800 Pembrook Dr., Ste. 300, Orlando 32810. The firm may be reached by phone locally at (407) 956-1030, toll free at (877) 653-8003, or by e-mail at [email protected] David E. Ramba has opened Ramba Consulting Group and Ramba Law Group at 101 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee 32301; phone (850) 727-7087; fax: (850) 807-2502; e-mail: [email protected] A substantial portion of Ramba’s practice is devoted toward legislative representation and matters before state agencies. Erica Bloomberg-Johnson has joined the Law Firm of Gloria W. Fletcher in Gainesville and will be handling criminal cases. She may be reached at (352) 374-4007 or by fax (352) 337-8340. Gary Khutorsky has joined the Ft. Lauderdale office of Litchfield Cavo as a partner. Khutorsky practices in the area of insurance coverage. Angela Swenka has also joined the Ft. Lauderdale office as an associate. Ian Weldon recently became a “death qualified” attorney and moves to the Capital Crimes Division in Homicide at the Fourth Circuit Public Defender’s Office, while Regina Wright ascends to the Division for Major Crimes. Robert J. Sniffen and Michael P. Spellman have formed Sniffen & Spellman in Tallahassee. The firm will offer advice and representation to businesses and governmental agencies statewide in the areas of labor and employment law, law enforcement liability, civil rights litigation, fair housing litigation, insurance defense, administrative law, commercial transactions and commercial litigation, school law, special education litigation, and property taxation. October 1, 2009 On the Movelast_img read more

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Small islands, champions of sustainability

first_imgIn Zlarin, from this Friday 01.07.2016. in the Vesna Parun Homeland Museum, starting at 20:30 pm, an international traveling exhibition of photographs of small sustainable islands around the world is being held.Since 2014, the Small Sustainable Islands initiative, with the support of the Conservatoire du Littoral, has been developed with the aim of encouraging dialogue between participants working on a daily basis to protect the islands and valorise their actions: local associations, authorities, protected area managers, businesses… In this context, the annual CELEBRATE ISLANDS celebration offers an opportunity to express the uniqueness for which they unite people in their environment. This is the first major step towards creating an international solidarity community of small islands oriented towards sustainable development.Ultimately, the Small Sustainable Islands Initiative will help create a broad network of exchange of experiences and good practices, encourage and reward local efforts by its members, including through the Small Sustainable Island label.The small islands are fragile and unique. They are at the forefront of global change, these are the first areas and places of innovation, which are constantly renewed due to their own sustainable development. Recycling waste, conserving water resources, promoting renewable energy, protecting biodiversity, valorizing cultural heritage… more than just a call to travel, this exhibition highlights the concrete actions of more than 30 small islands around the world for the challenges of tomorrow. The traveling exhibition, organized by the Conservatoire du littoral and their partners as part of the third edition of CELEBRATE ISLANDS, has already been presented in France, Spain, Tunisia and Mozambique, and now in Croatia.By organizing this photo exhibition, cooperation was established Zlarin Tourist Board and Kud Koralj and MIC-Vis (international multidisciplinary scientific conference organized jointly by VERN ‘Polytechnic and Ivo Pilar Institute of Social Sciences under the auspices of the City of Vis) with Conservatoire du littoral and laid the foundations for future cooperation which can emphasize the importance of natural and cultural sights , and the need for sustainable management of island areas in order to preserve their heritage.The Conservatory of Littoral Founded 41 years ago, the Conservatoire du littoral (Coastal Protection Agency) is a public institution for the protection of the coastal area through the purchase of land in mainland France and French overseas estates and through technical and institutional cooperation abroad. For more than 10 years, she has led projects specifically dedicated to small islands, monitored and supported local associations, protected areas and governments in their small island planning and management policies and operations. The Conservatoire du littoral provides international support to civil society organizations in the protection of the island’s heritage.last_img read more

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NAS report urges school districts to prioritize reopening

first_imgWeighing the public health risks posed by the coronavirus against the educational risks of not having in-person instruction, and the impact that closed schools could have on existing racial and social inequities, a new report from the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS) is urging school districts to prioritize reopening, with an emphasis on providing full-time, in-person instruction of children in grades K-5 and special needs students.But the report, published yesterday, acknowledges that reopening schools in the midst of COVID-19 will be a difficult task requiring resources and input from a variety of stakeholders. Schools will have to implement costly mitigation strategies to limit transmission of the virus, staffing will be a challenge, closures could occur based on the progress of the pandemic, and federal and state governments will need to provide significant financial help to districts and schools to enable them to reopen.The report also notes that reopening schools cannot be 100% safe as long as the pandemic persists.”Whether to reopen school buildings for the 2020–2021 school year is one of the most consequential and complex decisions many education leaders will ever have to make,” the report said. “While the benefits of reopening for students, families, and communities are clear, leaders must also take into account the health risks to school personnel and students’ families, as well as the practicality and cost of the mitigation strategies that will be needed to operate safely.”Districts face difficult decisionsThe report comes as the school year approaches and school districts around the nation grapple with the decision on whether to fully reopen, return to the distance-learning mode that they adopted in the spring, or create a hybrid model.Some school districts in states where the pandemic is raging, including the Los Angeles Unified school district, have already announced that they will not reopen and will continue with online learning. Schools in New York City, which has seen a significant reduction in coronavirus cases since peaking in April, will partially reopen, with children receiving in-person instruction from 1 to 3 days a week.”We all know the best place for students to learn is in a school setting,” LA Unified Superintendent Austin Beutner told the Los Angeles Times. “And as much as we want to be back at schools and have students back at schools—we can’t do it until it’s safe and appropriate.”Michael Osterholm, PhD, director of the University of Minnesota’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (publisher of CIDRAP News), said in today’s episode of the Osterholm Update podcast that the question of reopening schools is one of the most difficult he’s dealt with during the pandemic.”How we deal with the school issue is probably going to be one of the defining moments of how we learn to live with COVID-19,” Osterholm said. “I don’t think there is a single answer; I think there are going to be multiple answers to this, and it’s going to be up to our creativity to deal with this.”The NAS report acknowledges that, given the current state of the pandemic, many districts are likely to use a blend of in-person and distance learning. And while the evidence to date suggests that children and youth are at low risk of serious illness or death from COVID-19, many significant safety issues will make reopening school buildings a challenge.For one, there is insufficient evidence to determine how contagious children are, or how likely they are to contract the virus. In addition, black, LatinX, and indigenous children, along with low-income children and those with underlying conditions, have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19. And many teachers and staff members are at greater risk of serious consequences from infection.But the authors of the report—a committee made up of experts in education, medicine, and epidemiology—concluded that because of the potential risks for students of keeping schools closed, districts should prioritize reopening with an emphasis on in-person learning. Distance learning cannot take the place of in-person interaction, they said, especially for younger children and special needs students who would be best served by in-person instruction, and disparities in access to reliable internet and electronic devices could compound already existing inequities.”The risks of not having face-to-face learning are especially high for young children, who may suffer long-term consequences academically if they fall behind in the early grades,” the committee wrote.In addition, they cited the benefits that schools provide for families beyond education, including reliable childcare, meals, and mental health services.”Reopening school buildings will allow schools to provide these supports and services more easily and in a more complete way,” they wrote.Mitigation strategiesThe report provides several mitigation strategies to help school districts reopen schools and protect students and teachers, many of which are recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It calls for school districts to provide surgical masks to all teachers and staff and hand sanitizer for everyone who enters a school building, encourage mask wearing and hand hygiene among students and staff, reorganize classrooms to promote physical distancing, limit large gatherings, prioritize cleaning, ventilation, and air filtration, and create a culture of health and safety.Implementing all these measures will not come cheap. Using a recent estimate reported by EdWeek, the committee suggests that a school district with 3,269 students, 8 buildings, and 329 staff members could spend as much as $1,780,000 for the 2020-21 school year. That’s why the committee urges state and federal governments to provide school districts with significant resources.”Many districts will be unable to afford implementing the entire suite of mitigation measures, potentially leaving students and staff in those districts at greater risk of infection,” the committee wrote. “In the absence of substantial financial support from the federal government and state governments, it is likely that the communities most impacted by COVID-19 will see even worse health outcomes in the wake of reopening schools.”The report also calls for state public health departments to assess school facilities to ensure they meet minimum health and safety standards and consult with schools on their mitigation plans, and for states to provide schools with access to public health expertise if they are in areas where public health departments are short-staffed. State, local, and education leaders are encouraged to create decision-making task forces that can gather input from various stakeholders. And school districts should take into account existing disparities within and across schools.”There are no easy answers, no quick and affordable policy decisions that will enable children to reenter schools safely while simultaneously addressing the profound systemic inequities this moment in time has laid bare,” the committee wrote. “Addressing these challenges will require the coordinated and concerted efforts of all sectors in the United States. It will require commitments to equitable school financing, to engaging communities in the complicated and emotional decision-making related to reopening schools, and to centering equity in the discussions that surround those decisions.”In its final recommendation, the committee called for more research into children and transmission of COVID-19, the role of airborne transmission, how schools could contribute to community spread, and the effectiveness of mitigation strategies.last_img read more

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