Redknapp Disloyal Arnautovics China move driven by greed

first_imgFormer West Ham manager Harry Redknapp slammed Marko Arnautovic’s decision to leave the club in favour of a lucrative move to ChinaThe Austrian forward’s agent and brother, Danijel Arnautovic, released a statement announcing his wish to seal a £35m move to China on Thursday.This came shortly after Hammers boss Manuel Pellegrini claimed that the reports of interest from an unnamed Chinese club in Arnautovic were just “rumours”.West Ham have since released a statement of their own that announces they will not be selling Arnautovic in this month’s transfer window.Now Redknapp, who coached the likes of Frank Lampard and Rio Ferdinand at West Ham between 1994 to 2001, has hit out against Arnautovic.“They come and they go,” Redknapp told talkSPORT. “A mate of mine had a horse and named it ‘We’ve Got Payet’.“And I told him in six months he’ll have to rename that horse ‘We Had Payet’. That’s how it works.Jose Mourinho is sold on Lampard succeeding ar Chelsea Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho wanted to give his two cents on Frank Lampard’s odds as the new Chelsea FC manager, he thinks he will succeed.There really…“Forget loyalty. The days of people staying at clubs forever is long gone.“I don’t know the boy, but he never looks that happy. He’s a real good player, he’s got great talent, but it’s a shame for West Ham fans. It’s sad really but that’s the way it’s gone.“It’s not like it was when it was all lads who came from within an area, played for West Ham, that was their club and they were all happy to be there.“Now, there are probably four or five of them who would love the chance to jump ship and move to China or anywhere else they can make a few quid.“In their mind and the agent’s mind, they’re just thinking of the next move where they can make a few quid.”West Ham will host Arsenal at the London Stadium this Saturday in a Premier League match.last_img read more

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Uber launches JUMP Scooters in San Diego

first_imgUber launches JUMP Scooters in San Diego December 19, 2018 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Ride-booking service Uber will launch dockless JUMP e-scooters in San Diego Wednesday, the fourth city in the U.S. the company will be serving.Uber acquired JUMP, a bikeshare company, in May to expand its public transit offerings. Uber expanded JUMP’s e-bike service to San Diego last month, dispersing 300 bikes around the city from Pacific Beach to downtown. San Diego is the fourth city to receive the scooters, joining Los Angeles, Santa Monica and Austin, Texas.The scooters work similarly to JUMP bikes in that riders use the main Uber app to unlock one and start a ride. They look strikingly similar to Lime scooters but with a red and black color scheme.Uber is offering free rides and free helmets through Jan. 9, 2019, to celebrate the rollout. Residents can receive up to five 30-minute rides per day, with scooters costing $1 to unlock and $0.10 per minute after the free rides have been exhausted. Residents can learn more about Uber’s JUMP services at jump.com. KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Updated: 9:18 PM Posted: December 19, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings Categories: Local San Diego News, Traffic & Accidents FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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New species of Pleistocene stork found on hobbit island

first_img Explore further More information: A new species of giant marabou stork (Aves: Ciconiiformes) from the Pleistocene of Liang Bua, Flores (Indonesia), Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2010, 160, 707–724. DOI:10.1111/j.1096-3642.2010.00616.x The fragments of fossilized bones were found by Dr. Hanneke Meijer of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC and her colleague Rokus Due of the National Center for Archaeology in Jakarta, Indonesia. Dr. Meijer is a paleontologist specializing in fossils of birds found on islands. The giant stork fossils were located in sediments dated at 20-50,000 years old in the Liang Bua cave in which H.floresiensis was found in 2004.Dr. Meijer said bird fossils are distributed throughout the sediments found in the cave and and provide a unique opportunity to study how birds evolved in an insular environment, including their increasing size and loss of flight. Fossils of other giant species have also been found, including giant rats and lizards, but the island was also home to pygmy elephants as well as the hobbits. Citation: New species of Pleistocene stork found on ‘hobbit’ island (2010, December 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-12-species-pleistocene-stork-hobbit-island.html In this undated sketch by Inge van Noortwijk and released by John Wiley & Sons, a six-foot (180 centimeters)-tall giant stork stands next to a dwarf Homo floresiensis that had lived on the remote island of Flores in Indonesia. According to the December 2010 issue of the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, fossils of the giant stork, which lived 20,000 to 50,000 years ago, have been discovered on the far-flung Indonesian island that has been home to many extreme-sized creatures, from tiny human-like “hobbits” and dwarf elephants to the world’s largest-known rats and lizards. Picture: John Wiley & Sons, Inge van Noortwijk Hippo’s island life helps explain dwarf hobbit (w/Video) (PhysOrg.com) — Fossils of a giant Pleistocene stork found on Flores island, Indonesia, belong to a new species according to scientists. The now extinct bird was probably flightless, and lived on the same island as Homo floresiensis, a small hominin species that has come to be nicknamed the “hobbit”. The extinct marabou stork, Leptoptilos robustus, was around 1.8 meters long and weighed about 16 kg, which makes it larger than modern stork species. It was probably capable of preying on juvenile hobbits, since the adult hobbits were only about one meter tall, but there is no evidence that it did. Modern marabou storks feed mostly on carrion meat but they also eat small mammals, birds, fish and frogs.Dr. Meijer said it is not unusual to find large birds on islands, especially if prey species are plentiful and mammalian predator species are scarce, but she said she had not expected to find a giant marabou stork on Flores. The size and weight of the bones suggest the stork was probably too heavy to fly, but it probably evolved from ancestors that flew to the isolated island and colonized it.Dr. Meijer said the island has always been isolated from other islands in the region and has never been connected to the mainland. She said the isolation had played an important role in shaping the evolution of the fauna on the island.It is not known why the giant and dwarf species on the island became extinct, but Dr. Meijer said all the fossils of the giant stork, the pygmy elephants and hobbits were found in sediments beneath a layer of volcanic ash, which suggests a volcanic eruption may have caused a major extinction in the region. The findings, published in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, help explain how wildlife in the Pleistocene adapted to island life. Marabou Stork (Leptoptilos crumeniferus) in the Oregon Zoo. Image: Wikipedia. © 2010 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Bacteria samples collected in Antarctica a century ago nearly identical to present

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Captain Scott’s century-old collections suggests marine life is capturing more carbon Explore further Captain Robert Falcon Scott was an officer with the British Royal Navy with an inclination for exploration. He led two expeditions in the Antarctic: The first was called the Discovery Expedition, the second was the Terra Nova Expedition. Falcon died during his return from the second expedition, but his efforts led to the discovery that Antarctica was once covered by forest—they also provided plant specimens for study by scientists back in England. One specimen was the cynobacterial mat—the main kind of vegetation covering the area where Falcon had based his camp. Once studied, the mats were pressed between sheets of paper and stored at the Natural History Museum. In this new effort, the researchers conducted a DNA analysis of the bacteria in the mats. Then they arranged to have researchers currently carrying out science experiments in nearly the same area in Antarctica collect new samples for study. After conducting a DNA analysis on the new samples, the results were compared with those from over a century ago. The researchers report that they found very little difference between the two.The sameness of the bacteria samples came as a surprise to the researchers, because they believed that it was likely that bacteria in Antarctica evolved as temperatures rose, or new species would have invaded. That neither has happened has caused the researchers to suggest that some organisms in Antarctica might be more resilient than expected. They also note that these findings do not contradict the belief that change is likely coming soon as temperatures continue to rise. It is possible, they also note, that the type of bacteria that live in Antarctica are unable to change and that is why they have not evolved. That would mean they will likely die once temperatures reach a certain point. © 2017 Phys.orgcenter_img More information: Using Captain Scott’s Discovery specimens to unlock the past: has Antarctic cyanobacterial diversity changed over the last 100 years? Proceedings of the Royal Society B (2017). rspb.royalsocietypublishing.or … .1098/rspb.2017.0833AbstractEvidence of climate-driven environmental change is increasing in Antarctica, and with it comes concern that this will propagate to impacts on biological communities. Recognition and prediction of change needs to incorporate the extent and timescales over which communities vary under extant conditions. However, few observations of Antarctic microbial communities, which dominate inland habitats, allow this. We therefore carried out the first molecular comparison of Cyanobacteria in historic herbarium microbial mats from freshwater ecosystems on Ross Island and the McMurdo Ice Shelf, collected by Captain R.F. Scott’s ‘Discovery’ Expedition (1902–1903), with modern samples from those areas. Using 16S rRNA gene surveys, we found that modern and historic cyanobacteria assemblages showed some variation in community structure but were dominated by the same genotypes. Modern communities had a higher richness, including genotypes not found in historic samples, but they had the highest similarity to other cyanobacteria sequences from Antarctica. The results imply slow cyanobacterial 16S rRNA gene genotype turnover and considerable community stability within Antarctic microbial mats. We suggest that this relates to Antarctic freshwater ‘organisms requiring a capacity to withstand diverse stresses, and that this could also provide a degree of resistance and resilience to future climatic-driven environmental change in Antarctica. A satellite image of Antarctica. Credit: USGS, via Wikipedia, Public Domain Citation: Bacteria samples collected in Antarctica a century ago nearly identical to present day samples (2017, June 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-06-bacteria-samples-antarctica-century-identical.html (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with the Natural History Museum of London and the University of Waikato have found that bacteria living in a part of Antarctica have not changed much over the past century. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Anne Jungblut and Ian Hawes describe how they compared the DNA of cynobacterial mats collected during Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s Discovery Expedition from 1901 to 1904 with modern specimens and what they found.last_img read more

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Flyersrightscom calls for more airport security

first_img Share Flyersrights.com calls for more airport security Posted by WASHINGTON — Air transportation has become the number one soft target for massacres and violence, as seen from the 9/11 attacks, Lockerbie, and the airport massacres in Brussels, Istanbul and now Fort Lauderdale.TSA and the U.S. Congress were called by FlyersRights.org to provide stronger airport security after a shooting attack at LAX airport in 2013 and again in July 2016 following the attacks in Brussels and Istanbul, but nothing was done.Now, the organization is once again demanding new emergency measures to prevent airport instances from reoccurring. These include: having the National Guard as temporary armed airport security; installing airport perimeter security to detect weapons and explosives in major airports; banning the carrying of live ammunition in checked baggage; increasing canine patrols for explosives; and placing anyone who is considered a threat by any law enforcement on the TSA Watch or No Fly list.“Those victims at Ft. Lauderdale should not have died, and should certainly not have died in vain. Blood on the ground is unfortunately too often the price for government officials to act,” said Paul Hudson, president of FlyersRights.org, former member of the TSA Aviation Security Advisory Committee and father of a Lockerbie victim.More news:  Apply now for AQSC’s agent cruise ratesFlyersRights.org also previously supported the claim of the Whistle Blower statute to TSA and Homeland Security Dept. in 2014, and successfully opposed the reintroduction of knives on planes in 2013 by the TSA. More information can be found at FlyersRights.org Tags: TSAcenter_img Travelweek Group Monday, January 9, 2017 << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

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