Mane doubtful for Bournemouth trip

first_imgLiverpool manager Jurgen Klopp has revealed that forward Sadio Mane is still recovering from a cut foot and is set to miss their match at Bournemouth on Saturday.Mane sustained a cut foot in Sunday’s Merseyside derby at Anfield, and the Bournemouth fixture comes too early for the Senegalese.“Sadio is trying to run for the first time today [Friday] but that doesn’t sound like he will be ready for Saturday,” Klopp told Sky Sports.“Hopefully he can finish the programme we did for him today.”Klopp also provided updates on the condition of defensive duo Dejan Lovren and Nathaniel Clyne.divock origi, liverpoolReport: Origi cause Klopp injury concerns George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Divock Origi injury in today’s game against Newcastle is a cause for concern for Jurgen Klopp.Perhaps with one eye on Tuesday’s trip to Italy…“He will not be available,” Klopp said about Lovren.“He got concussed last week and is still not able to play.“Clyne has been out for two weeks. It’s nothing serious but he’s not in training, so he’s not available either.”Klopp will welcome the return of Dominic Solanke, who will be back to full training on Sunday.last_img read more

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Phulkari takes me back to my childhood Gursharan

first_imgThe accomplishment of a Punjabi bride, her mother and the affluence of the family were traditionally judged by the number of ‘phulkari’ and ‘bagh’ textiles – two ancient thread crafts of Punjab and what is now Haryana – they made. Gursharan Kaur, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s wife, said Tuesday phulkari took her back to her childhood.‘We had a trunk of phulkari. It was a tradition to give the bride a phulkari at the time of marriage. My grandmother, whom we called ‘beiji’ said girls could embroider phulkari’ in the moonlight. We accepted her explanation. But then I saw girls embroidering phulkari in the moonlight,’ Gursharan Kaur recalls. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Inaugurating an exhibition, ‘Phulkari – From the Realm of Women’s Creativity’ at the Indira Gandhi National Centre for Arts (IGNCA) Tuesday, she she remembered her grandmother applying ‘surma’ till the last days of her life. ‘She would stand in front of the looking glass and put surma around her eyes and I think that was the secret of her good eyesight’. ‘Every household had a spinning wheel and then would spin cotton,’ Kaur said, adding that ‘phulkari and bagh were not just special from the point of view of handicrafts but also for its social, emotional and cultural values which were rare’. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe exhibition, which is on till 3 May, is an effort to promote traditional Indian and culture, is celebrating the legacy of the craft and the problems it has been facing in the last 20 years with workshops, seminars and demonstrations of the craft. It is one of the silver jubilee initiatives of the centre, which turned 25 last years. The collection of colourful hand-spun textiles embroidered with phulkari and bagh in rich colours of red, blue, yellow, white and gold has been curated from the archives of IGNCA . The centre purchased the collection of more than 50 woven textiles dating from the 19th century to the early 20th century from a trader in 1994. The embroidery traditions of Punjab and and what is now Haryana date to more than 500 years and have been battling to survive in the face of resource constraints, exploitation by middlemen in villages and competitions from synthetic fabric and designer wear. Embroidered with silk thread, phulkari is a shawl made by the mother for her young daughter and daughter in-law. Phulkari literary means floral work and is sometimes known as ‘bagh’, which means a garden. They are known for their geometric and figurative iconography.last_img read more

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Surviving a Subpoena

first_img Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. The department of Justice’s demand earlier this year that Google turn over customer search records has thrown a spotlight on data privacy. The Feds aren’t the only ones seeking a peek–electronic-privacy consultant Ray Everett-Church says lawyers often seek electronic records to build their cases.Google’s case may have nothing to do with your business. But if your company has electronic data, a court can subpoena it. Fighting a court order can be costly, but handing over your database can expose trade secrets and leave customers feeling violated.The good news: If a business opposes the subpoena, lawyers will often look to other sources, says Everett-Church. Google contends the DOJ could get better information doing its own online searches.There are several arguments a company can make against giving up its data, says John Bagby, co-director of the Institute for Information Policy at Pennsylvania State University. It may be too difficult and costly for the company to comply, or the information may be more easily available elsewhere. Or perhaps the request is too broad. Google claimed all of the above and won a partial victory in March–the company had to hand over only a fraction of the data sought by the DOJ.Smart businesses should plan ahead to avert costly legal bills, says Electronic Frontier Foundation staff attorney Kevin Bankston. Two tips:Stop keeping data you dont need. Establish an electronic-records destruction schedule, and stick to it religiously. “They can’t subpoena what you don’t have,” Bankston says.Consider encryption. According to Bankston, businesses can set up privacy codes so the customer holds the password. Then, when the Feds come knocking, all the company has is gobbledygook.One warning: If a subpoena comes, halt all document destruction until the matter is resolved. Remember, obstruction of justice is what landed Martha Stewart in prison. This story appears in the June 2006 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals June 1, 2006 2 min read Register Now »last_img read more

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As Tablet Wars Heat Up Apples New iPads Get Serious Upgrades

first_img 4 min read Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Not that Apple would ever admit it, but the new line of iPads launched today are responding to some key challenges that have emerged as the tablet market has grown more crowded and fierce.New research from Gartner shows that tablet shipments are expected to jump 53 percent this year, compared to 2012. Apple can no longer take for granted its initial dominance in this fast-growing and increasingly diverse market. Consumers want choices — which may explain why in September Android tablets collectively overtook iPads as the most popular type of tablet.Today Apple unveiled the new iPad Air: a thinner, lighter full-size tablet. Apple also announced upgrades to the iPad Mini.Here’s a look at some of the new features and what they mean for consumers.Weight: One of the main criticisms of full-size (10-inch) tablets has been their weight. So lighter is probably the biggest benefit of the iPad Air. This device weighs just one pound, down from 1.4 pounds for the iPad 2. For a device that you’d likely hold in your hands for significant chunks of time (reading books, watching videos, video calling, etc.) the decreased weight would make it less tiring to hold your iPad longer — something users are likely to value.Meanwhile, most other 10-inch tablets still weigh in at around 1.3 to 1.4 pounds. The newly released Microsoft Surface 2 weighs in at more than 2 pounds, not even including its much-touted snap-on keyboard accessory. Microsoft doesn’t even list weight under the specs for the Surface 2, it’s probably not something they’d want to highlight.Related: Tablet Wars: Nokia Lumia 2520 vs. Microsoft Surface 2Performance: In tablets, performance has been a weak spot. Tablet users often complain about how these devices are generally slower to render images, open files, etc. compared to desktop or laptop computers.All new Apple mobile products launched today, including the iPad Air, offer faster performance thanks to Apple’s new A7 64-bit processor — which debuted earlier this year with the iPhone 5S, and has been getting positive reviews. They also all feature MIMO Wi-Fi, which offers faster data throughput (up to 300 mbps), and a Retina display (now also on the new iPad Mini). These hardware features should make the new Apple mobile devices feel noticeably snappier and more responsive than many competing devices.Cost: This has gotten to be a key market pressure for tablets. Apple has always been able to sell their products at a substantial price premium, but they appear to be less ambitious in terms of pricing for the iPad Air.The iPad Air should be available in retail stores November 1. Prices for the iPad Air start at $499 for Wi-Fi only ($629 Wi-Fi + cellular, including LTE on some carriers), making it the highest-end iPad offering. If that’s too pricey, Apple is continuing to sell the full-size iPad 2, and it has dropped its price as it now starts at $399 for Wi-Fi and $529 for Wi-Fi + 3G.This means the iPad Air isn’t hugely more expensive than Google’s Nexus 10 tablet (Wi-Fi only, starts at $399), and it’s also less pricey than the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1- 2014 Edition, which starts at $529 for Wi-Fi only. So, quietly, Apple’s mobile products are easing off on the premium pricing.Related: Why iPads Are the New Retail Design Must HaveFor the first couple of years after the debut of the first iPad, Apple contended that the 10-inch tablets were what consumers wanted. So the company didn’t debut the 7-inch iPad Mini until last year, well after several other 7-inch tablets had hit the market (including the unexpectedly popular, though lower-performing, Kindle Fire tablets from Amazon). But new research from Gartner shows that smaller tablets are highly popular: 47 percent of consumers surveyed own a tablet that’s 8 inches or less.One of the main attractions of smaller tablets, aside from how they’re more portable, is the smaller price tag. The new iPad Mini with a 7.9-inch Retina display, which will be available later in November, starts at $399 for Wi-Fi ($529 for Wi-Fi plus cellular, including LTE on some carriers).Apple also will continue to sell the original iPad Mini (no Retina display), and it has dropped the starting price to $299 (down from $329). This puts an iPad Mini in at roughly comparable price range to the new 7-inch Kindle Fire HDX, which starts at $229 — but for that extra $70, iPad Mini users get markedly superior features, performance and battery life.Related: Turn a Smartphone Into a Virus-Detecting Microscope? Yep. It’s Happening. October 22, 2013 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Register Now »last_img read more

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Emerging Markets Are the Next Frontier of 3D Printing

first_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now » 6 min read On its surface, 3-D printing seems like a failed gamble. Technologists once envisioned that it would open a world of opportunity: Simply input the design, spool up the 3-D printer, and sit back to watch as your imagination became plastic. However, due to a range of economic and practical factors, 3-D printing has yet to find the widespread successes that some may have hoped for.Still, it’s too early to call 3-D printing a failed technology. Instead, 3-D printing offers some unique opportunities for entrepreneurs interested in expanding into emerging markets. To succeed, however, startups will have to pivot to more specialized uses — such as printing apartments to address rising housing demand or prosthetic limbs for amputees.The flaws of consumer 3-D printers.For consumers, avoiding 3-D printers is a logical decision. They’re tricky, temperamental machines which require a lot of special knowledge and care — and more time and money than the average person can afford. Even hobbyists enroll in shared makerspaces rather than buying their own machine.Related: Should I Join the Makerspace Revolution?Consider how much work it takes to effectively use a 3-D printer. A team at Mashable experimented with 3-D printing — to their dismay. First, the printer was finicky about what types of files it accepted; the team had to convert their design into several file formats before finding the right one. Next, the device wasn’t exactly forgiving; any mistakes required an immediate do-over, which wasted plastic, time, and electricity. Six attempts and 24 hours later, the team finally gave up.The challenges of emerging markets.But for all its annoyances, 3-D printing does have promise for emerging markets — which might seem counterintuitive. After all, if richer nations reject 3-D printers, why would it be any different in less prosperous ones?Yet first impressions are misleading. In emerging markets, 3-D printing technology is expected to become a $4.5 billion industry by 2020, growing by some 37.4 percent between 2014-2020. Most of this growth is expected to take place in India and China.So what gives? The appeal of 3-D printing lies in its potential to solve several lingering problems common to emerging markets. The most common issue is an infrastructure gap (a lack of roads, medical clinics or schools); by nature, these projects require plenty of capital, time and skilled labor, all of which emerging markets may lack.As a result, 3-D printing can be a shortcut. Not only does it build durable, workable solutions for far less money — but it is also a form of leapfrogging, where emerging markets can take advantage of exciting new technologies (such as blockchain) while bypassing early stages of development. For example, startup M-Kopa used mobile money payments and home solar power kits to provide decentralized electricity directly to Kenyan households. By doing so, M-Kopa effectively leapfrogged the problem of building an electrical grid — a complex, expensive undertaking for a developing economy.For emerging markets, 3-D printing is a solution.In much the same way, 3-D printers can help emerging markets meet entrenched challenges. In China, an emerging market reveling in its newfound prosperity, 3-D printing has been adopted by the housing sector. Domestically, the demand for residential construction is strong–and shows no sign of abating.McKinsey estimates that by 2025, the nation’s low-income urban households could rise by 56 million, with Shanghai and Beijing accounting for 2.3 million and 2.5 million households respectively. Needless to say, all of these people will need cheap, comfortable units that are efficiently and sustainably built.Three dimensional printing is the unlikely answer. In April 2014, a team of construction workers assembled ten buildings (each five stories tall) in the southern city of Suzhou, all from 3-D printed parts, and all in a single day’s work. Though these structures, built by Chinese firm Winsun, are meant as a prototype and not a final product, the demonstration was a stunning proof of concept. Costs and time are dramatically reduced; rather than designing and building each structure individually, workers can simply put together prefabricated parts from a kit, or mix-and-match for greater variety.Related: A San Francisco Startup 3-D Printed a Whole House in 24 HoursMoreover, advances in engineering have resulted in materials like fiber-reinforced Ductal, 10 times stronger than concrete with twice the shelf life — and tailor-made for 3-D printers. At some point in the future, it may even be possible to 3-D print sustainable houses: some design agencies are experimenting with upcycling, repurposing waste products into building material, thus lowering costs and reducing the need for landfills.Though this space is still maturing, competition is already intense. In addition to Winsun, California-based startups Contour Crafting and Apis Cor are also helping to push 3-D printed houses into the mainstream. While both companies continue to focus on domestic applications, the bulk of their growth may well come from emerging markets–a lesson any 3-D printing entrepreneur (or venture capitalist) would do well to note.3-D printing new limbs.But it’s not just housing. Many stable, growing emerging markets today were once areas of conflict. Though they’ve come a long way from those dark times, they still grapple with the legacy of war — the most visible, prominent reminder being amputees.Unfortunately, amputees in emerging markets find that prosthetics are hard to come by — and prosthetists are even rarer. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there is a shortage of 40,000 prosthetists in developing economies. Moreover, the cost of a prosthetic is prohibitively expensive: high-end limbs with electronic components (such as microprocessors) can cost up to $150,000, while cheaper pneumatic ones range from $40,000 to $60,000.Thanks to 3-D printing, however, change may finally be coming. Rather than making difficult journeys to a distant prosthetist clinic, 3-D printers can cheaply and efficiently print limbs. One Stanford pilot program pioneered a replacement knee — for $20. Known as the Jaipur Foot, the limb is a cutting-edge piece of technology that provides amputees an unparalleled level of stability and easy movement–a far cry from the more expensive, less usable prosthetics they may have grown accustomed to.Related: What 3-D Printing Means for the Independent InventorFurther, designs and fittings are much easier. Rather than requiring prolonged stays for multi-day fittings, prosthetists can simply use 3-D scanners and computer-assisted design software (CAD) to tinker with artificial limbs. Moreover, for growing children, designs can easily and quickly be scaled up or tweaked; many schematics are open source files and can be adapted with a click of a mouse.In emerging markets, there is real opportunity — and hope — for 3-D printing. Though the applications are likely far from what starry-eyed technologists dreamed of only a few short years ago, plenty of people are reaping its benefits. From families who can live in affordable, comfortable homes to survivors of war and famine who can finally work and function again, 3-D printing is a boon to developing economies as they make their way towards prosperity.  Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. December 23, 2017 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.last_img read more

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