Uber launches JUMP Scooters in San Diego

first_imgUber launches JUMP Scooters in San Diego December 19, 2018 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Ride-booking service Uber will launch dockless JUMP e-scooters in San Diego Wednesday, the fourth city in the U.S. the company will be serving.Uber acquired JUMP, a bikeshare company, in May to expand its public transit offerings. Uber expanded JUMP’s e-bike service to San Diego last month, dispersing 300 bikes around the city from Pacific Beach to downtown. San Diego is the fourth city to receive the scooters, joining Los Angeles, Santa Monica and Austin, Texas.The scooters work similarly to JUMP bikes in that riders use the main Uber app to unlock one and start a ride. They look strikingly similar to Lime scooters but with a red and black color scheme.Uber is offering free rides and free helmets through Jan. 9, 2019, to celebrate the rollout. Residents can receive up to five 30-minute rides per day, with scooters costing $1 to unlock and $0.10 per minute after the free rides have been exhausted. Residents can learn more about Uber’s JUMP services at jump.com. KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Updated: 9:18 PM Posted: December 19, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings Categories: Local San Diego News, Traffic & Accidents FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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Research duo suggest possible explanation for rapid growth of seed black holes

first_img More information: Rapid growth of seed black holes in the early universe by supra-exponential accretion, Science DOI: 10.1126/science.1251053ABSTRACTMass accretion by black holes (BHs) is typically capped at the Eddington rate, when radiation’s push balances gravity’s pull. However, even exponential growth at the Eddington-limited e-folding time tE ~ few×0.01 Gyr, is too slow to grow stellar-mass BH seeds into the supermassive luminous quasars that are observed when the universe is 1 Gyr old. We propose a dynamical mechanism that can trigger supra-exponential accretion in the early universe, when a BH seed is trapped in a star cluster fed by the ubiquitous dense cold gas flows. The high gas opacity traps the accretion radiation, while the low-mass BH’s random motions suppress the formation of a slowly draining accretion disk. Supra-exponential growth can thus explain the puzzling emergence of supermassive BHs that power luminous quasars so soon after the Big Bang.Press release © 2014 Phys.org Journal information: Science This graphic shows the center of a newly formed star cluster (stars are in yellow), within which the seed black hole gets its super boost of gas (shown in blue). Explore further Citation: Research duo suggest possible explanation for rapid growth of seed black holes in early universe (2014, August 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-08-duo-explanation-rapid-growth-seed.htmlcenter_img Black hole that doesn’t emit x-rays discovered near massive star (Phys.org) —A pair of researchers, Tal Alexander of the Weizmann Institute of Science, in Israel and Priyamvada Natarajan with Yale University in the U.S. has come up with a possible explanation for the rapid growth of black holes believed to have existed in the early universe. In their paper published in the journal Science, the two propose that early black holes could have grown much more rapidly than those observed today due to dense gases that existed at the time that allowed for rapid growth in the absence of an accretion disk. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Black holes are thought to exist at the center of most if not all galaxies—but contrary to popular science fiction, they don’t simply suck in everything around them like a vacuum cleaner—if that were the case planet Earth would have been sucked into the black hole at the center of the Milky Way long ago. Materials are pulled into a black hole, but are slowed by the buildup of an accretion disk. That disk means that materials can only be pulled in along the plane of the disk. There is also the problem of materials colliding as they are pulled closer, generating enough energetic radiation to push other material away from the black hole. While this all makes sense in the modern era, it causes problems for space scientists seeking to figure out how everything got to where it is now—most theories point to super-massive black holes forming shortly after the Big Bang. But, how did they grow so big so fast?Alexander and Natarajan think they may have the answer—they note that shortly after the Big Bang, the universe was of course, much smaller and denser. Cold dense gas, they suggest, in the vicinity of a black hole would not have been susceptible to causing heat creation due to collisions. But perhaps more importantly, the gravity pull from other nearby stars could have caused black holes to move around in odd, erratic fashion, preventing the creation of an accretion disk. That in turn would mean material could be pulled into the black hole from every direction, greatly increasing the speed at which it would build in mass.A model the two built based on their ideas, suggests such a scenario could lead to a black hole starting with ten times the mass of our modern sun, growing to something ten billion times as big in just a billion years.last_img read more

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As Tablet Wars Heat Up Apples New iPads Get Serious Upgrades

first_img 4 min read Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Not that Apple would ever admit it, but the new line of iPads launched today are responding to some key challenges that have emerged as the tablet market has grown more crowded and fierce.New research from Gartner shows that tablet shipments are expected to jump 53 percent this year, compared to 2012. Apple can no longer take for granted its initial dominance in this fast-growing and increasingly diverse market. Consumers want choices — which may explain why in September Android tablets collectively overtook iPads as the most popular type of tablet.Today Apple unveiled the new iPad Air: a thinner, lighter full-size tablet. Apple also announced upgrades to the iPad Mini.Here’s a look at some of the new features and what they mean for consumers.Weight: One of the main criticisms of full-size (10-inch) tablets has been their weight. So lighter is probably the biggest benefit of the iPad Air. This device weighs just one pound, down from 1.4 pounds for the iPad 2. For a device that you’d likely hold in your hands for significant chunks of time (reading books, watching videos, video calling, etc.) the decreased weight would make it less tiring to hold your iPad longer — something users are likely to value.Meanwhile, most other 10-inch tablets still weigh in at around 1.3 to 1.4 pounds. The newly released Microsoft Surface 2 weighs in at more than 2 pounds, not even including its much-touted snap-on keyboard accessory. Microsoft doesn’t even list weight under the specs for the Surface 2, it’s probably not something they’d want to highlight.Related: Tablet Wars: Nokia Lumia 2520 vs. Microsoft Surface 2Performance: In tablets, performance has been a weak spot. Tablet users often complain about how these devices are generally slower to render images, open files, etc. compared to desktop or laptop computers.All new Apple mobile products launched today, including the iPad Air, offer faster performance thanks to Apple’s new A7 64-bit processor — which debuted earlier this year with the iPhone 5S, and has been getting positive reviews. They also all feature MIMO Wi-Fi, which offers faster data throughput (up to 300 mbps), and a Retina display (now also on the new iPad Mini). These hardware features should make the new Apple mobile devices feel noticeably snappier and more responsive than many competing devices.Cost: This has gotten to be a key market pressure for tablets. Apple has always been able to sell their products at a substantial price premium, but they appear to be less ambitious in terms of pricing for the iPad Air.The iPad Air should be available in retail stores November 1. Prices for the iPad Air start at $499 for Wi-Fi only ($629 Wi-Fi + cellular, including LTE on some carriers), making it the highest-end iPad offering. If that’s too pricey, Apple is continuing to sell the full-size iPad 2, and it has dropped its price as it now starts at $399 for Wi-Fi and $529 for Wi-Fi + 3G.This means the iPad Air isn’t hugely more expensive than Google’s Nexus 10 tablet (Wi-Fi only, starts at $399), and it’s also less pricey than the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1- 2014 Edition, which starts at $529 for Wi-Fi only. So, quietly, Apple’s mobile products are easing off on the premium pricing.Related: Why iPads Are the New Retail Design Must HaveFor the first couple of years after the debut of the first iPad, Apple contended that the 10-inch tablets were what consumers wanted. So the company didn’t debut the 7-inch iPad Mini until last year, well after several other 7-inch tablets had hit the market (including the unexpectedly popular, though lower-performing, Kindle Fire tablets from Amazon). But new research from Gartner shows that smaller tablets are highly popular: 47 percent of consumers surveyed own a tablet that’s 8 inches or less.One of the main attractions of smaller tablets, aside from how they’re more portable, is the smaller price tag. The new iPad Mini with a 7.9-inch Retina display, which will be available later in November, starts at $399 for Wi-Fi ($529 for Wi-Fi plus cellular, including LTE on some carriers).Apple also will continue to sell the original iPad Mini (no Retina display), and it has dropped the starting price to $299 (down from $329). This puts an iPad Mini in at roughly comparable price range to the new 7-inch Kindle Fire HDX, which starts at $229 — but for that extra $70, iPad Mini users get markedly superior features, performance and battery life.Related: Turn a Smartphone Into a Virus-Detecting Microscope? Yep. It’s Happening. October 22, 2013 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Register Now »last_img read more

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