Living in the moment

first_imgHer latest exhibition titled Time and Moments is based on this simple question.Time is an essential dimension of the universe and it is an essential component of life. We don’t see time but still everything moves around the intangible time. Moments are experience of life in present. It has nothing to do with time. For example, in the night when we see stars in open sky we feel them as real. But the fact is quite different. The star we saw as twinkling might have died ages back and what we see is just the light of star that is still travelling. So the experience of our moment have no connection with time. Moments are here and now. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The artist explains, ‘Living in time dimension and living in moments can make the life entirely different. In the time dimension comes, past, present and future and this is how we know to live. But in moments all these dimensions of time goes off and only experience remains. The pure experience of the present.’ Time helps us manage and organize the living in much better way. But at the same time, time driven life gets dull and monotonous. Its unfortunate that as we grow and move away from childlike lifestyle our life starts revolving only around time and living the life as it comes in moments, slowly fades away. Time is more about improving standard of living and moments are more about quality of life experience. When we remember good or bad time of the past, we mainly remember those moments only that made the experience eternal for us.She further explains,  ‘The modern man is living longer life, more advanced, having more knowledge of world around us but unfortunately this modern man is less lively and devoid of self-knowledge.The stress and frustration is increasing and time is becoming precious commodity. In securing better and better tomorrow the modern man is losing every moment, which is full of life.’last_img read more

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Ben Stokes Joe Root lead England fight back against Kiwis

first_imgNew Zealand-born Ben Stokes took charge of England’s recovery before falling agonisingly short of a hundred on the first day of the first Test at Lord’s. At tea, England were 219 for five.They had been 30 for four when Durham all-rounder Stokes came in but his dashing 92 helped revive their fortunes during a stand of 161 with Joe Root (80 not out).Jos Buttler was unbeaten on 13 at tea.After celebrated former umpire Dickie Bird rang the five-minute bell, New Zealand captain Brendon McCullum saw his decision to field first vindicated with the fall of four early wickets, including two for debutant fast bowler Matt Henry. Also Read – Khel Ratna for Deepa and Bajrang, Arjuna for JadejaAll three of New Zealand’s frontline quicks, plus McCullum himself, had only arrived in England just days before this match after stints in the Indian Premier League. But there were few signs of rustiness as they made the most of a green-tinged pitch, albeit the skies above Lord’s were largely sunny and blue.Instead debutant England opener Adam Lyth, selected after Jonathan Trott retired following a run of low scores during the disappointing 1-1 series draw in the West Indies, was caught behind off Tim Southee for seven. Also Read – Endeavour is to facilitate smooth transition: ShastriThe 100th Test between England and New Zealand then saw the hosts three wickets for five runs in 15 balls.Trent Boult had Gary Ballance caught at third slip for one before England captain Alastair Cook, who had made 16, fell when, beaten for pace by 23-year-old Canterbury quick Henry, he top-edged an attempted hook through to wicket-keeper BJ Watling.Henry then produced another classic fast bowler’s delivery to dismiss Ian Bell for one, a full-length ball pitching on off stump and holding its line. Root, recently installed as England’s vice-captain, had a nervy moment on 36 when he was struck on the back leg after missing a sweep against off-spinner Mark Craig but survived New Zealand’s lbw review. At lunch, England were 113 for four with Root 49 not out and left-hander Stokes unbeaten 36.After the interval, Root completed a 53-ball fifty. But it was Stokes — the son of former New Zealand rugby league international Ged Stokes but brought up in England — who really took the attack to the tourists. He went from 64 to 89 in just 11 balls, including a pulled six off Henry an a couple of superbly-timed clips for four through midwicket off Boult.New Zealand, with Tom Latham replacing the injured Watling behind the stumps, struggled to check the flow of runs. However, Stokes — eyeing what would have been just his second Test hundred following his brilliant 120 against Australia at Perth in December 2013 — then played a key role in his own downfall.  The 23-year-old left a delivery from Craig only to see the ball come down the Lord’s slope and clatter into his stumps.A disbelieving Stokes walked off slowly, having faced just 94 balls, including 15 fours and a six, in a bold, counter-attacking stand with Root that had taken England to 191 for five.last_img read more

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