Self-belief, the power of love

first_imgLove yourself. It is important to stay positive because beauty comes from the inside out.” – Jenn Proske‘Charity begins at home’, as a cliché it is so overly quoted. But it holds a profound truth, that to leave a lasting impact in life, you need to be healthy and live a wholesome life. Your ability for sharing and caring will increase manifolds if you inculcate tremendous self-belief. And of course, self-love that gives immense power and fulfilling life.Until that respect is there for self, others will also follow your lead. Most of the time a person makes a decision to please others and out of a feeling of guilt. While it is important to live in harmony and empathy, it is equally important to respect your own self.Some people equate self-love with selfishness. But that’s not true. When your thinking leads you astray in this manner, it becomes difficult to take good care of yourself. Obliterate that restrictive belief from your cognizance. Ensure to face the world with a new belief that resonates in your mind, ‘I need to take care of my needs first.’ To be the best version of yourself, you need to love yourself and ignite your soul in self-appreciation.It feels natural to take good care of your body, mind, and spirit. It’s true that love begets love to enable you to spread goodness. You will have more energies to share when you are in accord with your own self. It has a reflective impact on how we see ourselves and how we treat ourselves. Being a recipient of love is possible if you are content, happy and confident in self-belief.Another aspect that substantiates the phrase of self-love is that no one has a better comprehension of your innermost feelings and desires than you do. Your experiences are your own, your pain is also very personal. Even when you try to share with others, they may empathize, but never quite experience life the same way you do. For another person to know you in totality, is rare and cannot equal your own perception of self. When you hold yourself in high esteem, you’re more likely to select things that foster your happiness and assist you well. These things may be in the form of eating healthy, exercising or having healthy relationships.It is also important in setting boundaries in relationships and having a clear understanding. As you value yourself, you’re more likely to have fulfilling relationships. Your relationship with yourself sets the character for the relationships you have with others. When you treat yourself with love and respect, you give others a similar perspective. I have seen first-hand a lack of self-love can derail someone’s career and chances for success.So, stand tall. It’s self-appreciation. Not selfishness.last_img read more

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How religious leaders are adapting to keep the faith as coronavirus cancels mass gatherings

first_imgiStock(NEW YORK) — As people around the world adjust their daily routines in response to the coronavirus pandemic, the new limits on social gatherings have impacted a societal norm that might have once seemed unwavering and untouchable: religious services.Faith leaders across the United States are now tasked with keeping their congregations connected and involved amid what can feel like a trying test of faith.“It’s a time of uncertainty and fear and people feel that it’s an opportunity to realize that God does not abandon us in these times, he walks with us,” Archbishop Aymond said.Walid said in addition to staying away from large gatherings, he recommends people do their best to quell their anxiety by reflecting with family and take breaks from consuming news.“People should take proper precautions, but don’t fall into despair,” Walid said. “We look at these times as a test that comes from God, and with proper precautions and patience, we can get out of this.”“Here’s what I recommend: Don’t fall into anxiety over watching too much news, rather do things with family and try to relax,” he continued. “Do things to take your mind off the crisis and get you back into life. You can get overwhelmed by too much information and fear.”Although Ain’s role has changed as she faces this new challenge, she said that overcoming strife is not new to the Jewish community.“Now, more than ever, I’m trying to keep people physically safe and spiritually connected. In Jewish history, there have been times of strife and trouble, so this isn’t new,” she said. “We adapt, as we have for thousands of years.”The key difference now, she said, is the availability of technology. With live streaming, she said she now holds twice daily services, and that people have been logging in not just from inside the U.S. but from countries like Canada, Israel and Uganda as well.“I now livestream Shabbat every Friday evening and Saturday morning,” Ain said. “My membership also started a phone tree and outreach program to make sure we are checking in on the elderly and the needy.”Our God is near and asks us to be near to one another. Perhaps right now we cannot draw near physically to others for fear of contagion, but we can reawaken in ourselves a habit of drawing near to others through prayer and mutual help. #HomilySantaMartaWhen it comes to the Catholic community, Aymond said he also uses live streams to circumvent the restrictions on mass gatherings during this Lenten season.“We are live streaming masses online and on television. I’m writing spiritual pieces on social media,” Aymond said. “I want to remind people to not only get what they can from the TV and the Internet, but also the Bible. We can seek out those traditional resources, too.”All three religions have major holidays rapidly approaching — Easter, Passover and Ramadan all begin in the coming weeks — and each leader offered advice to their followers who might feel lost while observing this year.Walid said that Ramadan, which begins April 23 and ends May 23, is a particular “concern.”“Because we have nightly prayers together and daily classes on the Quran at mosque. It’s the one time of the year that Muslims who never come to mosque during the year, show up,” he explained.“Folks need to remember that you can stay connected as a community even if you can’t do it in person. I’ve seen families organizing Zoom calls for kids and other communities,” Walid reiterated.Ain said she has seen changes when it comes to other major Jewish events, such as Bar and Bat Mitzvahs.“Some are holding very small gatherings, while other families are choosing to change their dates,” she said. “And I’ve seen caterers still offering kosher meals for takeout for those who need them.”Aymond said there may not be an immediate lesson that folks can leearn from this challenging moment, but he said that ultimately, it’s time to “trust in your faith.”“I think what we do know is that in times like these, it doesn’t make a difference if you’re rich or poor, what your ideology is or even your political party,” he said, “it affects everyone.”“But it also brings us together and it can certainly increase our trust. Real faith is when you walk by trust and not by sight. If we saw everything, it wouldn’t be faith,” he added. “So trust in your faith.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Kensington coach park closure

first_imgTesco Kensington coach park, on West Cromwell Road in London, is to close on Tuesday 31 January.Coaches will no longer be able to park at Tesco KensingtonThe area has been sold to a development company with the plan to build a block of flats on the site.According to Rod from Euro Car Parks, the closure was anticipated, but wasn’t expected until at least two years from now.He wishes all drivers and operators luck in the future and says: “Thank you all for your custom and goodwill.”last_img

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Champlain Oil donates more than $2,500 for the Bissonette Family recreation area

first_imgLocal CITGO Marketer Champlain Oil Co.raised $2,530.60 by collecting three cents from every gallon of gas purchased in the month of April at the Hinesburg Jiffy Mart for the construction of a new recreational facility, the Bissonette Family Recreation Area. The 11-acre recreational facility located off Shelburne Falls Road will accommodate youth and adult recreation programs and provide adequate recreation space to support the town’s athletic programs.”We want to thank our great customers for helping make this donation possible. We kept hearing our customers complain about how much time it took to go to a field in another town just so their kids could play. When we heard about the plan to build a nearby recreation center, we jumped at the opportunity to help fundraise for the construction,” said Jiffy Mart manager Kristi Brown. “We know the facility will be a great asset to our community, and it definitely took a community to build it. We look forward to crossing the road and watching tons of games.”For many years, the Town of Hinesburg did not have the space to support its athletic programs, leaving youth programs scattered throughout the town and forcing residents to travel to surrounding towns in order to participate in team sports. In 2011, local farmer, the late Wayne Bissonette, and his family donated 11 acres of land to the Town of Hinesburg to be used as the Bissonette Family Recreation Area. This facility will include two full-size, multi‐purpose fields for soccer, football and lacrosse, a Little League baseball field, a “tot lot” playground, parking, restrooms and storage. To learn more about this project, visitwww.hinesburg.org(link is external).The campaign for the recreation area is just one way in which Champlain Oil gives back to the local community. Other examples include annual fundraising for the Muscular Dystrophy Association through a golf tournament and donations within its Jiffy Mart locations and also sponsorships for local youth sports teams, including the Charlotte Little League and CSSU Buccaneers football.Founded in the 1940s, Champlain Oil Company is an innovative leader in the wholesale fuel and convenience store industries and has grown into one of the largest, independent gasoline, diesel and kerosene distributors in Vermont and New Hampshire. Champlain Oil works with the Trucking Fleet and individual independent dealers to help them structure a business model and insure their success. Champlain Oil currently owns 32 Jiffy Mart locations throughout Vermont and New Hampshire. For more information, visit www.champlainoil.com(link is external).CITGO is committed to giving back to the local communities it serves through its network of locally owned stations. CITGO Marketers and Retailers in Vermont and New Hampshire own and operate nearly 140 CITGO locations and are proud to support their communities. For more information on the positive impact of the locally owned CITGO stations, visit www.CITGO.com(link is external).CITGO, based in Houston, is a refiner, transporter and marketer of transportation fuels, lubricants, petrochemicals and other industrial products. The company is owned by PDV America, Inc., an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A., the national oil company of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela. For more information, visit www.CITGO.com(link is external).SOURCE SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt., May 29, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — CITGOlast_img read more

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Bar ‘entity’ model points to ‘fused’ profession

first_imgTwo innovative legal businesses provide further evidence of the growing convergence of the bar and solicitor branches of the profession, enabled by the bar regulator’s ‘entity’ model.They comprise a barrister’s business which remunerates barristers in a similar way to solicitors; and a solicitor opting to register with the bar regulator to cut costs.The businesses are among 44 entities now registered by the Bar Standards Board. Both opted for the model in part because they felt the two branches were gradually becoming fused.Merseyside barrister Richard Gray told the Gazette that he decided to set up his civil practice, Elysium Law, as an entity, as he thought it offered a more ‘progressive’ way of running the business. Gray is operating as a single-person entity but plans to bring in other barristers who would be paid a salary commensurate with their stake in the business.He said: ‘If you have got a group of barristers who have got shares in their own company, it encourages cohesion among counsel to run the chambers.’Gray said the current payment model, where barristers pay a percentage of their income to chambers, is ‘not tenable’. He said it has ‘bred resentment’ among barristers who have high incomes against those who contribute less to chambers.’No other business works like that. If you are a solicitor, you use timesheets so there is always an incentive to work hard,’ he said.He plans to set up his business as an online chambers in order to keep costs down. He said the overheads at traditional chambers are not compatible with the now financially straitened publicly funded bar. Elysium Law provides services in employment law, wills and probate, and tax planning. Gray is also considering recruiting a solicitor to the firm, as he said there are advantages to having a ‘fused set’. He said: ‘While the rules for barristers and solicitors are different, our interests are the same and if we are under the same roof that would only enhance our work.’Newcastle solicitor Lee Dowling (pictured) has opted to set up his business, LMD Law, as an entity in order to cut his overheads. The bar’s mutual indemnity insurance and lower authorisation fees made it cheaper to be licensed by the BSB than the Solicitors Regulation Authority, he said. Dowling said: ‘It does make a difference being able to keep costs to a minimum and being able pass the cost savings on to cost-sensitive clients.’LMD Law serves small and medium-sized business in areas including litigation, property law and employment law.Initially it will operate as a virtual firm, but Dowling said he is looking for small premises. Although he has no firm plans to hire a barrister, he said the entity structure would allow the business to make use of the resources that members of the bar can bring.Dowling said that while the bar would continue to focus on specialised advocacy, an ‘informal fusing’ of the two branches of the profession was already in progress.Meanwhile, one of the barristers to set up an SRA-licensed alternative business structure claimed that clients are responding well to the business.ARP Legal was set up by five barristers from 5 St Andrew’s Hill, London. One of the five, Ben Keith, said the firm had so far represented Sarah Tighe, the wife of Tom Hayes, during the Libor trial, and that it had worked on two cases involving the enforcement of foreign orders in the UK.He said the model was ‘much easier’ than taking on direct access work, as more than one barrister could work on the same case, meaning the barristers have been taking on larger cases than before.last_img read more

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