Season of the Dragons

first_imgSummer is reaching its end in the Flathead, but instead of going quietly into the colder weather, the valley will be alive with roars and the rhythmic thumping of drums on the lake: It’s the season for dragons.A horde will descend upon Flathead Lake on Sept. 13 and 14 for the Montana Dragon Boat Festival.The festival is a celebration of the summer and the transition to fall, and a celebration of the human spirit. Teams of 22 – a drummer, 20 paddlers and a steerer – work together in unison to propel their massive, 46-foot boats through the waves, hoping to edge out the competition at the finish line.This colorful and unique competition takes place in an idyllic Montana setting, with the crowd gathering on the lakeshore at the Flathead Lake Lodge in Bigfork to watch the teams paddle.It’s the third year for the dragon boat festival, and the Kalispell Convention and Visitors Bureau is pleased with the event’s progress.Diane Medler, KCVB director, said there would be 74 teams participating in this year’s two-day event, with 24 those groups coming from Canada and about a dozen more from around the state and region. While there are fewer total teams participating this year, the event still has the pull the KCVB was hoping for.“Last year there were 91 teams. We have the same number of out-of-market teams, it’s the local teams that have decreased,” Medler said. “The point of our doing this is to bring the out-of-market teams to the Flathead.”The KCVB established the dragon boat races as one of its major annual events to draw in more visitors to the area, and it’s especially important during the fall shoulder season.Thousands of people have attended the past couple of events, and last year the festival extended to two days to account for its popularity.On Saturday, Sept. 13, the races start at 8:30 a.m., and there is an exhibition race at 4 p.m., featuring a 1,000-meter race – much longer than the typical races – that includes turning the unwieldy boats.The Saturday events will also include the breast cancer survivor race and ceremony at noon.Sunday’s noon exhibition race will feature kids, ages 13 and over, who signed up on Saturday. They will take to the giant dragons and receive a half-hour lesson before racing (there will be experienced paddlers aboard as well).As always, there is no gate admission needed to view the dragon boat races, and there will be food and beverage vendors on site. Medler encouraged visitors to wander through the teams’ tents as well, to enjoy the decorations and meet new people.“There are lots of competitive teams this year with all these traveling teams,” she said.Parking is available at the intersections of Highways 35 and 82, and costs $10. There will be shuttles running between the festival and the parking lot, as well as the Montana Trolley taking people from the festival into Bigfork and then to the parking lot.It’s a family-friendly event, Medler said, and attendees can bring chairs and blankets to sit on, and “hopefully sunscreen will be needed.”For more information, visit www.montana.racedragonboats.com. Email Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox.last_img read more

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Carolyn “Christine” Elmer Weber Sorrells

first_img A gathering of Mrs. Sorrells’ family and friends will begin at 5:00 p.m., with a Rosary and Christian Vigil to follow at 7:00 p.m., Thursday, June 2, 2016, at Broussard’s, 2000 McFaddin Avenue, Beaumont. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10:00 a.m., Friday, June 3, 2016, at St. Jude Thaddeus Catholic Church, 6825 Gladys Avenue, Beaumont, with her interment to follow at Greenlawn Memorial Park, Groves.Memorial contributions may be made to Baptist Hospitals of Southeast Texas Foundation, 3080 College Street, Beaumont, Texas 77701; or to an animal charity of one’s choice.Complete and updated information may be found at: broussards1889.com. April 22, 1937- May 28, 2016On Saturday, May 28, 2016, Christine Sorrells quietly and peacefully entered her heavenly home. She gave those that knew her many gifts along her lifetime, but one of the greatest was to always let those she loved know how much they meant to her. When you were loved by Christine, you knew how deeply you were loved. She was a beloved Mom, Sister, Grandmother, Great-Grandmother, Aunt, Friend and Mentor to many. She was also the consummate businesswoman, starting a career long before it was in vogue for women to have them.Christine began her professional life as an Executive Secretary with Atlantic Richfield. Returning to work as her children got older, she worked for Carrier Corporation, rising in responsibility to become a leading sales woman in that industry, which was especially impressive given it was such a male-dominated business. Christine was not a feminist; in fact, just the opposite. But she was extremely smart and had the gift of intuition and perception, attributes that took her career to great heights. Christine moved into the Hospitality industry in 1985, working for Marriott International, Inc. True to form, she was a standout during her Marriott career, becoming a member of the management team at multiple hotels, handling Sales and Catering operations for events at Marriott properties in Houston including Houston Airport Marriott, Marriott in the Medical Center, and The Woodlands Waterway Marriott.After “retiring”, she began work again, serving as Director of Catering for Bando’s. Most recently, she served as Executive Director at her son’s company Associated Mechanical Services where she worked up until the day she left for heaven. Throughout her career she took on the unofficial role of mentor, becoming an example (and standard-bearer for excellence) for many young people in their careers, Carolyn Christine (“Christine,” never Carolyn!) Elmer was born on April 22, 1937 in Port Arthur, TX, to O’Brien Elmer and Carrie deValcourt Elmer. She married Mickey Weber in 1957, and moved to Nederland, Texas where she lived for several years and raised her family. In 1978 Christine had a second chance at love, marrying her best friend Gilbert Sorrells. Christine and Gil lived in Kingwood, Texas for many years, until his death in 2003, after which Christine moved to Beaumont to be closer to family.Christine told those of us close to her that she felt she had been given the gift of a wonderful life, and she was very grateful for that. But during that time, she had heartbreak too. We rejoice now that those tears have turned to joy, as those who went before her have welcomed her to heaven, and she can again be with those she lost, including her son Michael Weber, former husband Mickey Weber, husband Gilbert Sorrells, sister Beulah Morgan, and many other dear nieces, nephews and cousins as well as friends who have been awaiting her arrival in heaven.She leaves behind, with heavy hearts, sister, Doris Coon; daughters, Mary Poole and husband, David; Rebecca Richardson and husband, James; son, John Weber and wife, Kellie; grandchildren, Jacob Holzknecht and wife, Karen; Katlyn Weber and fiancé, Brian; Jacob Weber; Michael Weber and wife, Cierra; Marissa Weber; Lindsey Rutherford and husband, Trey; Megan Smith and husband, Tabor; great- grandchildren, Boston Smith and Jack Rutherford; nephew, Tommy Coon; nieces, Billie Jean Ewing and husband, Tommy; Jackie Solis and husband, Manuel; Kathy Valka; and Susan McBride and husband, Armand; in addition to many other beloved family and friends.Christine was passionate about many things: her Catholic faith, her family, her friends, her work, her garden, reading, politics, her cats, her wardrobe, good wine (white, never red), strong coffee, shopping, shoes and clothes-lots of shoes and clothes!last_img read more

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Humble Redbacks break hoodoo

first_imgBy DAVID NAGEL “Oooohhh we’re from Spiderland, boom boom boom boom … ” THE Hampton Park theme-song had not been…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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Mallard’s Team of the Week — Kootenay Rhythm Dragons

first_imgThe Kootenay Rhythm Dragons know first hand the importance of rallying around the fight against cancer. Which is why the team was right there, leading the way at the 2011 Terry Fox Run, Nelson edition, Sunday at the Lakeside waterfront. Not only is the team eager to improve the physical and psychological well being of people specifically with breast cancer, it also wants to raise community awareness of breast cancer survivorship. So well done ladies and thanks for all your hard work to raise awareness to help defeat all cancers.Mallard’s Source for Sports would like to help in any way they can by saluting the ladies with Team of the Week status. The Kootenay Rhythm Dragons include, back row, L-R, Marg McCauly, Cath Little, Dawn Jacobsen, Wendy Hughes, Sandy Price, Lauretta Bullanoff, Lorna Maxwell, Janet Stephenson, Holly Reid, Judy Sheppard and Rebecca George. Front, Judith Deon, Pat Glackin, Linda Hoffmann, Marlene Pozin, Betty Radcliffe, Bobbie Maras, Suzanne McPherson, Pat Gibson and Sylvia Smith.last_img read more

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Latam Eco Review: Wandering hippos, condor central, and the macaw trade

first_imgBirds, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Fisheries, Fishing, Illegal Fishing, Illegal Trade, Pet Trade, Wildlife, Wildlife Trafficking Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Top stories from our Spanish-language service, Mongabay Latam, last week followed high-flying condors to their lowland home; hippos wandering through Colombia’s jungles; and scarlet macaws in their last holdout in Central America.Ecuador’s León River is ‘condor central’No matter how high or how far Ecuador’s condors soar, they always return home to a semi-desert, lowland ecosystem around the León River. A Wildlife Conservation Study warns that if changes to the condors’ habitat happen twice as fast as now, they will go extinct in 60 years. A 2015 census put the condor population at between 94 and 102 individuals.There are fewer than 25 Andean condor mating pairs left in Ecuador. Image courtesy of WCS.Pablo Escobar’s growing hippo legacyRapidly reproducing hippos may be the most enduring legacy the most famous narcotrafficker of all, Pablo Escobar, left to Colombia. While a juvenile hippo was recently transported to a zoo near Bogotá, some 50 to 70 hippos from Escobar’s former personal zoo continue to wander freely without predators or state control in the streams and lakes near the Madgalena River to the west.The hippopotamus is the world’s third-largest land animal. This invasive species has no predators in Colombia. Image courtesy of the Santa Cruz Zoological Foundation.Threats and promises in Central America’s last Scarlet Macaw corridorHabitat loss; theft of eggs and chicks; local suppliers, high-level clients, and village guardians — all are key factors in the survival of the last scarlet macaw corridor in Central America. Once spanning Belize, Guatemala and Mexico, the birds (Ara macao) now find refuge in only three protected areas. Locals robbing nests of eggs and chicks for traffickers are the biggest threat to their survival. Conservation projects that give the people incentives to protect the nests have the potential to restore sustainable scarlet macaw populations within 10 years, though.Scarlet macaws recovered by Guatemalan authorities from wildlife trafficking in November 2016. Image courtesy of CONAP.Bolivia ranks fourth in October Big DayBolivia ranked fourth in bird species spotted in the first annual October Global Big Day. The competition to count species of birds in a single day is normally held in May, the best time for bird watching in the northern hemisphere, but tropical countries requested an additional day in their best season. This month Bolivia listed a total of 854 species observed in a single day, ranking it fourth after Colombia, Brazil and Peru.Dozens of people went out to observe birds on October Big Day. Image by Kris Bartell.Black market fishing for hake out of control in ChileIn Chile’s debate about who is responsible for endangering hake populations, everyone points to poor governance for encouraging the black market. It is estimated that illegal hake fishing reaps up to $300 million a year. While a box of about 100 fish costs $60, the same box of illegally caught hake goes for $23 on the black market. More than 139 tons of hake, a staple of the country’s favorite traditional fish dish, were harvested in 2003; today the quota is set at 25,000 tons.Hake fishing. Image by Michelle Carrere.Read these stories in their entirety in Spanish at Mongabay Latam.center_img Article published by Maria Salazarlast_img read more

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Woman cycling 1,100 km to raise awareness of human trafficking

first_imgDominique Holley was raised by parents who were passionate about social justice issues.It was a passion that inspired the 29-year-old Toronto woman to also take action to help others.Holley arrived in Chatham Wednesday as part of her 1,100-kilometre bicycle tour – Be The One – Ride to End Human Trafficking – that follows the Highway 401 corridor from Windsor to Ottawa, where many of these crimes take place.Her journey began Tuesday in Windsor and ends in Ottawa on Oct. 31, with stops in 26 cities, including Sarnia on Wednesday and London on Thursday night. She will be taking part in a community discussion on human trafficking at the Locomotive Espresso cafe in London at 408 Pall Mall St. at 6 p.m. on Friday. No event was planned for Sarnia.“It’s more of a really casual community feeling, where I talk about why I’m doing it, what human trafficking looks like, and we just have a conversation about what everyone, in their own way, can do to fight human trafficking,” Holley said.She first learned about human trafficking when working on a Grade 11 project that focused on the issue in a more global sense.“I remember thinking, ‘If it was happening in Canada I’d do something about it,’” Holley said.When she learned four years ago that human trafficking was happening in Ontario, she began researching the issue and volunteering with organizations that help victims.“My primary goal is really to educate and draw awareness to human trafficking,” Holley said, rather than having her tour be a fundraiser.If people would like to donate, she suggests they contribute to an organization in their community that fights human trafficking.When talking with people about this issue, Holley said she usually hears “Oh, I didn’t realize it was happening in Ontario.’”She added many people believe human trafficking is a situation that involves someone being kidnapped and held against their will.While that does happen in a small percentage of cases, Holley said that’s not what human trafficking primarily looks like in Ontario.Citing the fact more than 90 per cent of the victims are female, she noted one common type of trafficker is called a “Romeo pimp,” who develops a romantic relationship with the victim.“There’s a lot of emotional and mental manipulation and so often the victims are very emotionally attached to their trafficker,” Holley said.She realizes people can be overwhelmed when hearing about this crime and feel they don’t know what they can do to help.“What I’m really passionate about – which is why it’s called Be The One – is everyone can take one step,” she said.Holley said this “one step” could include parents calling on their local high schools to provide education about human trafficking or nurses advocating for workplace training on the signs of victimhood.“If everybody used their voice and took one small step, it would create a tidal wave of change,” she said.More details about the tour can be found at www.betheone.love and on Facebook at [email protected]last_img read more

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Program on the rise: Stratford girls basketball looks to turn a good start into a great finish

first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterSTRATFORD — The Stratford girls basketball team’s 7-2 start to the season may be surprising to some but not to the Tigers.Stratford started the season 6-0 before suffering conference home losses to Auburndale and Wisconsin Rapids Assumption during the last two weeks.Second-year coach Tammie Christopherson has high hopes for the Tigers this season but knows there is still plenty of work to do.The Tigers cleared one hurdle toward becoming a top-tier team in the Marawood Conference South by beating Wausau Newman Catholic on the road on Dec. 10, but a 10-point loss to Auburndale and a turnover-plagued 57-30 defeat to Assumption on Monday have showed they are not quite there.“We’re a program that’s been building and rising,” Christopherson said. “I tell the girls we’re a good program. We want to be a great program. In order to be a great program, we have to beat these teams at the top of the Marawood. We’re sick and tired of being fourth or fifth, we want to climb out of that.“We’re heading in the right direction, but we’re not there yet. It’s a long season. I have all the confidence that we can figure this out and we can come back stronger the next time. The beauty of the Marawood is we get see these teams all over again.”Stratford has a roster filled with juniors and sophomores. The only senior is 5-foot-11 center Marissa Cepress.Juniors Macie Frueh and Tianna Hughes are each averaging 10 points a game, and Cepress, Savannah Schillinger, and Casey Kolbeck—the other three starters in the Tigers’ lineup—have also scored in double figures in at least one game this season.“We’re a small team, and that does hurt us sometimes,” Christopherson said. “We do get scoring from a lot of different places, and I think that is probably our biggest strength right now. We have to develop an inside game. We can’t rely solely on living and dying by the 3-point line. Slowly but surely we’re creeping into the inside game a little more.”The Tigers, 2-2 in the Marawood South, have games against Pittsville and Marathon coming up before beginning their second time through the conference slate. Christopherson said the team needs to continue to work hard and improve, especially in the mental part of the game.“We’re still young. My goal is that we keep getting better,” Christopherson said. “My first three people off the bench are sophomores. I see growth in them too. We have to keep building. This conference is absolutely insane. There’s no off night in the Marawood, but I guess I wouldn’t have it any other way.”Paul Lecker is publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com, a contributor to Hub City Times Sports. You can reach him by email at [email protected]last_img read more

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Soweto, 100, looks to the future

first_img13 October 2004Soweto celebrated 100 years of existence on 12 October 2004.It was on 12 October 1904 that Klipspruit – some 25 kilometres south of Johannesburg’s city centre – was formally set up as a labour reserve to keep black workers, who worked mostly in the burgeoning mining industry, away from white Johannesburg.Since the inception of its first township, Soweto has experienced phenomenal growth, mostly in ways that apartheid planners never anticipated, but it remains chiefly a working class neighbourhood.Soweto, heartbeat of the nationInfused with the history of the struggle against apartheid and alive with the energy of the city of gold, Soweto is a must-see for tourists in search of more than sun, sea and the big five.Over the past 100 years, Soweto has seen generations of migrants to the city lose their tribal innocence as they were swallowed up by its cosmopolitan appeal, for better or for worse. It has grown to become an international trademark of South Africa’s struggle against apartheid.Despite its rich history, its reputation as a hotbed of the struggle against apartheid, and its status as the most cosmopolitan township in the country, Soweto has remained economically underdeveloped – but that looks set to change.Although it is home to just under 40% of Johannesburg’s population, Soweto’s contribution to the city’s gross domestic product stands at a negligible four percent, says Li Pernegger, programme manager of area regeneration in the city’s economic development unit.Stimulating Soweto’s economyIn an effort to unlock the economic potential of the township, the City of Johannesburg has formulated and adopted the Greater Soweto Development Initiative (SDI), a plan to stimulate economic growth.The initiative is aimed at providing a foundation for integrated development in Greater Soweto, says Pernegger, adding that in the long term Greater Soweto will no longer be a purely residential area, but will be an “integrated urban area in which people live, work, invest and recreate”.Coordinated by Johannesburg’s economic development unit, the SDI will focus on economic sector support and business node development, the provision of appropriate infrastructure and services, planning, land use management and land release, social development, safety and security, and improving the natural environmentThe City also recently set up the Greater Soweto Development Committee (GSDC) with a brief to take Soweto out of its economic stagnation.The GSDC was set up as a Section 79 committee to make recommendations to council on developmental priorities. The committee is made up of 25 councillors from Region 6 and Region 10, which jointly comprise Soweto. The committee will be charged with “coordinating interested and affected parties and enlisting their support for the initiative”.A study commissioned by the economic development unit in 2003, analysing economic activity levels in Soweto, found that residents do not use their buying power for the benefit of the area. Pernegger says: “We realised that Sowetans actually have an enormous buying power, but 80% of that money is spent outside Soweto and little of the demand for goods is matched by retail supply within Soweto.”Pernegger puts the combined annual buying power of residents at over R10.5-billion, “with R4.3-billion of that available for consumer spending”.The City of Johannesburg, according to Pernegger, is working on measures “to ensure that more of the residents’ buying power is retained within Soweto by facilitating the establishment of appropriate, and sustainable, retail development at the correct locations within Soweto. We want to get retail development going so that we have more money circulating inside Soweto, and more jobs being created”.Pernegger is confident Soweto offers viable investment opportunities. “The private sector believes there are investment opportunities there, especially retail developers, and now the challenge is for other commercial developers to appreciate the huge potential for the provision of warehousing, factory and office space too.”The development of Soweto, says Pernegger, will require that the neighbourhoods that make up Soweto be branded individually. “The SDI will become an enabling tool to start creating identities for the different parts of Soweto,” she says.The initiative will also help identify priority areas. “We need to know more precisely where is it attractive and viable for developers to invest in the future.”Pernegger says the economic development unit is finalising a retail demand analysis and drawing up strategies for retail development. “The consultants have developed an analysis and model of retail demand and supply (current and projected to 2014), as per different catchments, and we have developed a fairly sophisticated understanding of the potential consumer base per area.”She adds: “Development strategies are being recommended and City priorities are being identified. The economic impact of the implementation of the proposed development strategies is also being considered.”Council has already agreed to apply to the Industrial Development Corporation for grant funding to back the design of economic sector support programmes “as well as capacity for the coordination of the SDI”, according to Pernegger.Such funding will help “get development going in the township. It will help us package bankable projects by managing some of the risks inherent in property development in the area”, says Pernegger, who is optimistic about the Industrial Development Corporation’s response.Source: City of Johannesburglast_img read more

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a month agoNewcastle boss Bruce feels Carroll can help Joelinton settle

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Newcastle boss Bruce feels Carroll can help Joelinton settleby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveNewcastle United boss Steve Bruce feels Andy Carroll can help Joelinton settle.Bruce was happy to have both on the pitch for their 1-1 draw with Brighton.He said, “On ‘Big Joe’, the burden of being a Newcastle United centre-forward is always going to be there and I think for any player who comes to the Premier League they need a bit of time, especially if you are young.”No disrespect to the Bundesliga or wherever they have come from, it is totally different to playing against three big centre-backs from Brighton who bashed him to bits.”It wasn’t until Andy Carroll came on where we could give him a bit of a hand but it was a bit of an eye-opener for him.”He learned from it, he is desperate to do well, so give them a bit of time and I think they will both flourish.” last_img read more

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Mandy Moore Joins Purina Cat Chow To Support CatFocused Shelters

first_imgMandy Moore has teamed up with the Purina Cat Chow “Building Better Lives” program to help increase cat adoptions.Every cat has a tale and for many, it starts at a shelter. All cats deserve a forever home where they can greet their owners at the door, bask in a sunbeam and nap on their favorite perch.Today, Purina Cat Chow announced that through its Purina Cat Chow “Building Better Lives” program the brand will donate $275,000 to 50 shelters nationwide – one in every state – in renovation and adoption support, product and monetary donations, as well as a possible $50,000 donation to The Petfinder Foundation, for a total contribution of up to $325,000.The Purina Cat Chow “Building Better Lives” program is committed to helping improve the lives of cats across the United States by providing high-quality, affordable nutrition; improving shelters; and finding more cats forever homes. This year, Purina Cat Chow will help support the participating 50 cat-focused shelters by:• Contributing up to $50,000 to The Petfinder Foundation if 1,500 cat adoption stories are shared; • Conducting three shelter renovations and cat adoption events at $50,000 apiece, totaling $150,000; and • Donating $2,500 in cash and Purina Cat Chow brand cat food per shelter, totaling $125,000.In two years, Purina Cat Chow will donate more than $500,000 to more than 100 local cat-focused shelters nationwide to help improve the lives of cats.Share Your Cat Rescue Story to Help Petfinder Shelters
Purina Cat Chow will donate up to $50,000 to The Petfinder Foundation if from now until Sept. 2, at least 1,500 stories are shared with the brand’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram) using the hashtag #myrescuestory. This donation will be used to support 50 Petfinder.com shelters to help support future cat adoption fees.“With millions of cats entering animal welfare organizations each year, we know there is a lot of work to do and we’re committed to supporting the shelters that care for these cats,” said Vincent Biroscak, Purina Cat Chow brand director. “We want rescue cats to have a great place to live and high-quality nutrition while they’re awaiting their forever homes and to provide the much-needed support to the dedicated animal welfare organizations that care for these cats.“In addition, we know there are millions of cat adoption stories that take place every year, and we’re excited to hear these heartwarming tales that owners share with us using #myrescuestory.”Mandy Moore, well-known actress and singer-songwriter who is also a passionate cat owner, teamed up with the Purina Cat Chow “Building Better Lives” program to help increase cat adoptions and encourage cat people nationwide to share their cat rescue stories to support the shelters that help cats every day. Moore shares her home with four rescue cats: Theo, Vincent, Maddie and Addison as well as two rescue dogs. She is a long-time supporter of animal rescue organizations.“I have four rescue cats and believe in the importance of supporting local animal welfare organizations,” said Moore. “Everyone who has ever adopted or rescued a cat can share how it has impacted their life. Rescue cats have a lot to offer their potential adopters, and I hope these stories encourage more people to consider adding a cat to their home.”Committed to Shelters, Adoptions and Nutrition 
Transforming shelters through renovations and adoption events: Purina Cat Chow will make over three shelters between July and August, 2014, valued at $50,000 each or $150,000 total.Renovations will include custom changes and upgrades, such as building free-roam cat rooms, painting and refreshing lobbies, to meet the specific needs for each facility. To celebrate the completion of each makeover, Purina Cat Chow will conduct a “Building Better Lives” adoption event at each shelter whereby the brand will help local cats find a new home during the event. Members of the Purina Cat Chow brand team will volunteer their time and talents during each renovation and adoption event.The renovation and adoption events are occurring at: • MaxFund Animal Adoption Center Denver, Co. July 11-12, 2014 • City of Rogers Animal Shelter Rogers, Ark. July 24, 2014 • Animal Humane Society Golden Valley, Minn. August 20, 2014Transforming Cats’ Lives through Nutrition and Resources
Purina Cat Chow will also support 50 shelters nationwide – one in every state – via cash and cat food donations. Each participating shelter will receive a donation valued at $2,500 – $2,000 in cash to support future cat adoptions and $500 worth of Purina Cat Chow brand cat food.Purina Cat Chow is dedicated to helping shelters feed cats high-quality food while awaiting forever homes. In addition to the cash donation to subsidize adoption fees, Purina Cat Chow will send each shelter Purina Cat Chow Complete Formula brand cat food to make sure each cat is fed high-quality, nutritious food.The Purina Cat Chow “Building Better Lives” program is building on the 2013 “50 Years. 50 Shelters.” program that touched the lives of more than 13,200 cats through four shelter renovations; delivered more than 12,000 pounds of Purina Cat Chow brand cat food and 8,000 cat care supply items; and gave a total of $75,000 in cash donations among 50 shelters.Source:PR Newswirelast_img read more

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