Georgia vs. Oklahoma State, 2009: The greatest title match that never was

first_imgThe greatest NCAA Championship that never was streamed live on the nascent NCAA.com, for a couple hundred diehard fans. This was 10 years ago, before primetime coverage and regional selection shows, before college golf became a TV spectacle that elevated the sport and made social-media stars of the game’s most tantalizing prospects. Texas A&M may be credited with the 2009 NCAA title, but a decade later, there’s a sense the championship was actually decided in the quarterfinals, in an instant classic between Georgia and Oklahoma State, two powerhouse programs that eventually graduated eight of those 10 starters to the PGA Tour. Their duel at Inverness remains one of college golf’s signature moments, a historic match witnessed by few but immortalized by the participants. That quarterfinal showdown, on May 29, 2009, featured a blockbuster anchor match between American amateur stars, ushered in the unpredictable match-play era and prompted a brief NCAA scheduling change – but it also left those who were there unsatisfied by the ending. “Having that match decided in the quarterfinals,” said one NCAA title-winning coach, “that’s the crime of the decade in college golf.” Why the perceived injustice? Because Oklahoma State and Georgia were – easily – the top two teams in the country that season. Entering nationals, the Cowboys’ roster boasted Rickie Fowler, Kevin Tway and Morgan Hoffmann and had led wire to wire across their last three tournaments, with five wins overall. The Bulldogs also came in streaking, with an entire starting lineup full of All-Americans (including Brian Harman, Russell Henley and Hudson Swafford) and five tournament titles. “We were always Nos. 1 and 2, going back and forth all year,” Fowler said. “We played a lot of similar tournaments. We were all good friends. We knew, even at the time, the quality of players on both sides.” Getty Images OSU teammates Rickie Fowler, Morgan Hoffman, Peter Uihlein at the ’09 Walker Cup (Getty) But the season-ending NCAAs that year promised a unique challenge. Hoping to inject some excitement into its national championship – with an eye on landing a future TV deal – the NCAA committee abandoned 72 holes of stroke play for a new format: a 54-hole stroke-play qualifier, leading into an eight-team, single-elimination match-play bracket to crown the national champion. “There were a lot of mumblings and grumblings,” Georgia coach Chris Haack said. “A lot of people would have rather just stuck with the four-round event, but I was for match play – I thought it’d create some excitement and it wouldn’t be so anticlimactic.” The movement was spearheaded by legendary former Oklahoma State coach Mike Holder, and – ironically – it likely cost the Cowboys a couple of NCAA titles, including in 2009. At Inverness, OSU played beautifully and won the stroke-play portion by 13 shots, with Fowler and Hoffmann both finishing inside the top 7 individually. All that performance guaranteed: that the Cowboys would be the No. 1 seed for match play. Georgia, meanwhile, coasted through qualifying. “I probably harped on it too much with our guys that, OK, we don’t have to win this thing – just finish somewhere in the top 8,” Haack said. “In hindsight, I should have said, ‘Let’s try and win this thing, and it’ll take care of itself.’” Instead, the Bulldogs placed seventh, 19 strokes behind Oklahoma State. Then they received some unwelcome news in the scoring tent afterward: Hudson Swafford had been taking muscle relaxers to combat back spasms, and he apparently was so hazy that he signed for a final-round 75 instead of the 74 that he’d actually shot. Having to count the higher score, the mistake dropped the Bulldogs from the seventh to the eighth seed – meaning they’d have to face off against Oklahoma State, not Arizona State, in the quarterfinals. “I wasn’t real happy that the rules official didn’t catch it, and I wasn’t real thrilled with Hudson, either,” Haack said. “But we figured that we’re going to have to play those boys at some point, either now or in the finals, so let’s go ahead and play them.” In no other sport can the top two teams play in any round other than the finals, but the NCAA committee treats the stroke-play portion as a qualifier and does not re-seed based on national ranking. And so it was No. 1 Oklahoma State vs. No. 2 Georgia – in the quarterfinals. UGA athletics UGA teammates Hudson Swafford, Harris English and Russell Henley (UGA athletics) “You’d rather have 1 and 2 playing in the final match than the first match, but it’s not set up for that to happen,” said Mike McGraw, who coached Oklahoma State from 2006-13. “But it was fine. My guys were competitive. They liked seeing that. We felt confident we could beat them if we played well.” At the time, the match-play pairings were based on rankings – the team’s No. 1 faced off against the opponent’s No. 1, etc. – which led to some juicy subplots, none more intriguing than Fowler vs. Harman: The long-haired darling of American amateur golf against the cocky country boy whose diminutive stature belied his inner rage. “I wanted to beat him just as bad as he wanted to beat me,” Harman said. “I didn’t need any extra juice for that one.” In the best-of-5 match-play format, Georgia’s Adam Mitchell earned the first point, cruising to a 5-and-3 victory over Tway, despite being assessed a penalty for having too many clubs in his bag. Oklahoma State’s Peter Uihlein and Hoffmann both claimed 4-and-3 victories, while Georgia’s Henley knotted up the match at two points apiece with a 2-up win. Fowler took control of the anchor match early and held a narrow advantage as they played Inverness’ back nine. “Each guy was hitting shot after shot as good as could be on a major-caliber course,” McGraw said. “Both of the guys are slightly built, but they’re titanic competitors. There was no doubt in your mind that these two guys were going to play the PGA Tour.” The match flipped on the 15th green, where Harman sank an 8-foot par putt to remain 1 down. When he plucked the ball out of the cup, Harman realized that both Fowler and McGraw had already bolted for the next tee, leaving him to fetch the flagstick on the far side of the green. Harman fumed. “He jammed the flag in the hole,” Haack recalled, “and said, ‘This really pisses me off.’” Even now, Harman was hesitant to discuss the incident on 15, saying that Fowler was one of his peers on Tour and that he didn’t want to “throw those guys under the bus.” “I know what happened,” he said. “Obviously I drew some inspiration from it. But it was just a moment in time, that’s all. It was a long time ago.” Oklahoma State athletics OSU’s Rickie Fowler during the 2009 NCAA season (OSU athletics) McGraw wasn’t made aware of the kerfuffle until recently. Fowler didn’t even recall leaving the flag and said that it must have been an innocent “brain fart.” “I’ve never been one to do gamesmanship or that type of thing,” Fowler said. “That’s not how I’d want to win. It’s my bad, but it was never my intention.” Then he added, with a smirk: “I guess it worked out in his favor.” Harman’s teammates knew immediately that the slight would ignite their senior leader. “If you’re playing against him, you don’t have to give him any more fuel, because he’s already got it,” Harris English said. “He’s a tough guy. He wants to beat you and kick you when you’re down. There’s no give-up. Harman already thought that everybody didn’t give him a chance to win that match, and when Rickie did that, there was no way he was going down – he put it in sixth gear.” The quality of golf over the next hour was extraordinary: Both players birdied the 16th hole from outside 15 feet. On 17, Harman drained a short birdie putt while Fowler’s try hit the lip and spun out. They were all square, heading to 18. On the home hole, Harman hammered a drive down the center but faced a difficult approach into Inverness’ 18th green, with the pin tucked on the back-right shelf. Any shot long was almost a certain bogey, so Fowler went first and played cautiously, leaving his ball below the slope, about 30 feet away. Harman seized the opportunity, spinning his ball back within 4 feet of the cup.  When he drained the putt – his third birdie in a row – to close out the match, Harman pumped his fist and unleashed a primal scream. Teammates poured onto the green to celebrate a victory that felt bigger than just a berth in the semifinals. UGA athletics UGA’s Brian Harman after defeating OSU’s Rickie Fowler (UGA athletics) “I still get goosebumps,” Swafford said, raising his forearm. “That was the national championship – that was the match. That’s how we felt. That was it for the year.” Donnie Wagner, the NCAA’s associate director of championships, spied Haack off the 18th green. With a wide grin, Wagner woofed, “I think we’ve got something here! Match play is here to stay.” The loss crushed Oklahoma State, but especially Fowler. Knowing that it was his final NCAA appearance – he’d turn pro later that fall, after the Walker Cup – he broke down in the locker room. When he eventually emerged after the NCAA-mandated 10-minute cool-off period, he heaped praise on his opponent. “To let that match slide … it sucked,” Fowler said now, a decade later. “It’s a little bit different when you’re playing for your team and your coaches and your school. There’s a lot more pressure and emotion.” McGraw spoke optimistically in the clubhouse afterward, about how that glitzy group would have more title chances, but the 2009 NCAAs marked the beginning of a star-crossed relationship with the new championship format. For the next few years OSU would once again field the top-ranked team, only to come up short in 2010 and ’11. “It was a pretty raw feeling,” McGraw said. Though Oklahoma State had an entire offseason to process the stunning result, Georgia was granted only about an hour. At the 2009 NCAAs, the quarterfinals and semifinals were contested on the same day, so the Bulldogs had little time to regroup and prepare for Arkansas, their semifinal opponent. “I remember thinking, Man, I can’t believe we’ve got to go back out after this!” Harman said. The Bulldogs spent that precious time in the locker room, eating lunch and regaling each other with tales of their quarterfinal glory. Haack said he and English were still discussing the win during the first few holes of the afternoon semifinals. “We weren’t even thinking about the next match, and that’s partly my fault – I should have gotten those guys regrouped,” Haack said. “We just weren’t ready to play. It was just way too much of an emotional victory to play again.” Arkansas was no slouch – the Razorbacks were led by future PGA Tour winners David Lingmerth and Andrew Landry – but a gassed Georgia team also didn’t mount much of a challenge, falling, 3-1-1, and leaving Inverness with mixed emotions. Getty Images The official 2009 NCAA mens’ national champs, Texas A&M (Getty) “We were on such a high that it was hard to play after that,” English said. “It’s like playing back-to-back games during March Madness. Not that Arkansas was a letdown match, but we didn’t give it as much attention as we should have.” The NCAA, at least initially, seemed determined to avoid that buzzkill again. For the next four years, the match-play portion of the championship was spaced out over three days, to give advancing teams more time to recover. (They’ve used the condensed match-play format since 2014, after stroke play was expanded from 54 to 72 holes.) Re-seeding also remains a thorny issue for some – the Nos. 1-vs.-2 quarterfinal happened again last year, in fact – though most coaches seem indifferent. “If you’re going to win it all,” said Texas A&M coach J.T. Higgins, “you’d probably have to beat that No. 1 team, anyway, right?” Just as the NCAA’s Wagner predicted on the 18th green, the switch to match play has been a monster success for college golf – a tournament full of dramatic moments and clutch shots, even if the format introduces more volatility. “I hurt for all of those guys, because we’d had a really epic and successful season,” McGraw said. “Most people want to tell you that it wasn’t a success because you got beat, but it hasn’t been a failure. I don’t think less of myself, or my life hasn’t been diminished because we lost that championship. They’re all just small lessons in perspective.” Not even revisionist history can strip Texas A&M of its NCAA title, of course, but Haack has long held a different perspective on the final outcome that week. “We won what was inevitably going to be the final match,” he said, “and so to this day, in my own head, I think of that as my third national championship.”last_img read more

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Ship Finance International Sells Two VLCCs

first_imgShip Finance International Limited, today announced that it has agreed to sell the 1998 and 1999 built VLCCs Front Champion and Golden Victory to unrelated third parties. The Company has simultaneously agreed to terminate the corresponding charter parties with a subsidiary of Frontline Ltd.The vessels are expected to be delivered to the new owners in November 2013 and Ship Finance expects to receive cash proceeds of approximately $43 million, including approximately $11 million upfront payment from Frontline. In addition, we will receive approximately $79 million in 7.5% amortizing notes from Frontline.The amortization profile and maturity of the notes will match the current charters for the two vessels, with reduced rates until 2015 and full rates from 2016. Front Champion and Golden Victory were acquired in 2005 with the highest charter rates across the vessels on charter to Frontline, and the level of compensation payments for early termination is a reflection of this.While the spot VLCC market has currently shown some signs of recovery, there is still a fundamental oversupply in the market, and the retirement of older vessels will contribute to a balancing of the market going forward. The decision to phase out Front Champion and Golden Victory has been made on the basis of individual assessments of the vessels and the costs of taking them through expensive drydockings later this year.Divesting of older vessels is a part of the Company’s strategy to renew and diversify the fleet. The majority of our charter revenues are currently sourced from the offshore segment, and in the second quarter of 2013, the adjusted EBITDA from the vessels on charter to Frontline was limited to only 18% of the total. Following this sale, the number of vessels on charter to Frontline will be reduced to 20 vessels, including 15 VLCCs and five Suezmax crude oil carriers.SFL, November 7, 2013last_img read more

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Nepali scientists deploy drones to count endangered crocodiles

first_imgArticle published by Sue Palminteri cameras, Critically Endangered Species, Drones, Freshwater Animals, Freshwater Ecosystems, Monitoring, Reptiles, Sensors, Surveying, Technology, UAV, Wildtech Researchers in Nepal used drone images to survey critically endangered gharial crocodiles along the banks of the Babai River, comparing their results to those of multi-team ground surveys.Analysis of the drone images produced counts of gharials and mugger crocodiles similar to those of ground survey teams, in less time and at a lower cost.The researchers stressed the importance of conducting aerial surveys when environmental conditions are most conducive, such as during the winter months when water clarity in the Babai River enables counts of gharials just under the water’s surface. The survey looked easy on paper. All they had to do was to go the Babai Valley in western Nepal and fly a drone (or unmanned aerial vehicle, UAV) along a river. But wildlife researchers Gokarna Jung Thapa, Eric Wikramanayake and Suraj Karkie soon realized that their work was fraught with elephantine challenges.“Our mission was to fly a drone over the Babai and take photos of gharials (Gavialis gangeticus) basking on the banks of the river,” said Thapa, who along with his team visited the valley in January last year. The wild elephants did not like the idea.“Our vehicle was chased by a herd of wild elephants,” he told Mongabay. “We had to speed uphill and request a truck-load of soldiers to rescue us that day.” Despite the rescue call, the resources Thapa and his team members used on their mission to count gharials were minimal compared to similar missions in the past.A pair of gharial crocodiles resting on the bank of the Babai River in western Nepal. Image courtesy of Gokarna Jung Thapa/WWF-Nepal.“In the past, enumerators, in around five groups of five, would walk long distances on the banks of the Babai to count this critically endangered species,” Thapa recalled. “We had to pay for not only their training, but also for their travel and accommodation. But now, we have shown that a three-member member team can carry out the field work with the help of a drone.”It all began in early 2017 when Thapa, who works for WWF-Nepal, was looking for ways to put to use an FPV Raptor drone procured by his office. The drone was initially bought to assist army units patrolling the national parks. However, due to frequent change in personnel and lack of adequate training, the drone was not being put to optimum use. “That was when I came up with the idea to count gharials using the drone,” Thapa said.There were three reasons why Thapa and his colleagues selected the species. “First, the gharials are critically endangered—they are limited to Nepal and India and less than 200 breeding adults survive in the wild mainly due to rampant fishing, changes in river flow and increase in poaching,” Thapa said. “Second, they are sedentary and like to bask in the sun.”The drone did not bother these gharials basking on the rocky banks of a narrow section of the Babai River in Nepal. Image courtesy of Gokarna Jung Thapa/WWF-Nepal.The third reason they liked the idea of a drone survey was because gharials form long lines along the banks of the river. This forced enumerators in earlier counts to cover long distances, but if they went too close, the animals would retreat into the water.The researchers knew they could not just walk in with their drone any time of the year. Researcher Kanchan Thapa, a co-author of the paper, says that for a species like the fresh water gharials, winter (January and February) is the best time to conduct aerial surveys. “This is the time when the water in the river is less turbid and gharials swimming above or below around 1 meter from the surface of the water can also be counted,” said Kanchan Thapa. “We chose mornings (0800–1100) and evenings (1500–1700) to capture the photographs, as these are the basking times for crocodiles,” he explained.The researchers flew the drone at a speed of 10–12 meters (33–39 feet) per second, along 12 pre-designed missions for 2.72 hours of flight time covering a total of 102 kilometers (63 miles) of river bank habitat along the Babai, which flows through the Bardia National Park. The camera on board the drone, took 11,799 photographs covering an effective surface area of 8.2 square kilometers (3.2 square miles) of the river bank.Location of Bardia National Park in western Nepal, together with the drone flight plan. Image courtesy of G.J. Thapa (2018) Counting crocodiles from the sky: monitoring the critically endangered gharial (Gavialis gangeticus) population with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Journal of Unmanned Vehicle Systems.“With drones flying at an altitude of 80m [262 ft], the gharials didn’t even notice that they were being photographed,” Gokarna Jung Thapa said.The trio could get so engrossed in the aerial survey that they often lost track of what was going on in their surroundings. “When we carry out gharial counts, we generally have groups of enumerators working together,” Gokarna Jung Thapa said. “When animals see a group of people, they try to stay away. But when they see only a few people, they don’t hesitate to attack.”This was one of the main challenges of the fieldwork. However, the area they were surveying lies inside a valley, so they could not fly the drone from a higher altitude, where there is less risk of wild animals.“If we flew the drone from a higher altitude, there was risk that it would get entangled in the bushes and we would also lose sight of it,” Gokarna Jung Thapa said. “The telemetry range of the drone is also limited.”“The other problem we faced was when landing the UAV,” he added. “We found out that it is ideal to land the drone on grass, but there were times when we had to land it on sand, and it took a toll on its wings. We also found out that fixed-wing UAV’s like the ones we used were suitable for longer missions like ours, and the quad copters were more suitable for shorter missions to observe a small number of animals.”Researcher Gokarna Jung Thapa leads a training session for security personnel to use UAV’s to monitor wild animals in Bardia National Park. For the gharial study, the fixed-wing drone carried a small camera and took nearly 12,000 images. Image courtesy of Gokarna Jung Thapa/WWF-Nepal.Once their fieldwork finished at the end of February, they began to analyze the images. This was the most difficult part of the whole endeavor, said Kanchan Thapa. Gokarna Jung Thapa and his team assembled the photographs and carefully searched for the presence of gharials and mugger crocodiles (Crocodylus palustris), a species that shares its habitat with gharials. They selected 7,708 photographs (66 percent) of the 11,799 for stitching.“The shape and length of the snout is a feature that can used to differentiate between gharials and muggers. Gharials have a long and slender snout, while muggers have a short snout,” said Gokarna Jung Thapa. “Because the whole idea of the endeavor was to verify already available census data, we focused only on gharials, as muggers have not been counted in the recent past.”As they flew the UAV at an altitude of 80m, the researchers could not only count the number of gharials and muggers, it could also distinguish between the sexes. “We could have also estimated the approximate age of each individual gharial, but that was beyond the scope of our project,” said Gokarna Jung Thapa.The images approved by the analysts were then screened using counting software (Dynamic Venture, Inc.). Three image analysts then separately searched for crocodilians in each of the stitched photographs. “Collectively, there was consensus with a total of 64 crocodiles counted (33 gharials and 31 muggers), irrespective of age groups, and they were found spatially distributed in clusters along the Babai river bank,” wrote the authors in their paper.Gharials spotted by the drone-mounted GoPro camera during a flight over the Babai River. The clearer winter-season water allowed researchers to count gharials both on the bank and just below the water’s surface. Image courtesy of Gokarna Jung Thapa/WWF-Nepal.“We compared the UAV-derived count data with data from three replications collected from conventional gharial surveys conducted in 2016. We also compared the gharial count data with data collected over multiple temporal surveys carried out in the winter season at different time frames employing visual encounter surveys,” said the authors. The figures were found to be similar.Gokarna Jung Thapa is content that the study has shown that UAVs can be used to count freshwater species such as gharials. Kanchan Thapa believes that the same methodology could be used to count and monitor the endangered greater one-horned rhinos and other species that move slowly in the wild.As seen from above: an image taken by a drone-borne GoPro camera of gharials in the water and on the sandy banks of the Babai River. Image courtesy of Gokarna Jung Thapa/WWF-Nepal.“Our objective was to show it could be done, and we achieved it,” Gokarna Jung Thapa said. “We are now in touch with companies working on AI to speed up image processing and are also looking for thermal cameras to make the count more accurate,” he added. “With UAV counts, regular and periodic monitoring of endangered species is possible, and this enables us to carry out conservation interventions with as little lag time as possible.”Gokarna Jung Thapa said he wants to conduct a similar count in Chitwan National Park in central Nepal. Before that, he hopes to figure out a way to keep the elephants at bay.CitationThapa, G. J., Thapa, K., Thapa, R., Jnawali, S. R., Wich, S. A., Poudyal, L. P., & Karki, S. (2018). Counting crocodiles from the sky: monitoring the critically endangered gharial (Gavialis gangeticus) population with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Journal of Unmanned Vehicle Systems, 6(2), 71-82.Banner image: Gharial by Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Washington County Helping Kick Off State’s Bicentennial Friday

first_imgOn Friday, the state of Indiana turns 199 years old and Washington County will be helping celebrate with activities on the Courthouse lawn beginning at 1p.The anniversary marks the day President James Madison signed an act admitting Indiana as the 19th state of the Union.This Bicentennial Flag will be flown at the Washington County Courthouse over the next year. This year, the date also marks the beginning of Indiana’s bicentennial festivities.Washington County Auditor Randall Bills is helping keep the local committee going after the death of John Fultz. “John was involved in a little bit of everything and he was spearheading this. He was in poor health but still had a passion for doing this,” said Bills, who has been working with a local committee to organize the event on Friday that will include the reading of a proclamation acknowledging Dec. 11 as Indiana Statehood Day and the official kickoff of the bicentennial.The flag of the bicentennial celebrations will be flown outside the courthouse throughout 2016.Indiana will have its own Statehood Day Celebration at noon Friday at theIndiana Statehouse.Aside from flags and proclamations, Washington County is planning its part in the statewide celebrations, sharing the history of its cities and towns, lauding local community events and participating in a 92-county torch relay.Of the programs planned by the state, the Bicentennial Legacy Events will do the most to help Washington County boost awareness of the activities and events that will take place here,Bills said.Events such as Goshen First Fridays, the Wakarusa Maple Syrup Festival and theElkhart County 4-H Fair will be promoted throughout the state, which Coyne said will highlight the county’s tourism offerings.The 92-county Torch Relay will start Sept. 9, and torchbearers will make their way through the state up until Oct. 14. Washington will host the torch on the 17th stop — the torch starts off in Corydon and winds through Southern Indiana and comes from Jackson County down 135 into Salem and then moves on into Floyd and Clark County.Bills said organizers are still looking for torchbearers to represent the county. Nominations from the public are being accepted through Dec. 31, and Bills said he encourages residents to nominate anyone who has demonstrated public service, excellence in their profession and acts of heroism or volunteer service.Youth/Education, Historical/Celebration, Conservation andNomination forms can be picked up at City Hall and filled out online at http://www.in.gov/ibc/torchrelay/last_img read more

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Free Webinar: Universal Design with Accessibility in Mind

first_imgIt’s been a while since I’ve promoted webinars from the the User Experience Professionals Association International (UXPA). If you didn’t know, I was an officer for our local Michigan chapter of UXPA for several years. And I didn’t want to miss sharing an upcoming webinar that combines two of my interests: accessibility and user experience. UXPA will host their free one-hour webinar, Universal Design with Accessibility in Mind on August 23, 2019. Universal Design with Accessibility in MindLed by Kara Zinkle and Simon Dermer of Essential Accessibility, the webinar will focus on the importance of universal design and how it can be used to design online experiences usable by everyone. In the webinar, you will learn:Accessibility terminology: Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), Section 508 (508), Americans with Disability Act (ADA)How to focus on the barrier and not the disabilityWhat is appropriate content etiquetteAbout various types of assistive technologyIn addition, Zinkle and Dermer will share info about the size of the disability market, trends, as well as the return on investment that accessible user experiences deliver. About UXPAAn international organization with over 2,400 members around the world, UXPA supports people who research, design, and evaluate the user experience of products and services.Members come from many backgrounds, sharing the same goals: creating products and services that meet the needs of the people using them. Local chapters offer invited speaker presentations, roundtables, professional development, networking, and other events focused on bringing UX professionals and students together.Registration InfoThe free webinar will be held on August 23, 2019 at noon Eastern Daylight Time using Zoom video conferencing. In a different time zone? Here’s a time zone converter to find out when the webinar will be held in your time zone.While the event is free, registration is required. I plan to attend the webinar, hope you’ll join me!Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…RelatedTwo Free Web Accessibility Webinars This WeekEvery week web designers and developers ask me for ways they can learn more about web accessibility. I ask myself the same question! And that’s one of the reasons I publish my weekly roundups every Friday: to share info and resources about web accessibility. Since last week was the Thanksgiving…In “Accessibility”Free Webinar: Inclusive Design vs. Universal Design vs. AccessibilityWhat’s the difference between inclusive design, universal design, and accessibility? And what do these terms share in common? Find out at the free live webinar on Tuesday, September 24, 2019 when Deque Systems hosts a virtual panel of of experts who will discuss the similarities and differences of the three…In “Accessibility”Webinar: Digital Accessibility Support – A Guide to Trustworthy Free Online ResourcesImagine you’re a web designer, developer, digital marketer, project manager, or educator ready to learn more about web accessibility. You’ve heard of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) from the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) at the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). But you’re overwhelmed by the amount of information available:…In “Accessibility”last_img read more

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a month agoNewcastle boss Bruce feels Carroll can help Joelinton settle

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Newcastle boss Bruce feels Carroll can help Joelinton settleby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveNewcastle United boss Steve Bruce feels Andy Carroll can help Joelinton settle.Bruce was happy to have both on the pitch for their 1-1 draw with Brighton.He said, “On ‘Big Joe’, the burden of being a Newcastle United centre-forward is always going to be there and I think for any player who comes to the Premier League they need a bit of time, especially if you are young.”No disrespect to the Bundesliga or wherever they have come from, it is totally different to playing against three big centre-backs from Brighton who bashed him to bits.”It wasn’t until Andy Carroll came on where we could give him a bit of a hand but it was a bit of an eye-opener for him.”He learned from it, he is desperate to do well, so give them a bit of time and I think they will both flourish.” last_img read more

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In a breather for Air India OMCs not to stop ATF in

first_imgMumbai: In a big relief to cash-starved Air India, oil marketing companies Friday deferred a decision to suspend fuel supplies to the airline in Hyderabad and Raipur over non-payment of dues. Last month, Indian Oil-led OMCs had asked the national carrier to make a lump-sum payment towards outstanding dues, including interest, at the earliest or else face cut in fuel supplies at two more airports and from August 22, they stopped supplies to Air India in Pune, Vizag, Cochin, Patna, Ranchi and Mohali. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscal”The ban on fuel supply at these six airports continues. Supply at the rest of the airports remains normal,” Air India spokesperson said in a statement Friday. Though Air India has been on a cash-and-carry mode since April, and has been paying Rs 18 crore daily towards fuel bills, OMCs sought clearance of all dues at the earliest. The IOC provides 90-day credit to Air India without collaterals, but the dues have been mounting, and it must be over 240 days now. The airline’s total fuel bill dues stood at 4,600 crore as of end-March, which came down to Rs 4,300 crore as of end-July.last_img read more

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Terry Collins And Ned Yost Both Took Their Starters Out Too Late

World Series Game 3 was a tale of two hooks. Managers often get too much credit or blame for how their teams perform, but one of the most important decisions they can make is pulling the starting pitcher at just the right time. In Game 3, neither the Mets’ Terry Collins nor the Royals’ Ned Yost made the best decision, but one manager had his faith in his pitcher rewarded, and one suffered.Against a Royals lineup that doesn’t strike out, Mets starter Noah Syndergaard did as well as could be expected, fanning six batters. His four-seam fastball averaged 97.5 mph, higher even than the lofty baseline (97.1) he’d set in the regular season. From the first pitch of the game — which buzzed Royals leadoff hitter and magical totem Alcides Escobar — Syndergaard looked calm, purposeful, and in control.But in the top of the sixth, Syndergaard had retired 12 consecutive batters before giving up a single to Mike Moustakas and walking Salvador Perez (a rare feat) and Alex Gordon. Bases loaded, two out, Syndergaard had thrown 102 pitches — should Collins pull him? This season, Syndergaard allowed an unimpressive .860 OPS to opposing batters the third time through the order, and one lucky swing could have turned this game into a Royals win.Collins stuck with Syndergaard. It “worked” — the Royals’ Alex Rios grounded out to end the inning, and the Mets’ bullpen took care of the rest. After the game, Collins said, “I just thought that was a situation where, listen, we needed that third out and I thought he was the guy to do it.”The other guy who could’ve done it was Bartolo Colon. Colon, the savvy starter turned postseason reliever, gave up only a .698 OPS his first time through the order, much better than a tiring Syndergaard was likely to do. What’s more, that stat comes primarily from Colon’s experience as a starting pitcher, so he was likely to be even better in that situation coming from the bullpen.Meanwhile, Royals starter Yordano Ventura’s fastball wasn’t at its best, averaging 93.7 mph,1I’m using Pitchf/x data from MLB, scraped with John Choiniere’s script. almost three ticks lower than his average regular season velocity of 96.4. The loss of velocity showed; Ventura gave up seven hits in only 3 1/3rd innings of work and recorded only one strikeout.With the benefit of hindsight, it’s easy to see that pulling Ventura earlier would have been the right move. At the time, Yost may have reasoned that Ventura didn’t have much of a dropoff in the second time through the batting order, allowing a .661 OPS against opposing batters this year with a 2.5 strikeout-to-walk ratio. But Ventura was clearly having trouble, and the alternative was a Royals bullpen that was second-best in MLB at preventing runs. Even a relatively mediocre option from the pen like Luke Hochevar posted a better strikeout-to-walk ratio than Ventura in the second run through the order, and Yost could have drawn on him or converted starter Danny Duffy to throw a couple of innings each.Instead of pulling Ventura, Yost watched him give up a second homer, to Curtis Granderson in the third, before allowing three straight hits in the fourth inning. That’s three runs overall — and those three proved to be decisive, allowing the Mets to establish a lead they’d carry to the end of the game. Yost made a couple of other puzzling decisions, most obviously calling for Franklin Morales in the sixth. Morales, a back-of-the-bullpen player, gave up a few more runs and forced Yost to call for one of his vaunted relief aces (Kelvin Herrera).So we had two managers with similar decisions, but only one who suffered the consequences. That’s postseason baseball, where decisions are often judged in retrospect. Neither Collins nor Yost made the best choice in the moment, although Yost’s decision to stick with a starter whose stuff was measurably lacking is more egregious. Only Yost saw his starter fall apart, and the Royals lost a game as a result. read more

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Ohio State wrestling marching on without Logan Stieber

The Ohio State wrestling team eagerly anticipates the return of redshirt sophomore and team captain Logan Stieber as he works his way back from a leg muscle strain he suffered in early January. Stieber, who is undefeated with a 15-0 record, has been out for the past three matches, and his absence has been felt. The Buckeyes are 1-2 without him in the lineup. OSU coach Tom Ryan said Stieber’s presence has a great impact on how the team performs. “I think when you have a guy like Logan, I mean you have a great leader in there,” Ryan said. After all, Stieber is the defending 133-pound NCAA Champion. “You don’t know how guys are going to react without him in there until you see it, and I think he’s a spark. He’s a spark for the team and we need him back.” As important as Stieber is to the team, his fellow wrestlers aren’t using his absence as an excuse for their losing record during that time. Freshman Mark Martin, who wrestles at 165 pounds,said the team needs to increase its effort without, arguably, its top wrestler. “It basically forces us to step up. Everybody has to step up and make up for him being out, I guess. We all have to do our jobs and pick up our mentality,” Martin said. Because of the injury, which is being evaluated on a week-to-week basis, Stieber has had to tweak the way he leads the team with just his words instead of by example. “(It’s difficult) just being at practice and not being able to wrestle at matches,” he said. “I can always help by talking and getting everyone pumped up, but it’s very different if you’re out there wrestling. That’s the thing that sucks the most.” But the Buckeyes shouldn’t have to wait much longer to see the 2012 All-American and Big Ten Champion back on the mats. Stieber has been pleased with his progress since the injury and said he is set to return against Illinois on Feb. 1. “It’s going good, but we don’t want to rush back into anything,” he said. “I just have to take my time and have a great rehab.” In the meantime, several Buckeyes have the opportunity to fill the hole left by Stieber’s absence. Redshirt freshman Kyle Visconti, who typically wrestles at 125 pounds, has been wrestling in place of Stieber in the 133-pound weight class, going 1-2 in that time span. However, the Buckeyes could be going with a different 133-pounder this Friday away against Indiana, with redshirt sophomore Drew Stone, who also is listed at 125 pounds. “There will be a wrestle-off this week between Visconti and Stone,” Ryan said. “Stone was out with an injury so we couldn’t have a wrestle-off before, and plus it was really last minute who we were going to put in there. So they’ll wrestle off if we don’t figure it out.” After Indiana, the Buckeyes are set to host Wisconsin on Jan. 20 at St. John Arena. read more

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Performance review Thad Matta outstanding for Ohio State mens basketball

OSU oach Thad Matta talks to his players during a timeout. OSU beat Minnesota, 64-46, Feb. 22 at the Schottenstein Center.Credit: Ritika Shah / Asst. photo editorOhio State men’s basketball coach Thad Matta received positive feedback in his most recent performance review with athletic director and recently promoted Vice President Gene Smith, but Smith wants Matta to be more involved with promoting the Buckeyes’ early non-conference games.In his most recent performance review dated Sept. 4, Smith used words like “outstanding” and “remarkable” to describe Matta’s performance last season, according to public records requested Feb. 4 by The Lantern and received Monday.In the overall comments portion of the review, Smith said Matta “continues to be one of the premier coaches in the country,” and called his leadership “outstanding.” However, Smith referenced the Buckeyes’ non-conference schedule in the “opportunities for improvement” section.“Needs to assist the department in promoting early non-conference games to strengthen interest and attendance,” Smith said.OSU coasted through its 13 non-conference contests this season, winning each game by at least 10 points except the 64-61 decision against Notre Dame Dec. 21.The weak non-conference slate could have hurt the Buckeyes in the long run, who later lost five of seven Big Ten games in January.As for last season, OSU finished 29-8, won the Big Ten Conference Tournament, earned a No. 2 seed in the NCAA Tournament and made it to the Elite Eight before bowing out to Wichita State, 70-66. Overall, the report indicated Smith was pleased with the job Matta and company did.“This past year was another remarkable performance competing in a 4th Sweet 16 in a row and advancing to the Elite 8,” Smith said in the review. “The team exceeded all public expectations.”Matta’s performance is broken down into eight subheads: Academic Success of Program, Competitive Success of Program, Commitment to Compliance, Student-Athlete Welfare, Leadership, Communication, Budget Management and Public Relations/Donor Relations.Each subhead has different categories to assess Matta’s performance, and all were marked as a “strength,” with the exception of Commitment to Compliance, Budget Management and Public Relations/Donor Relations. Matta “met performance standards” in those three areas, as noted in the report.None of the sections were marked as “opportunity for improvement.”The team’s overall GPA was 2.82, with four players — then-senior guard Alex Rogers, then-junior guard Aaron Craft, then-sophomore forward Sam Thompson and then-freshman guard Amedeo Della Valle — being named Scholar Athletes for finishing the school year with a GPA of 3.7 or above.Matta is in his 10th season at the helm of the men’s basketball program, notably being the only coach in the country to lead his team to four straight Sweet Sixteens. His record is 121-27 in those four years, with each team notching at least 28 wins each season. read more

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