Eskom deploys tech to boost revenue while reducing electricity theft

first_img Previous articleThe rise of renewable energy across AfricaNext articleSolar hybrid power plant moves ahead in Zambia Ashley TheronAshley Theron-Ord is based in Cape Town, South Africa at Clarion Events-Africa. She is the Senior Content Producer across media brands including ESI Africa, Smart Energy International, Power Engineering International and Mining Review Africa. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Low carbon, solar future could increase jobs in the future – SAPVIA Finance and Policy BRICS Meter. 123rf South African state-owned power utility Eskom is rolling out new smart meter technology to mitigate the soaring cases of electricity theft – a recorded R20 billion ($1.5 billion) loss per annum.Engineering News reported that Eskom anti-electricity-theft campaign manager Madeline Kazinga noted that the country was losing around R5.4 billion ($384 million) a year in non-technical revenue, while municipal loss was around R15.2 billion ($1 billion) a year.She said this while addressing a group of media at Eskom’s Research and Innovation Centre in Johannesburg on Tuesday.By deploying smart meters the utility can monitor and capture data reflecting consumption of electricity, which will be used to assist in revenue collection as well as pin point where suspect faults are occurring.Reducing electricity theft high on Eskom prioritiesEskom energy and revenue losses manager Dileep John told media that the key focus areas has been Sandton and Midrand, with a target range of 30,000 households to be installed with smart meters.[quote]John said that smart prepayment split metering solutions, comprising a meter and a customer interface unit, is also currently being rolled out in Soweto, Engineering news reported.John said: “The plan is to roll these units out over the next five years to cover Soweto, Midrand and Sandton.” Read more…Keeping abreast of advancementsKeeping abreast of smart meter technology advances, the Eskom research centre continues to test new equipment against existing technologies.Engineering News highlighted: “As smart meter technologies continue to evolve, the infrastructure which allows two-way communications between the central system and the meter may be linked to other in-house devices.“Eskom is also piloting the use of Remote Access Terminals(RATs) in a number of locations countrywide. The RATs enable Eskom technicians to remotely disconnect or reconnect power supply to any specific customer without physically going to the point of supply.”John  explained: “The RATs play an important role in ensuring the safety of our staff when they have to do disconnections in dangerous areas, because such operations can now be conducted from the safety of their office.“Once completed, the new programme, which uses visualisation technology, will enable technicians to compare electricity use among customers in any suburb or even in a townhouse complex to identify those whose use is unusually high.”“All these interventions will give Eskom an edge in its continued fight against electricity theft,” he said.center_img Generation AFD and Eskom commit to a competitive electricity sector Featured image: 123rf UNDP China, CCIEE launch report to facilitate low-carbon developmentlast_img read more

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Ottawa womens shelter praises tough domestic violence penalties under proposed Bill C75

first_imgTodd Lamirande APTN NewsAn Ottawa women’s shelter is applauding the Liberal government’s plan to toughen the laws around intimate partner violence.Last week, Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould introduced Bill C-75, which aims to modernize the criminal justice system, reduce court delays and crack down on domestic violence.Irene Compton, program manager at Minwaashin Lodge, says 100 per cent of the clients are survivors of intimate partner violence.“A lot of them are abused themselves and they haven’t had the chance to go on their healing journey,” said Compton, adding that men are almost always the perpetrators. “There’s not enough supports for them. Maybe they are disconnected from their culture for whatever reasons.”Under Bill C-75, an accused could be denied bail and kept behind bars until trial, especially if he or she has a history of abuse.The onus will be on the accused to prove he’s not a continuous threat to his victims.There will also be harsher penalties for choking a partner, which Compton says is one of the most prevalent forms of abuse.Compton says Bill C-75 is a good start, but that more work needs to be done to help men.“We need more men’s organizations,” she says. “We need a men’s lodge here in Ottawa.”last_img read more

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