Japan-US bilateral DFI co-financing agreement to bolster private sector

first_img Generation AFD and Eskom commit to a competitive electricity sector BRICS TAGSJICAOPICprivate sector investment Previous articleIRENA behind sector cross-pollination with decentralised energyNext articleBrazilian natural gas industry is promising, states report Ashley TheronAshley Theron-Ord is based in Cape Town, South Africa at Clarion Events-Africa. She is the Senior Content Producer across media brands including ESI Africa, Smart Energy International, Power Engineering International and Mining Review Africa. Finance and Policy RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UNDP China, CCIEE launch report to facilitate low-carbon development Low carbon, solar future could increase jobs in the future – SAPVIA Featured image: Stock The Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) has signed a memorandum of cooperation (MOC) with the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) for promoting mutual co-financing to the private sector in developing countries. The MOC was signed by OPIC executive vice president, David Bohigian, and JICA chief economist and chief representative of the JICA US office, Ryosuke Nakata.In a company statement, the Japanese firm noted that it signed the MOC in order to deepen its cooperation and partnership with OPIC, which has an extensive and long-term track record of private sector financing in developing countries. Read more: Rwanda obtains grant to expand power distribution facilitiesAdditionally, the agreement will help to appropriately meet the financing needs of developing countries through cooperation between Japan-US bilateral DFIs.Through the sharing of best practices for co-financing projects, discussions and other measures, the MOC aims to expand support for effective work by the private sector in project formation and the due diligence process in developing countries with a stronger partnership with OPIC.JICA will continue to proactively solve development challenges by meeting the demand for private sector finance in developing countries.last_img read more

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Colorado may end its unique ban on rain barrels

first_imgDENVER | Colorado’s only-in-the-nation ban on backyard rain barrels is getting a new look from state lawmakers.The state House gave preliminary approval Friday to a bill allowing homeowners to use up to two 55-gallon rain barrels. “This puts the water user in the mindframe of preservation,” said one of the bill’s sponsors, Rep. Jessie Danielson, D-Wheat Ridge.This Sears home rain barrel system, sold and used in Colorado, may be legal if a state law passes. Currently, it’s illegal to store rainwater anywhere in ColoradoColorado’s rain-barrel ban is little known and widely flouted, with rain barrels for sale at many home-gardening stores and commonly used by home gardeners. But the barrels technically violate Colorado water law, which says that people don’t own the water that runs on or through their property. They can use the water, but they can’t keep it.Sponsors of the rain-barrel bill say the barrels don’t violate water law as long as homeowners are required to use the water outdoors on their own property. Homeowners aren’t taking the water, just holding onto it for a short time.“Right now we’re making Coloradans criminals” for using the barrels, said another supporter, Rep. Lori Saine, R-Dacono.But the measure sparked a spirited opposition from other Republicans, who warned the change violates Colorado’s complicated water law.Colorado is a major supplier of water to the American Southwest, which relies on runoff from the Rocky Mountain snows. The slightest changes to water policy in Colorado can have major consequences downstream.“Everything is not always as simple as it seems,” warned Rep. Don Coram, R-Montrose.Coram held up a coffee mug belonging to Saine and asked whether he should be allowed to keep it just because he wants it.“You can never own the water,” Coram said. “It’s not your water; it belongs to the people of Colorado.”The bill faces one more formal vote before heading to the Senate.Colorado’s law banning rain barrels was amended in 2009 to allow rain-barrel use by people with their own wells, but the change didn’t apply to municipal water users.___Online:House Bill 1259: https://bit.ly/1I60dGxlast_img read more

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