Drewry Container Shipping Heading to a Better Tomorrow

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Pixabay (Pixabay License) The container shipping industry is facing an exceptionally high level of uncertainty amid numerous headwinds, according to shipping consultancy Drewry.The uncertainty ranges from the extra cost associated with IMO 2020 and how much carriers will recover from shippers, to the possibility of a trade recession and unknown future engagement by shipowners in large vessel building programmes.“The degree of uncertainty is probably the highest it has been in a decade,” said Simon Heaney, senior manager, container research at Drewry and editor of the Container Forecaster.Every region is expected to see container port handling growth in each and every year of the five-year forecast horizon of the Container Forecaster, albeit at a slightly slower pace than Drewry was previously anticipating. Moreover, supply growth is expected to be below that of demand through 2023, which will assist the industry’s ongoing effort to rebalance an over-supplied market.Drewry expects that the industry will be close to equilibrium by 2023 with its Global Supply-Demand index reaching a reading of 97.1.“Our analysis makes it very clear that it is essential that carriers increase their fuel recovery ratio, or else there will be serious consequences,” said Heaney.“What gives us confidence of a better tomorrow is that despite weaker supply-demand fundamentals, carriers last year managed to secure marginally higher rates, proving themselves capable of exerting a greater degree of pricing discipline. We expect IMO 2020 to raise the industry’s fuel bill by around 50% in 2020, which will certainly sharpen minds and serve to keep carriers on track.”Drewry expects strong resistance from BCOs to new BAF formula, but carriers could be more successful than in the past due to the wider market acceptance of burden sharing and the fact that lines started discussing mechanisms early with shippers, giving them time to iron out any teething pains.“Most shippers accept that they will have to pay more but they rightly expect any increase to be justified with a credible and trusted mechanism – in other words the ball is very much in the carriers’ court,” said Heaney.last_img read more

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Ottawa womens shelter praises tough domestic violence penalties under proposed Bill C75

first_imgTodd Lamirande APTN NewsAn Ottawa women’s shelter is applauding the Liberal government’s plan to toughen the laws around intimate partner violence.Last week, Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould introduced Bill C-75, which aims to modernize the criminal justice system, reduce court delays and crack down on domestic violence.Irene Compton, program manager at Minwaashin Lodge, says 100 per cent of the clients are survivors of intimate partner violence.“A lot of them are abused themselves and they haven’t had the chance to go on their healing journey,” said Compton, adding that men are almost always the perpetrators. “There’s not enough supports for them. Maybe they are disconnected from their culture for whatever reasons.”Under Bill C-75, an accused could be denied bail and kept behind bars until trial, especially if he or she has a history of abuse.The onus will be on the accused to prove he’s not a continuous threat to his victims.There will also be harsher penalties for choking a partner, which Compton says is one of the most prevalent forms of abuse.Compton says Bill C-75 is a good start, but that more work needs to be done to help men.“We need more men’s organizations,” she says. “We need a men’s lodge here in Ottawa.”last_img read more

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