Merck to cut 360 R&D jobs, close one facility, and expand elsewhere

first_img [email protected] About the Author Reprints Tags MerckR&D Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. The spokeswoman explained that the changes, which were first reported by the In The Pipeline blog, reflect a need to focus more resources on tapping products being developed elsewhere. And Merck also plans to conduct more R&D in the Boston and San Francisco life sciences hubs. Related: Sanofi layoffs expected as reorganization goes into effect PharmalotMerck to cut 360 R&D jobs, close one facility, and expand elsewhere Leave this field empty if you’re human: Please enter a valid email address. As the center of gravity shifts in the life sciences, Merck is reorganizing its R&D teams by closing one facility, eliminating about 360 jobs from three sites, and transferring other employees to a pair of new facilities that are slated to open on opposite sides of the country.A spokeswoman for the drug maker, which is headquartered in New Jersey, confirmed that the planned changes affect drug discovery, preclinical, and early development work. As a result, the company is closing a facility in North Wales, Pa., which screens compounds for potential drug development.At the same time, Merck is cutting jobs in Kenilworth and Rahway, N.J. The company is not providing specific breakdowns, but the spokeswoman said that all totaled, less than 10 percent of roughly 3,600 people in early-stage R&D work at these three locations will lose their jobs. Another way of looking at it is the jobs to be lost amount to roughly 3 percent of the 11,900 who work in R&D companywide.advertisement Ed Silverman These moves come as the biopharmaceutical industry increasingly congregates in the Boston area and, to a somewhat lesser extent, in San Francisco. The shift has been under way for several years, actually, as these two cities leverage a unique mix of universities, teaching hospitals, and venture capital.The pool of brainy talent that hatched numerous startup companies has snowballed and prompted a growing number of established drug makers to open or expand their own R&D facilities. Merck, for instance, opened its existing Boston facility in 2004.Merck has, actually, been cutting staff for years. In 2013, the drug maker disclosed plans to slash its 81,000 headcount 20 percent by last year. The move involved closing offices in New Jersey and discontinuing some late-stage drug development, all of which was designed to save about $2.5 billion annually. @Pharmalot By Ed Silverman July 12, 2016 Reprints Newsletters Sign up for Pharmalot Your daily update on the drug industry. For instance, Merck later this year expects to open new labs at its Cambridge, Mass., location, which will focus on emerging sciences, including the role of the microbiome in disease. The company also plans to open a new research site in the San Francisco Bay area to focus on cardiometabolic disease and oncology. An interim location is planned for early next year, the spokeswoman said.advertisement Privacy Policy Mel Evans/APlast_img read more

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Where did all the bare counties go? Four takeaways from Nevada’s fight to preserve coverage

first_img Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. GET STARTED Politics Where did all the bare counties go? Four takeaways from Nevada’s fight to preserve coverage Log In | Learn More Casey Ross [email protected] National Technology Correspondent Casey covers the use of artificial intelligence in medicine and its underlying questions of safety, fairness, and privacy. He is the co-author of the newsletter STAT Health Tech. Hyacinth Empinado/STATcenter_img What’s included? Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. About the Author Reprints @caseymross In June, Nevada suddenly found itself in quite a jam — 14 of its 17 counties had zero insurers offering plans on the Obamacare exchanges.Insurance officials in the state scrambled, wooing and cajoling insurers to return. Two weeks ago, those efforts paid off. Centene Corp., a Missouri-based insurer, agreed to provide coverage in all the bare counties. What is it? By Casey Ross Aug. 30, 2017 Reprints Tags insurancepolicystateslast_img read more

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Why I’m worried about prediabetes

first_img Prevention is keyThe good news is that diabetes-related health complications can be minimized — and even prevented — by adopting a healthy, well-balanced diet and participating in regular physical activity that maintains your blood glucose level in a normal or close-to-normal range.The landmark Diabetes Prevention Program demonstrated that losing a minimum of 7 percent body weight, coupled with 2 ½ hours of brisk walking or other similar type of physical activity a week, could reverse prediabetes or at least delay the onset of diabetes. The folks in that study received personalized counseling about their diet, physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors to achieve these weight loss and activity goals. Follow-up research confirmed that this type of personalized counseling was more cost-effective over the long haul than just dispensing medication to lower blood sugar without making these lifestyle changes. In other words, taking a pill isn’t going to cut it. What’s needed are positive changes in diet and lifestyle. Here’s the solution: The U.S. House and Senate have recently introduced the bipartisan Preventing Diabetes in Medicare Act. It would cover medical nutrition therapy counseling for Medicare recipients with prediabetes. If passed, the law would likely force private health insurance providers to also cover the cost of counseling for those with prediabetes.The damage of diabetesDiabetes is one of the top seven leading causes of death among Americans. That may be a bit of an underestimate, since having it confers a double whammy: individuals with diabetes are also at risk for heart disease, the No. 1 killer of Americans. In shopping terms, this is a BOGO sale — buy one, get one free — gone very, very wrong.advertisement About the Author Reprints Joan Salge Blake Privacy Policy Related: [email protected] First OpinionWhy I’m worried about prediabetes Related: ‘Type 3 diabetes’: New links emerge between poor glucose metabolism and Alzheimer’s disease Please enter a valid email address.center_img Here’s the science behind the disease: Your body depends on a particular type of sugar, glucose, that it extracts from the foods you eat or regenerates from starch stored in the liver. In fact, your brain, nervous system, and red blood cells depend heavily on glucose to function properly.Normally, the body relies on the hormone known as insulin to usher glucose out of the bloodstream and into cells. But when cells lose the ability to respond to insulin’s “open up for glucose” signal, or the production of insulin falters, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. Too much blood sugar is the hallmark of prediabetes and diabetes. Over time, a high level of blood glucose can damage:the nervous system, causing chronic pain, tingling, and the loss of feeling in the feet and lower legs.the eyes. Diabetes-related eye disease is the leading cause of impaired vision and blindness among adults.the kidneys, often leading to kidney failure and the need for dialysis.the heart and arteries. Diabetes is a significant risk factor for heart attack, stroke, peripheral artery disease, and other cardiovascular problems.People with prediabetes have higher-than-normal levels of blood sugar, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. Being overweight increases the risk of developing prediabetes, as do eating an unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. The hazard of prediabetes isn’t just that it might lead to diabetes. Individuals with it are also at a higher risk of developing heart disease and stroke, even if they don’t yet have full-fledged diabetes. Newsletters Sign up for First Opinion A weekly digest of our opinion column, with insight from industry experts. By Joan Salge Blake Nov. 16, 2017 Reprints @JoanSalgeBlake Nam Y. Huh/AP The Real World, Diabetes: As cameras roll at a Jamaican resort, desperate patients seek healing Leave this field empty if you’re human: The American Diabetes Association recommends that individuals with diabetes receive individualized medical nutrition therapy, preferably by a registered dietitian knowledgeable in this area, to help them clean up their diets and get off the couch. Luckily, this type of personalized nutrition counseling is covered by most health insurance plans. The association also supports the same approach, and insurance coverage, for those with prediabetes.While the Preventing Diabetes in Medicare Act is a no-brainer, it may not be passed without public support. Consider contacting your representatives in the House of Representatives and the Senate and telling them you support this bill. Americans could be a co-pay away from getting a handle on diabetes by taking care of prediabetes.Joan Salge Blake is a clinical associate professor in the nutrition program at Boston University. She has received funds from General Mills and Mars for conference travel and for providing an educational webinar for nutrition and fitness professionals. There’s an epidemic of prediabetes in the United States: 84 million Americans have this condition but most don’t know it. Prediabetes puts an individual on track for developing full-blown diabetes in five years. Although simple strategies can derail that train, one of them — nutrition counseling — is missing.I worry that without preventive efforts like counseling about nutrition and other lifestyle choices, many people will unnecessarily make the journey from prediabetes to diabetes. And that would be a shame.Here’s the issue: While most insurance plans cover nutrition counseling for people with diabetes, it isn’t covered for those with prediabetes. That flies in the face of research documenting that lifestyle counseling is an effective way to halt the steady progression of prediabetes to diabetes and reduce the long-term costs associated with treating the complications like heart attacks and limb amputations that diabetes inflicts.advertisement Tags Congressdiabetesnutritionlast_img read more

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What pharma’s watching as Congress tries to hammer out a tax bill

first_img About the Author Reprints Politics What is it? Jon Elswick/AP @damiangarde As congressional leaders prepare to lock themselves away and hammer out a final tax bill, one thing is clear: Big Pharma, like the rest of corporate America, is going to get a big break.But there are devilish details the drug industry will be tracking, including the fates of an oft-used tax credit and a long-promised provision that would make it cheaper for multinational companies to bring overseas cash back to the U.S. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. National Biotech Reporter Damian covers biotech, is a co-writer of The Readout newsletter, and a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. Log In | Learn More GET STARTEDcenter_img [email protected] Damian Garde What pharma’s watching as Congress tries to hammer out a tax bill Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED By Damian Garde Dec. 13, 2017 Reprints Tags biotechnologyCongressfinancepharmaceuticalspolicySTAT+White House STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What’s included?last_img read more

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Voters don’t like ‘Big Pharma.’ But they could soon elect a Senate that includes two pharma lobbyists and a CEO

first_img STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What’s included? What is it? Voters don’t like ‘Big Pharma.’ But they could soon elect a Senate that includes two pharma lobbyists and a CEO Log In | Learn More Tags Congressdrug pricinggovernment agenciespolicyWhite House WASHINGTON — In the past year alone, President Trump has bellyached about drug makers charging “rip-off” prices, numerous Democrats have accused the pharmaceutical industry of pure greed, and polls have shown that voters believe lowering the cost of prescription medicines should be among government’s top priorities.But if Republicans prevail in just two nailbiter races on Tuesday, the Senate’s ranks would suddenly include two former drug industry lobbyists and even a pharma CEO. About the Author Reprints [email protected] Politics center_img Republican senatorial candidate Bob Hugin Seth Wenig/AP Washington Correspondent Lev Facher covers the politics of health and life sciences. Lev Facher @levfacher Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. By Lev Facher Nov. 2, 2018 Reprintslast_img read more

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It’s old news that vaccines don’t cause autism. But a major new study aims to refute skeptics again

first_img @HelenBranswell About the Author Reprints A nurse prepares an injection of the MMR vaccine. GEOFF CADDICK/AFP/Getty Images As the FDA warns against ‘young blood,’ an ambitious Silicon Valley startup tests a cocktail for Alzheimer’s By Helen Branswell March 4, 2019 Reprints Privacy Policy Why redo the work? Because the misplaced concern hasn’t gone away, said Anders Hviid, one of the researchers involved in the study.advertisement Tags autismVaccines Senior Writer, Infectious Disease Helen covers issues broadly related to infectious diseases, including outbreaks, preparedness, research, and vaccine development. Related:center_img Please enter a valid email address. A massive new study from Denmark found no association between being vaccinated against measles, mumps, and rubella and developing autism.In science and public health circles, that issue has long since been considered settled, with multiple studies over many years discounting the findings of a small study published more than 20 years ago that has since been expunged from the medical literature.But the size of this study — involving 657,461 Danish children born between 1999 and 2010 — should, in theory, bolster the argument that doctors and public health professionals still find themselves forced to make in the face of entrenched and growing resistance to vaccination in some quarters.advertisement Leave this field empty if you’re human: He also wrote that evidence hasn’t won over the skeptics so far. “It has been said that we now live in a ‘fact-resistant’ world where data have limited persuasive value,” he said.But Hviid said the size of this study allowed his group to look at some additional claims that are made about MMR vaccine — for example that children considered “at risk” of developing autism might be more likely to be diagnosed with the condition if they receive the vaccine. That argument is sometimes made about children who have a sibling with autism.The Danish data, drawn from a national health registry, showed no increase in autism in this subset of children. Nor did it see an onset of autism symptoms clustered around the timing of the MMR vaccine receipt.“We found no support for the hypothesis of increased risk for autism after MMR vaccination in … Danish children; no support for the hypothesis of MMR vaccination triggering autism in susceptible subgroups characterized by environmental and familial risk factors; and no support for a clustering of autism cases in specific time periods after MMR vaccination,” Hviid and his co-authors wrote.Omer said the focus now needs to be on studies that make clear how best to persuade vaccine-hesitant parents that the vaccines are safe and in their children’s best interest. Progress is being made on figuring out how to effectively communicate with such parents, he said, noting they make up a larger group than the more vocal individuals who flatly reject vaccines.“It’s an active area of research. But there are a lot of promising techniques that are coming online,” Omer said. “The idea that vaccines cause autism is still going around. And the anti-vaxx movement, if anything, has perhaps only grown stronger over the last 15 years,” he told STAT. “The trend that we’re seeing is worrying.”Six measles outbreaks are currently ongoing in the United States, with 206 cases reported in January and February, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That two-month total is higher than the entire year’s tally for 2017.Measles outbreaks have also been reported in a number of other countries around the world. A French family with unvaccinated children recently brought the virus to Costa Rica. An outbreak in an Orthodox Jewish community in New York City was triggered by a case that contracted the virus in Israel. The World Health Organization’s European regional office reported there were more than 85,000 cases across the continent in 2018 and 72 measles deaths.Washington state has spent more than $1.2 million trying to contain an outbreak there that to date has seen 71 people become infected. State Health Secretary John Wiesman is appearing Tuesday before the Senate’s Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions to ask for more funding to help the country’s public health sector cope.Among the things he plans to ask for: a 22 percent increase in funding for the CDC and a national information campaign to explain the value of vaccines.The money is needed, he said, to ensure that “as the anti-vaccine movement has become so well organized, we are just really adequately prepared in getting out our message and to counter that.‘’But will another study discounting a link between the MMR vaccine and autism make a difference? Not everyone is so sure.In an editorial published with the study, Dr. Saad Omer of Emory University noted it’s important to think about opportunity costs when deciding to devote research time and money to further exploring such a well-mined issue, writing that “continuing to evaluate the MMR-autism hypothesis might come at the expense of not pursuing some of the more promising leads.”(In an interview, Omer said he didn’t object to this particular study, which used existing data as opposed to data that had to be newly collected.) Newsletters Sign up for Morning Rounds Your daily dose of news in health and medicine. HealthIt’s old news that vaccines don’t cause autism. But a major new study aims to refute skeptics again The work, published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine, was conducted by researchers at the Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen. Some of the same scientists published an earlier article on this topic in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2002, based on data from 537,303 Danish children born between 1991 and 1998. Helen Branswelllast_img read more

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Novartis gene therapy for fatal childhood disease delivers strong sales during fourth quarter

first_img Unlock this article — plus daily market-moving biopharma analysis — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Adam Feuerstein Novartis gene therapy for fatal childhood disease delivers strong sales during fourth quarter Log In | Learn More Zolgensma, the Novartis gene therapy for infants and the world’s most expensive medicine, continues to perform well commercially, bringing in $186 million during the fourth quarter, topping analyst expectations on Wednesday.Last June, Novartis secured U.S. approval for Zolgensma as a one-time treatment for spinal muscular atrophy, a rare and deadly neurological disease. It carries a record price tag of $2.1 million, or an annualized cost of $425,000 per year for five years. Ruby Wallau for STAT About the Author Reprints @adamfeuerstein What’s included? Senior Writer, Biotech Adam is STAT’s national biotech columnist, reporting on the intersection of biotech and Wall Street. He’s also a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. center_img By Adam Feuerstein Jan. 29, 2020 Reprints Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What is it? GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. [email protected] Business Tags pharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

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More pharma companies should make the move toward becoming environmentally sustainable

first_img About the Author Reprints GET STARTED By Giacomo Chiesi April 27, 2021 Reprints linkedin.com/in/giacomochiesi/ Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Opinions+ Log In | Learn More Adobe More pharma companies should make the move toward becoming environmentally sustainable center_img What’s included? What is it? Tags advocacybiotechnologypharmaceuticalsSTAT+ Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Giacomo Chiesi STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. The gradual global shift towards sustainability, with an increased focus on climate change and environmental impact, is an essential movement. I’m concerned that few companies in the pharmaceutical industry have made substantial efforts to join the drive to achieve social, economic, and environmental progress and prosperity.The development and production of drugs requires a significant amount of natural, human, and economic resources, representing myriad risks to the environment and the sustainability of the industry. But there are ways to mitigate these risks and turn that work into opportunities.last_img read more

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Two recovered turtles released back into Florida waters

first_imgAdvertisement AdvertisementTags: Miamiturtle Photos courtesy of Miami SeaquariumMIAMI, Fla. – Miami Seaquarium Rescue and Rehab team released two turtles back into Florida waters on Thursday, March 11. The turtle release happened at Bill Baggs State Park. Team officials said Buoyance and Yule successfully completed their rehabilitation at Miami Seaquarium.Yule, a sub adult male loggerhead, was rescued from Black Point Marina on Dec. 16, 2019. Miami Seaquarium said animal care staff discovered Yule had five fishing hooks lodged inside his body. Surveillance video shows masked suspects who police say opened fire outside Florida concert June 1, 2021 Advertisement AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Third victim dies after mass shooting at Florida club June 6, 2021center_img AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments 3 dead, including corrections officer, in Florida grad party shooting June 8, 2021 RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementThough he was able to pass four of the five on his own, one very large hook got stuck at his esophagus and required surgery to safely and successfully remove. Officials said Buoyance, a juvenile male green sea turtle, was rescued on Sept. 24, 2020 from North Bay Village. As his nickname indicates, he had significant buoyancy issues, putting him at serious risk in the wild. Miami Seaquarium care staff identified dietary issues as leading him to become impacted and causing the problem. The team said rather than surgery to clear the blockage, caretakers provided a great diet, allowing him to pass the blockage. Tesla slams into FDOT Road Rangers stopped for a crash on I-95 May 20, 2021last_img read more

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St. Matthew’s House anticipates growing need for food in summer months

Click here to donate.  RELATEDTOPICS Warehouse to help St. Matthew’s House better serve SWFL residents in need May 11, 2021 AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Where to get free food in SWFL April 26 – 29 April 26, 2021 Advertisement Where to get free food in SWFL this week June 15, 2021 AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments AdvertisementOrganizers say they would feed about 400 families a month before the pandemic. They are on track to feed over 15,000 families this March. The demand is not expected to stop anytime soon. Summer is when they need the most help. Kids go on summer vacation from school and parents need more help feeding their families. FORT MYERS, Fla.– According to the charity St. Matthew’s House, the need for food is growing every month.On Thursday, they held five food distribution events. That is the most they’ve ever had in a single day. St. Matthew’s House hopes more locations will make the lines shorter. Adding locations will also help people find a more convenient event, close to where they work or live.They say many people stop by on their lunch breaks and don’t have a lot of time to get the food.  Hungry? St. Matthew’s House is giving away food in SWFL today AdvertisementTags: St. Matthew’s House June 3, 2021 Advertisement read more

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