India’s Greenest and Cleanest Village Defies the Norm

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore Large crowds of visitors have been thronging to the village curious to find out why Mawlynnong has earned the reputation for being arguably the cleanest and greenest in India. The streets are cleaned several times each day, plastic is completely banned and all waste disposal is environmentally friendly. Spurring the cleanliness is local initiative from the residents, all of whom can read and write. Unlike many parts of India, each house has a toilet. (Continue reading w/photos at BBC) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Obama Girls Talk About Christmas – with First Lady and Bo (Video)

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreFirst Lady Michelle Obama, along with daughters Malia and Sasha, delivered some Christmas cheer along with Bo, the family dog, to children in a local hospital. Bo barked at Santa, while the three answered questions, like “What did you get the president for Christmas?” Watch the AP video below, or at Clip Syndicate.last_img

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The World’s Oldest Body-Building Grandma Shows Others How to be Healthy, Happy

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreShe started body-building at age 71 and begins every day with a ten-mile run.At 75, this Baltimore grandmother has made it her mission to teach others how to to be healthy, happy and prosperous.“Age is just a number,” Miss Ernie tells the class at her church. “Age is just a number,” they call back with enthusiasm. (WATCH the inspiring video at BBC News or from YouTube below)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img

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The League Of Extraordinary Women: 60 Influencers Are Changing The World for Girls

The previously untold story of how an unprecedented network of high-achieving women from the world’s largest companies, innovative startups, philanthropic organizations, government, and the arts combined forces to change the lives of girls and women everywhere.Eight years ago Maria Eitel, CEO of the Nike Foundation, began connecting a group of executives, philanthropists, entrepreneurs, artists, government officials, and academics to formulate groundbreaking initiatives investing in girls and women and creating economic benefits for all.(READ the story from Fast Company)

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Ancient Roman Concrete Reveals Secret to Cutting Carbon Emissions

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThe chemical secrets of a concrete Roman breakwater that has spent the last 2,000 years submerged in the Mediterranean Sea have been uncovered by an international team of researchers led by a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of California, Berkeley.Analysis of the samples pinpointed why the best Roman concrete was superior to most modern concrete in durability, why its manufacture was less environmentally damaging – and how these improvements could be adopted in the modern world.“It’s not that modern concrete isn’t good – it’s so good we use 19 billion tons of it a year,” says Paulo Monteiro of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. “The problem is that manufacturing Portland cement accounts for seven percent of the carbon dioxide that industry puts into the air.” Portland cement is the source of the “glue” that holds most modern concrete together. But making it releases carbon from burning fuel, needed to heat a mix of limestone and clays to 1,450 degrees Celsius (2,642 degrees Fahrenheit) – and from the heated limestone (calcium carbonate) itself. Monteiro’s team found that the Romans, by contrast, used much less lime and made it from limestone baked at 900˚ C (1,652˚ F) or lower, requiring far less fuel than Portland cement.Cutting greenhouse gas emissions is one powerful incentive for finding a better way to provide the concrete the world needs; another is the need for stronger, longer-lasting buildings, bridges, and other structures.“In the middle 20th century, concrete structures were designed to last 50 years, and a lot of them are on borrowed time,” Monteiro says. “Now we design buildings to last 100 to 120 years.” Yet Roman harbor installations have survived 2,000 years of chemical attack and wave action underwater.How the Romans did itThe Romans made concrete by mixing lime and volcanic rock. For underwater structures, lime and volcanic ash were mixed to form mortar, and this mortar and volcanic tuff were packed into wooden forms. The seawater instantly triggered a hot chemical reaction. The lime was hydrated – incorporating water molecules into its structure – and reacted with the ash to cement the whole mixture together.Descriptions of volcanic ash have survived from ancient times. First Vitruvius, an engineer for the Emperor Augustus, and later Pliny the Elder recorded that the best maritime concrete was made with ash from volcanic regions of the Gulf of Naples (Pliny died in the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius that buried Pompeii), especially from sites near today’s seaside town of Pozzuoli. Ash with similar mineral characteristics, called pozzolan, is found in many parts of the world.Using experimental facilities from UC Berkeley, Saudi Arabia and Germany, they found that Roman concrete from Pozzuoli differs from the modern kind in several essential ways. One is the kind of glue that binds the concrete’s components together, with the Roman mineral mix producing an exceptionally stable binder. The results revealed a mineral mix with potential applications for high-performance concretes, including the encapsulation of hazardous wastes.“For us, pozzolan is important for its practical applications,” says Monteiro. “It could replace 40 percent of the world’s demand for Portland cement. And there are sources of pozzolan all over the world. Saudi Arabia has mountains of it.”Stronger, longer-lasting modern concrete, made with less fuel and less release of carbon into the atmosphere, may be the legacy of a deeper understanding of how the Romans made their incomparable concrete.(Learn more: Lawrence Berkeley National Lab)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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UPS Driver Saves Emaciated Great Dane

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThis past January, UPS Driver Gavin Crowsley was making a delivery on his Indiana route when he spotted a large-breed, emaciated dog with no food, no water, no shelter, and tied to a short chain.“I could see every bone in his body,” said Crowsley. “He was just lying on the ground. I knew if that dog didn’t die from starvation, he was going to die from the weather. I just couldn’t leave him there.” Within hours after calling the Clay County Humane Society, they arrived on the scene and rescued the dying Great Dane, which they named Phoenix.The dog made a complete recovery and is now living with a loving family.Crowsley subsequently went on to raise money for other dogs in need of rescue through a Facebook Page called Phoenix Fighters.(Source: Life With Dogs TV)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Little Free Pantries Spread Goodies From Sidewalks, Let Neighbors Pay it Forward

first_imgRELATED: High School Kids Start Food Pantry to Keep Classmates From HungerThe Little Free Pantry project has been giving communities the chance to provide for local people living in poverty, by erecting small cabinets and filling them with food and school supplies, free for the taking.Even if your neighborhood is not suffering from impoverishment, the pantries can still be used as a method of sharing your surplus with those around you.Since its first unit was erected by Little Free Pantry founder Jessica McClard in 2016 in Fayetteville, Arkansas, dozens more have been constructed around America by people eager to spread the compassion.MORE: Judges Are Refusing to Jail People Who Can’t Pay Fines, Choosing Community Service InsteadIt’s such a great idea that it has spawned a spin-off organization known as the Blessing Box—run by a Christian church group and filling their own set of pantries in Ohio.“How I’d love to have it function is that it would not necessarily be a place for people who are really in need, but just for anyone,” Jessica told Shareable. “On the last day of school, I put some bubbles and jump ropes, and sidewalk chalk, and balloons in the pantry. I had to encourage the parents to send their kids there because they didn’t think it was for them.”MORE: Crochet Community Piles On the Yarn for Princess Wigs for Kids With CancerAnd while regular food kitchens have set hours of operation and requirements, the LFP’s accessibility makes it an easy 24/7 fix for anyone nearby.“I feel that the Pantry could potentially be for everyone. I took something out of it and took it home because I wanted to know what that felt like. It felt really good. It felt like community.”CHECK OUT: Woman Donates Entire Toy Store to Kids in Homeless SheltersIf you want to build your own LFP, you can Google “Little Free Library plans” to find different specifications, measurements, blueprints, and tips. Once you have your pantry at the ready, you can organize a group of friends, family, or church-goers to keep it stocked during the week.Check out the Little Food Pantry’s Facebook page and website to hear about new boxes being erected by generous folks around the world.Join In The Generosity, Click To Share With Your Friends on Social Media…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreIf you’re already a fan of the Little Free Libraries that provide free books to anyone passing by, then get ready for the Little Free Pantry – a project that is erecting tiny boxes stocked with goodies that leave no small impact on neighbors who don’t have enough to eat.last_img read more

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Watch Amusing Video of Two Cats Trying to Pass Each Other Atop a Narrow Doorframe

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreMost people have become familiar with the cat mantra, “If it fits, I sits.” But what about trying to fit on top of a narrow doorframe?Well, that’s exactly what these two Siamese cats were caught doing in the most recent feline video to charm the internet.LOOK: When Goats Get Themselves Stuck on Narrow Ledge of Bridge, Humans Come to Their RescueBoth of the acro-cats can be seen facing each other on top of a thin ledge in a woman’s household. As they both try and bypass each other in order to get to the other side of the frame, they can be seen jostling uncomfortably in the middle of their balancing act.Though some animals may have called it quits, the two felines eventually find a way to slip past each other in a sufficiently elegant – albeit amusing – fashion.As the video’s description so wisely states, “cats always find a way.”(WATCH the video below)Click To Share The Pawesome Clip With Your FriendsAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Anonymous Donors Pay Off Millions in Student Debt for 400 Low-Income College Graduates

first_imgCHECK OUT: Landlord Hands Over His Family’s Stimulus Check to His 13 Tenants So They Could Save on Rent“With student loans increasingly becoming a financial burden, SRA is grateful for the opportunity to facilitate relief to our hardworking alumni who have become highly productive members of the workforce nationwide,” said SRA CEO Elizabeth Devaney, who informed the grads of their relieved debts in a Zoom call this week.Kimberly Armstrong, who owed $300,000 in law school debts, is just one of the SRA students who has now been freed from the financial burden thanks to the generous donation. She told KPIX: “It’s a shock; it’s amazing; it’s a relief, though … Literally, it’s a weight lifted.”MORE: Billionaire Who Promised to Pay Off College Debt for Grads is Now Paying Off Their Parents’ School Debt TooDr. Zachary Tabb, who owed $160,000 in medical school debt, agreed with the sentiment.“It’s life changing. I’ve had debt … really my entire adult life. And so it’s just something that—everywhere you go—it follows you,” he told reporters. “It’s really a generational impact. To completely un-burden myself and all of them … has a real multiplicative effect … not only on [my fellow SRA scholars’] lives, but on the contributions they can make to society.”(WATCH the heartwarming coverage below — or our international viewers can watch the video on the CBS News website)Be Sure And Share This Inspiring Story Of Kindness With Your Friends On Social Media…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreMore than 400 California college graduates were left overwhelmed with joy and surprise earlier this week after they were told that anonymous donors had paid off their student debt.The unidentified benefactors paid off the debt by donating more than $8 million to Students Rising Above (SRA), a San Francisco-based nonprofit organization that helps send low-income, first-generation college students through college and provide them with personal guidance, mentoring, internships, and career guidance.Despite how 100% of SRA students are from low-to-moderate incomes and 62% are living below the federal poverty line, however, the average SRA grad finishes school with $8,000 in debt.last_img read more

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Indiana Supreme Court justices hear case at Law School

first_imgFive Indiana Supreme Court justices visited campus Monday to hear arguments for a case on their docket, swapping their regular location in Indianapolis for the Eck Hall of Law’s Patrick F. McCartan Courtroom. Kathryn Dolan, public information officer for the Indiana Supreme Court, said the justices typically hear cases in other parts of the state several times a year. “The Court traditionally goes on the road a couple times a year to here oral arguments in places other than Indianapolis,” Dolan said. “The goal behind it is to allow the press and public and students the opportunity to see the court at work.” The justices heard the arguments for Jerrme Damar Cartwright v. State of Indiana in which Cartwright was convicted of attempted battery with a deadly weapon, attempted aggravated battery and possession of a handgun by a felon. The Indiana Court of Appeals overturned his original conviction due to alleged unfair jury selection. The case was open to the public to sit in on the arguments and afterwards, students engaged in a question and answer session with Chief Justice Randall Shepard about the case and his work. “We do actually take special pleasure in the question and answer with students after the argument,” Shepard said. “There are often, as they were today, very good, very thoughtful questions about how we do our work. It gives us a chance to see people we wouldn’t normally see in Indianapolis.” Notre Dame Law School professor Lloyd Mayer recognized the Supreme Court for hearing oral arguments outside of Indianapolis and around the state. “We want to be a place to be an advantage to the court here in Indiana and also an education for the students and the greater public,” Mayer said. A 1998 Notre Dame Law School graduate, Matthew McGovern, is the defense attorney in the case. “I am trying to get the [Supreme] court to leave the remedy that the Court of Appeals issued intact,” McGovern said. McGovern said the repercussions of the case would not be felt until after the Supreme Court writes its opinion. “What it is [they want to do] we will find out when the opinion comes down,” he said. “They could really do anything. They could give me the same remedy that I got in the Court of Appeals, but clarify the opinion. They could make new law and give me what I’ve asked for, or they could give the state what they asked for.” Mayer said the chance to observe the case was an important moment outside the classroom for law students. “This makes it real for [the law students], because you do a classroom exercise, and in the back of your mind you’re always thinking, ‘Is this really how it works?’ and it feels artificial,” Mayer said. “But this is a chance to see a real argument, a real case. This case has freedom on the line.” Mayer said the fact that McGovern, Cartwright’s attorney, was a Notre Dame graduate was also very powerful. “He was a student here, and the students can say, ‘I could be that guy,’” Mayer said. “‘I could be interacting with the justices that way.’” First-year law student Elizabeth Charnowski said hearing the arguments, watching the proceedings and interacting with the justices was a phenomenal chance for a law student. “This was a great way to get exposure to the criminal law,” Charnowski said. “And it was great to hear such an important case argued in our own courtroom.”last_img read more

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