Saint Mary’s Hosts 42nd Annual Madrigal Dinners

first_imgSaint Mary’s traditional Christmas-themed madrigal dinners will transform the north lounge of Regina Hall into a medieval banquet hall for students and members of the community Dec. 5 to 7, director of special events Richard Baxter said. Now in its 42nd year, the weekend-long event provides an alternate mode of celebration and preparation during the Advent season, Baxter said.The Saint Mary’s Department of Music organizes and performs an array of Renaissance and madrigal-oriented music courtesy of the 21 members of the Saint Mary’s Women’s Choir and its director Nancy Menk, professor of music. Menk, who has conducted the madrigals for 31 years, said the dinners have changed over time in style but not in spirit.For the 40th anniversary of the madrigals two years ago, the  show’s script and song list changed, Menk said, though some traditional favorites remained.“Some of the music is really traditional, so we do it every year,” Menk said. “We always have a returning group of seniors every year, but we sort of have a basic group of repertoire.“I try to pick repertoire that is from the Renaissance or at least sounds like it’s from the Renaissance. I want all the pieces to be like Christmas, and there aren’t really a whole lot of madrigals that are about Christmas. We at least want to go with an image of earlier times.”The dinners attempt to recreate a medieval ball at Christmastime, complete with a toast and a real boar’s head, Baxter said.“They actually have a boar’s head that they parade around,” Baxter said. “They do it every year. They serve different courses. There are jugglers [and] depending on the weather, they juggle pins outside. There are dancers that perform medieval dance. By the end of the evening, hopefully [the audience] got a sense of what the evening’s about.”The dinners also feature a is a holiday feast that includes prime rib, roasted potatoes, glazed carrots, Waldorf salad, wassail and cheesecake with flaming cherries, Baxter said.Along with the food, Baxter said she believes the music makes the dinners special.“[The choir doesn’t] just stand and sing,” Baxter said. “They’ll move around the whole area. You won’t even recognize it when we finish it. It’s a big production. It’s far more focused and controlled. It’s not like being on the street, it’s more concentrated. It is like you’re time traveling.”Baxter said the madrigal dinners only work with the help of an entire team of people.“There are maybe probably 25 members of the choir and another 15 servers, so there’s probably 50 people back there making it work,” Baxter said. “We’re there making sure everything’s smooth.”Though preparing the same music every year may seem a little mundane, Menk said the constant change of students is what delights her most.“I love to watch them get excited about it,” Menk said. “By the time we do it, it’s fun. The atmosphere at the madrigal dinners is always so festive that it’s easy to see why so many continue to make this a part of their annual holiday celebrations.“At every performance, when I step into the hall and see the beautiful candlelit setting and the looks of anticipation on our patrons’ faces, I feel really proud of what we have offered to our community for 42 years.”Some of the event’s most popular features include the jugglers and the procession of the boar’s head, but everyone always enjoys something unique and different, Menk said.Since first taking over the production, Menk said she has readjusted and perfected the show for each year’s audiences.“Now we have a formula that works, we don’t even have a meeting beforehand,” she said. “The choreographer does her thing, and I do my own thing, and in the end it all comes together.”The madrigal dinners are Saint Mary’s way of reaching out to the community beyond campus during the Advent season, Menk said.“It’s sort of our gift to the community,” Menk said. “There are some companies in town that use it as their Christmas party. There’s people who come every year. I know a lot of our alumnae who were in it come back to see it. I think it’s worth the money.”“It’s the best way to really prepare yourself for Christmas,” Baxter said. “It slows you down. It puts you in the mind frame of others. It just helps you get away from all the awful noise you get [during the holidays].”Tags: christmas, Madrigal Dinner, nancy menk, Regina Hall, Renaissance, Richard Baxterlast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s club aims to foster interfaith understanding

first_imgThis semester, students at Saint Mary’s College will be able to join a new club called Better Together. The club is focused on promoting interfaith dialogue throughout campus.Sophomore Jackie Rojas, the secretary of Better Together, said the goal of this club is to demonstrate how people with different perspectives and religious traditions can work together to better the community as a whole. Rojas said the club will strive to make the campus community more welcoming for students who come from different religious traditions.“Before coming to Saint Mary’s, I really didn’t know a lot about other religious traditions or other worldviews and so I took a world religions and dialogue class that really opened my eyes to the need for having this interreligious dialogue,” Rojas said. “As a Hispanic student I know how it feels to feel underrepresented so I don’t want people of other backgrounds to feel that way.”The co-presidents, juniors Sophie McDevitt and Gabby Haff, interned for professor Anita Houck of the Religious Studies department last semester. As a result of this shared experience, McDevitt and Haff helped to organize an interfaith conference that inspired the creation of this new club. At the conference, an acronym was created based on the work of Better Together, Rojas said.“We have this acronym that we invented for the conference called BISC, which meanings ‘building an inter-religious student community’ and so we call ourselves ‘biscuits,’” she said.McDevitt explained that the interfaith conference helped inspire the framework for the new club.“After the conference we talked about what we wanted our next steps to be. How do we want to increase interfaith dialogue on campus,” she said.The next steps, McDevitt said, consisted of integrating aspects from the conference into a group of students who would meet regularly. Aspects of the club’s work in this regard include visiting different places of worship, holding panels with various religious leaders, and open discussion nights. “We are saying interfaith dialogue instead of inter-religious dialogue because we want people to realize that you don’t have to have any religious affiliation to come,” McDevitt said.Rojas said the club’s plans for this semester include exploring members’ own experiences and studying different faith communities in the South Bend area.“We want to have different events where we get together to talk about our own stories in interfaith and also visit different communities or temples or places of worship,” she said. “We also want to work with the women’s interfaith dialogue group in South Bend to work with the outside community and try to increase awareness for the importance of interfaith dialogue.”McDevitt extended an open invitation to anyone who might be interested in joining Better Together.“We do have some open positions on our board if anyone is interested in joining our new club,” she said.Tags: interfaith dialogue, religion, Saint Mary’s Collegelast_img read more

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Let’s Hear It for the Ballet Girls! 30 Young Dancers Join the West End Cast of Billy Elliot

first_img “We are all looking forward to welcoming our new Ballet Girls to the Victoria Palace Theatre,” Anna-Jane Casey, who plays Mrs. Wilkinson, said in a statement. “I am particularly looking forward to keeping them on their toes at each performance as they join Billy on stage in Mrs. Wilkinson’s unique and especially energetic ballet lessons—I know they will give us ‘the old razzle-dazzle’ in their fabulous pink tutus!” In addition to Casey, Billy Elliot stars Harrison Dowzell, Elliott Hanna, Redmand Rance and Ali Rasul alternating in the role of Billy, Deka Walmsley as Dad, Kevin Wathen as Tony, Ann Emery as Grandma and Howard Crossley as George. Not one, not two, but 30 young ballet dancers are joining the West End cast of Billy Elliot—that’s a lot of pointe shoes! The group of young dancers between the ages of 10 and 16 will alternate as Mrs. Wilkinson’s adorable pirouetting dance students in the hit production at London’s Victoria Palace Theatre. Based on the Oscar-nominated film of the same name, Billy Elliot tells the inspirational story of one boy’s dream to realize his ambitions against the odds. Set against the background of the historic mid-1980s miners’ strike, Billy pursues his passion for dance secretly in order to avoid the disapproval of his struggling family.center_img View Comments Beginning September 24, the ballet students will be played by Niamh Ashley, Niamh Bennett, Macy Dyason, Morgan Hartley, Lauren Henson, Lydia Kalian, Darcey Littlefield, Natasha Pye, Caitlin Rosendale and Sophie Smart; Samantha Allison, Holly-Marie Davenport, Holly Duke, Ella Forman, Summer Jones, Eliza Love, Kiara-Jaide Mandoza, Emily Miles, Georgia Prentice and Lily Sitzia; and Chorlene Biron-Monnier, Samantha Delaney, Sophie Green, Esa Halil, Taila Halil, Allanah Martin Judge, Ellie Munden, Ellis O’Neill, Charlotte Ross-Gower and Brooke Wolpert.last_img read more

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Vermont Public Service Department releases 2014 Telecommunications Plan

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The Department of Public Service, in conjunction with the Agency of Commerce and Community Development and the Department of Information and Innovation, has released the final 2014 Telecommunications Plan. The Plan addresses the major ongoing developments in the telecommunications industry, including broadband infrastructure development, regulatory policy (as the non-regulated aspects keep growing), greater competition and recommendations for future action.“This Plan is the product of a rigorous public input process. The Department carefully considered the proposals made by members of the public and the telecommunications industry in response to the Department’s final draft,” said Public Service Commissioner Christopher Recchia.The final plan includes added recommendations on “make-ready” and pole attachment policy, net neutrality, and it provides a more in depth look at the cost of deploying fiber to the home to every E911 location in Vermont. The Plan calls for a prioritization of State supported projects that ensure locations with the slowest available broadband speeds receive priority for upgrades.One of the challenges the state has is with oversight.”While demand for telecommunications services are greater than ever, the state’s authority to regulate the market has waned,” the report states.It goes on to say: “When the Telecommunications Act was signed into law in 1996, the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) and the Internet were nearly completely separate. Voice service over the PSTN was the only plausible definition of an “essential” service. This remained largely true at the publication of the Department’s 2004 Telecommunications Plan when competition in the telephone market was still establishing itself. But technological changes over the last 10 years have blurred the line between what is an essential service and what is not. One significant change is the use of packet switching to carry voice data in the same way that information data is transmitted.”The dominant packet switching technology, voice over Internet protocol (VoIP), has allowed a greater number of competitors to enter the voice market, such as cable and Internet content companies. Some companies provide voice service to fixed locations over internally managed Internet protocol (IP) networks, while other providers use IP technology to send voice traffic over the public Internet (nomadic VoIP). More importantly, VoIP has challenged the distinction between “telecommunications service” (or “basic service”) and an enhanced “information service.” Because federal law distinguishes between telecommunications and information services, and regulates each one differently, the rise of VoIP raises an important question about what is a telecommunications service. The transition from traditional circuit switched technology to IP technology is inevitable, and the roles that states and the national government play in this transition will be crucial to determining basic questions about quality, reach, and affordability of basic voice service in the future.”The voice telephony market has changed in other ways. Commercial Mobile Radio Service (cellular service) has become a dominate technology in the telecommunications industry over the past decade. The 2004 Telecommunications Plan survey indicated that an overwhelming majority of Vermont households (77%) had not even considered the idea of giving up their traditional landline service in favor of wireless service. Today, 29.9% of Vermont adults live in wireless-only households, and that number continues to increase as service expands and becomes more reliable.”Recent consolidation of the wireless market has resulted in four nationwide carriers offering service in Vermont. These carriers have made great inroads into rural Vermont, installing facilities in some of the hardest to reach places of the state. The result has been that Vermonters increasingly rely on their wireless devices to communicate.”Now, broadband service is nearly universal in Vermont, with availability in at 99% of locations within the state, with the remaining 1% having a “funded solution” in place.Figure 4 depicts the locations in each speed tier by county. 9% of locations (27,574) have or will have service available that meets the 2024 goal; 61% of locations (178,767) have service available that reaches 100 Mbps download and 10 Mbps upload, while this service does not meet the 2024 goal, it comes very close. At 8% of the locations (22,908), the best available service provides access at 4/1 Mbps; 22% of locations (65,816) have or will have high speed Internet access, but the best speeds are below 4/1 Mbps. This plan calls for prioritizing any state funded support by speed, starting with those locations that lack service of 4/1 Mbps or better. “The comments we received during the public and legislative review process helped us make this plan much stronger,” Recchia said, adding  “I appreciate the efforts of all those who commented and we made every effort to constructively address those comments in this final plan.”The Department held nine public hearings during the months of August and September, including one statutorily mandated hearing at the General Assembly. During this time, the Department received numerous comments suggesting Vermont adopt a revolving loan fund that would enable providers to receive loans with favorable terms to deploy broadband projects in hard to serve areas.“We carefully considered this proposal and decided a grant program will better serve hard to reach locations by making the business case for deploying infrastructure more favorable. A loan program would not likely enhance the business case for these areas.”In addition to broadband, the Plan also discusses ongoing developments in the provision of telephone and cable. In addition the Plan provides an analysis of state government telecommunications infrastructure. The Plan presents readers with an overview of the last ten years and what the State should focus on over the next ten years to ensure Vermonters have access to the best available telecommunications services. “It is our hope that this plan will help guide Vermont’s future telecommunications policy.”Source: Vermont Public Service Department. 12.4.2014. The 2014 Telecommunications Plan is available electronically at the following link: 2014 Telecommunications Plan(link is external). To receive a hard copy of the 2014 Telecommunications Plan, please contact Jim Porter at [email protected](link sends e-mail)  or (802) 828-4003.last_img read more

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Possible explosive found in Prairie Village house; bomb squad called for what could be World War II relic

first_imgThe device is placed in a containment unit that was backed into the driveway.A Prairie Village neighborhood was blocked off this afternoon after a family cleaning items out of the basement found what appeared to be a vintage munition, possibly a relic from World War II or earlier. The Overland Park Police Bomb Squad was called in and is on the scene.Register to continuelast_img

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St. Johns County Legal Aid celebrates pro bono work

first_imgSt. Johns County Legal Aid celebrates pro bono work February 1, 2014 Regular News MEGAN WALL OF ST. JOHNS COUNTY LEGAL AID, along with local judges, recently presented St. Johns County Legal Aid’s 2013 Pro Bono Awards. Each recipient performed upward of 100 hours of pro bono service, with some providing as many as 300 hours. Back row, from left, are Judge John Alexander, Tom Pycraft, Judge Howard Maltz, Michael Pelkowski, Judge Charles Tinlin, Judge Clyde Wolfe, Amanda Edwards, David Naples, Putnam Judge Scott Duponte, Adam Thoresen, attorney St. Johns Legal Aid, and Megan Wall, managing attorney of St. Johns Legal Aid. Front row, from left, are Rusty Collins, Jay Grife, Anne Marie Gennusa, Carol Daniels, Rebecca Lavie, and Tom Cushman.last_img read more

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Chelsfield MBO statement due this week

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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CIOB Consultancy Appointment: Appoint in Time

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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Interview: Emma & Jolie talk about debut single I Don’t Need a Man and their journey so far

first_imgEmma & Jolie are newcomers to the UK Country music scene and they release their debut single I Don’t Need a Man on Friday 10th July.The duo – Emma Walker and Jolie Harvey – met in 2015 at music college and officially came together as a duo just over a year ago. Since then Emma & Jolie have been working hard writing with the likes of Emily Hackett and Sammy Arriaga in Nashville.Ahead of the release of I Don’t Need a Man, I spoke to Emma & Jolie about the track, their journey so far and to find out what music has been getting them through the pandemic…Your debut single I Don’t Need a Man is coming out on Friday. Tell me about the song’s evolution from the acoustic version you played at Stagecouch to the single version people will hear this week…Emma: When we wrote the song we wanted it to be an anthem. We wanted it to be a really powerful song and upbeat. We went in with the idea that it was going to be a proper anthem. It developed from that. When we went into the studio, our producer knew the vibe we were going for and when we got the track it was perfect. It was exactly what we wanted. We made sure that everything that we did fit in with the idea that we wanted. We couldn’t be happier with the end result really.Jolie: Before we went in the studio we had a lot of reference tracks. We didn’t want to be a carbon copy but (they were songs we’d been) inspired by and he came up with what we have now.Credit: Jodie MorrisThe song is very current and it sounds like what’s coming out of Nashville right now but I like that you haven’t lost your Englishness. You’re not trying to sound American and your harmonies are so strong. How did you work on getting those so tight?Emma: To be honest, one of the things that we rate ourselves on is harmonies. When we first started singing it just came naturally and that’s how it started. As we’ve developed our harmonies have developed and it defines our sound. We work on our harmonies so they’re really super tight and in every song, we make sure that there’s a super tight harmony because it makes such a difference to the song. Our voices blend very well together but our voices are quite different so having the mix of the two really defines our sound.I’ve known about this single for a while now and it must have felt like a long wait for you to get it out there. How are you feeling about the release?Emma: It’s been a long time coming! We became a duo just over a year ago. We actually signed our management deal with Imogen and Emily (from Triple Fret Entertainment) one year ago yesterday. We knew that we wanted to release something as soon as we could, but we wanted to find the right song. We weren’t going to just release something for the sake of releasing it. We wanted to come in and be like, ‘right, this is our first track. It’s gonna be powerful. We want to make a proper name for ourselves that people are gonna remember this song as being like, a really amazing song’. Once we found that song, we wrote it in November when we were in Nashville with a girl called Emily Hackett. We came out of the session and we were so excited, we were like, ‘this is it!’ We sent it to Triple Fret and they agreed so from then on we just knew that was going to be what we were going to release. We wrote it in November and it’s July now. We’ve known the song for so long and we just want everyone to hear it. To finally know that everyone’s gonna hear what we’ve been like working on for so long is such a good feeling.Before even releasing a song you’ve picked up a lot of buzz, been to Nashville a few times and played Song Suffragettes. What has that been like?Emma: When we got the opportunity to do the Song Suffragettes we were like, ‘how has this happened? We’ve not even released anything!’ It was such a shock but we were so happy about it. Triple Fret have been so incredible. We couldn’t ask for two better people to be our managers. When we went into Song Suffragettes, I think we came out of it with more confidence because considering we’d not even been together for a year, to achieve things like that we were so happy and we were so proud of ourselves. That trip to Nashville really helped define us as artists and helped us find our sound.Jolie: The previous trip we went on was more like a holiday but the November one we were writing every single day. We had two writes a day. It was like a formal work trip. We had Song Suffragettes and we were networking with people. I think that’s helped us as well because being in Song Suffragettes, we’ve been able to make contacts. When people saw that we were going on Song Suffragettes we got taken a bit more seriously because we hadn’t released anything.Emma: When we went to Nashville, because of Triple Fret, we got in contact with so many people and we’ve been able to write with those people and get really strong songs from that. I feel like knowing these people who are doing really well in Nashville, they’ve recognised what we have and seen potential in us, which has helped gain that momentum. Triple Fret has been great with keeping our momentum in the UK even though obviously we’ve not released anything. They’ve been trying to get us on certain gigs and just trying to make sure that we have a name out there so that people don’t forget about us before we release anything.Credit: Jodie MorrisThere’s nothing like you in the UK Country scene right now so that must be exciting to be able to forge your own path?Emma: Yeah, definitely. We came in wanting to have a unique sound. We didn’t want to just fall into the background. We were very passionate about what we wanted and we knew what we wanted. That was really good for Triple Fret because they knew what we wanted and what we wanted to achieve and the path we wanted to go down. They were already on the same path and they knew they could help us with this. It is really lovely that you say that because we do think in some way that we have something original and special.The day after the single you are going to be performing as part of the virtual Dixie Fields, which is a big opportunity. How are you feeling about that?Emma: We actually went to Dixie Fields last year and we were like, ‘oh it would be amazing to do that next year’ and obviously now we’re doing it, it’s so good. The fact that we’ve not released much yet and we’ve had these opportunities, it’s just been amazing for us.What’s it like releasing your debut single in the middle of a pandemic?Emma: That has stressed us out a little bit. We’ve been trying to see the positives. We were on a write recently with Laura Oates and she raised the point that now is a really good time as people are on social media. A lot of people are at home and they’re on their phones and things like that. It’s a lot easier for people to stream and I think that in that sense, we’ve been trying to take in the positives of it, obviously. I think as well because we’re releasing it in the summer and it’s quite a summer song, even though there’s a pandemic, it’s still a good time to release this. It is a summer song and people are gonna want to listen to it when they’re having their social distancing garden parties. It’s still gonna be a good vibe for everyone even though it is in the middle of a pandemic. Not being able to go out and perform and promote it has been difficult, and obviously the fact that we haven’t been together – so we’ve been limited on the live streams and things we can do – has been a bit challenging.Jolie: During the pandemic there’s been so many breakups. I think it’s a really good breakup song for a lot of people that have just split up with their boyfriend after being with them in lockdown for about six weeks. I think it’ll do well in that sense.What do you have coming up after this single?Emma: At the moment we’ve been planning our second single. We’re trying to sort out the recording and our producer’s actually been moving studio at the moment. We’ve been trying to find the time to fit in. We’re supposed to be going to Nashville in November so fingers crossed that we’ll be able to go because we’ve got quite a lot of exciting writes out there. I think it’s probably going to be our most successful trip to date so we’re praying that we can get together. Because we’ve not been able to be together and do live streams and stuff that a lot of people have been doing, we’ve just really focused on our writing so that when we come out this pandemic, we’re going to have so much material. I feel like actually since writing in this pandemic we’ve come out with like a lot of good songs. We have at least four songs and we’re not sure how we’re going to choose what to put on the EP, we’ve got so much material now, and this is before we’ve even gone to Nashville. We are confident that even though it’s been difficult, we’ve just been focused so much on writing. The power of Zoom has been been wonderful, keeping us connected with people in Nashville and each other. We’re hoping that next year we’ll have an EP out and I think we’re aiming for October for a second release.Hopefully by that point we’ll be able to go to gigs again…Emma: Yeah, I just really want to perform. We’ve never actually performed I Don’t Need a Man with a full band. We’ve only ever done it acoustic which is really good but having the full like band will just be so good. So we’re hoping that like, however long it is, I’ve been I’m tempted full band is gonna be really good.What music has been getting you through the pandemic?Emma: We actually listen to quite a lot of the same music. We listen to a lot of Kacey Musgraves. Old Taylor Swift is what got us both into Country music.Jolie: Also Josh Kerr..Emma: Yeah, we’re big, big Josh fans. We’ve listened to him a lot. and he definitely inspires a lot of our writing because he’s such an incredible writer. The same with Kacey and Taylor Swift. We’ve definitely been listening to a lot of those really.Emma & Jolie’s debut single I Don’t Need a Man is released on Friday 10th July 2020. You can pre-save I Don’t Need a Man on Spotify now.last_img read more

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Praise for The United Friends of Highgate from Jamaican GG

first_imgJamaica’s Governor General, His Excellency Sir Patrick Allen had high praises for the United Friends of Highgate, (UFOH), a nonprofit organization dedicated to the development of Highgate in St. Mary, Jamaica. He delivered the keynote address to over 400 members of the South Florida Jamaica Diaspora in Cooper City, FL. last month.Sir Patrick Allen commended the United Friends of Highgate for the outstanding work they have been doing by engaging with the local Highgate community, as they conceive and develop plans to assist the community with medical supplies, educational tools, scholarships, infrastructural development and other socio-economic enterprises.  His Excellency told members of the organization that they are Jamaica’s “champion to the world like Usain Bolt” and “are valuable members of our development team.”“I thank you for all you do in uplifting the communities you live and the community of your birth. … and to helping advance our 2030 vision to make Jamaica the place of choice to live work raise families and do business,” he added. Sir Patrick challenged members of the organization and Jamaicans globally to engage more with the next generation – the youth.The Governor General, pointing to the success of several youth leaders in Jamaica, said the youth must be encouraged so that the vision of creating better societies can become a reality.Jamaican’s foremost comedian Oliver Samuels was at his best keeping the guest in high spirits showering the GG with accolades for being the “draw” for the event and not, as usual, himself. He kept the crown entertained throughout the entire event. The “UFOH,” pronounced [Hoo-Fah], was launched in Florida over 11 years ago and has a chapter in Highgate with Reverend Seymour Hutchinson as its President. The Florida chapter is headed by President Lorrimer Burford and its goal remains “contributing to the economical, physical, educational, environmental, cultural and social development of Highgate thus making the community a safe, healthy and enjoyable place to work, live and play.” For more see ufohus.org. The Florida chapter of the United Friends of Highgate Florida Chapter works with the Highgate Chapter to identify activities that need immediate attention at this time. These activities continue to extend themselves in the building up of the community of Highgate and its environs.UFOH activitiesThe projects targeted include:Food vouchers for 80 needy individuals at a cost of JA$2,000.00 each.Joint venture with the Richmond Community Consultative Committee in organizing a children’s treat for over 300 children at a cost of JA$50,000.00.Funding for bed linen, pampers, clothing (male/female) for the Annotto Bay hospital.Ongoing scholarship to two children entering High School.Funding for an annual visit to Pringles Home to feed 35 individuals as well as toiletry suppliesContinuing assistant for the activities of daily living, including provision of breakfast, baths, laundry and general housekeeping for an elderly person.last_img read more

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