Channel Tunnel migrant crisis: UK and France call on EU for support

first_imgHome secretary Theresa May and her French counterpart Bernard Cazeneuve have called on the EU to offer support in tackling the migrant crisis at Calais.  Read more: Migrants trying to enter UK via Channel Tunnel will face tighter security in France Over the last month, thousands of people have been trying to cross from France to the UK via the Channel Tunnel, resulting in nine migrant deaths. Severe delays to Eurotunnel train services have also resulted, with services currently running 30 minutes behind schedule from the UK.  Read more: Crisis in Calais takes its toll on Channel Tunnel trade: Disruption “having a severe effect on the UK economy” On Saturday night alone, hundreds of migrants pulled down security fences and stormed the tunnel, but riot police prevented them from crossing. The UK and France have each implemented their own security measures, including the deployment of 200 extra private security guards funded by the UK, French police reinforcements and extra security fencing, but the two countries want a more Europe-wide response to the problem. In an article in today’s Sunday Telegraph, the two politicians request the EU’s help in finding long-term solutions to the “global migration crisis”, arguing that it is related to the actions of the whole bloc: This situation cannot be seen as an issue just for our two countries. It is a priority at both a European and international level. Many of those in Calais and attempting to cross the Channel have made their way there through Italy, Greece or other countries. That is why we are pushing other member states – and the whole of the EU – to address this problem at root. Channel Tunnel migrant crisis: UK and France call on EU for support Show Comments ▼ whatsapp More From Our Partners Inside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comWhite House Again Downplays Fourth Possible Coronvirus Checkvaluewalk.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgInstitutional Investors Turn To Options to Bet Against AMCvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.org whatsapp Share Sunday 2 August 2015 9:46 am Tags: EU migrant crisis Sarah Spickernell last_img read more

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News / ILAs: radical change, but the fairest way to buy air freight capacity, says Qatar

first_img Qatar Airways Cargo has put itself at the forefront of a potentially radical change in the way air freight capacity is bought. It is the first carrier looking to use index-linked agreements (ILAs) with customers, a method likely to take off in large, but capacity-constrained markets, and which will “bring fairness and transparency to pricing”, giving airlines the ability to compete on issues other than rates. “ILAs … represent innovation for the industry and, as a company, our goal is to always stay ahead of the competition when it comes to improvement for our customers,” said Guillaume Halleux, chief officer cargo for Qatar. “Overall, rate transparency will increase, giving a clear reference of what a fair rate can be, which would then improve the overall efficiency of business transactions,” he told The Loadstar.  By Alex Lennane 03/09/2019 “On the airline side, for example, we expect it to reinforce the added value of operational reliability and of being able to deploy capacity in an agile way, in comparison to being the lowest quote in a procurement exercise.  “Our capacity and fleet is growing and this kind of agility is, coincidentally, one of our strengths.” ILAs are a procedure by which a contract includes a periodic adjustment to the prices paid for the contract, based on the level of a nominated price index. Since the launch of the TAC, there is now a reliable air freight price index, enabling the use of ILAs. The spot rate market is systemically volatile, explained Peter Stallion of Freight Investor Services. “Rates are spread between different airlines and different routes, which makes volatility inherent in the market. No one knows what everyone else is doing; it’s only since we’ve been able to observe it that we can see what the market does.” Using ILAs creates a fair and transparent way of ensuring the correct price is paid – although not every player seeks transparency, said Mr Stallion.“The top 10 forwarders want someone else to be the first entrant. Most airlines are on board – but not all. Some know they benefit from keeping rates as a bilateral discussion, where it is not transparent to the market. But with more indices, the market is going towards that – you can’t fight it for long.” But there is already interest, noted Mr Halleux. “Customers are very interested in knowing more about the initiative, and generally recognise that the index in relevant markets replicates market fluctuation. “It is a bit early to make any real prediction, but the ILAs seem to best work on large, yet capacity-constrained markets, such as Hong Kong, mainland China and Germany, to name a few.  “This is because of the mathematical requirement to have large amounts of data in order to produce a statistically relevant index. Capacity-constrained, because in such markets, traditional rate negotiation is more complex and less efficient due to the business requirement for every customer to secure a certain amount of capacity on the market. This means suppliers also have a fair bargaining power.  “In those markets, when the customer discloses his capacity requirement, he will generally lose some flexibility on the rate. But if he or she has a specific rate target, capacity might not be available.  “An ILA represents an efficient alternative to that problem, because it simplifies the discussion into a predominantly capacity discussion. We can imagine a future in which ILAs are a mainstream solution for those markets, but traditional rate-setting would still be expected to prevail in thinner tradelanes or for project cargo.” Qatar is running tests at the moment, looking at the indices available, the frequency of refreshes and the relative position to that index. “This means we could complete it very quickly, but that is all depending on the customer’s preference.”  Freight Investor Services is looking to the next step, to launch an air freight derivatives market, but Mr Halleux thinks this could be some way off. “We have certainly met people who think that is the next step. The reality is that the implementation is slower and the first step is paper contracts. ILAs have already been a few years in the making. So we will take it one step at a time.”last_img read more

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Deaths in Laois – Tuesday, June 18, 2019

first_img 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin Pinterest GAA Facebook Twitter GAA WhatsApp Pinterest Deaths in Laois – Tuesday, June 18, 2019 Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory GAA Below are the recent deaths in Laois.Ar Dheis De go raibh a anam.Anne CourtneyArles, Ballickmoyler, Laois / CarlowAnne Courtney of Arles , Co Laois passed away peacefully on June 17th at her daughter Heather’s home Arles, Ballickmoyler.Loving mother and grandmother, she will be greatly missed by all her family.Short time of Thanksgiving and Prayer at her daughter Heather’s home (Eircode R93 CF86) on Wednesday evening 19th June at 7pm.Memorial and Burial in Belfast on Saturday 22nd June, time to be confirmed shortly.“We have a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead”.Bobby (Robert) KennedyCork Road, Stradbally, LaoisBobby (Robert) Kennedy, Cork Rd., Stradbally, Co. Laois. Pre-deceased by his wife Rene. Sadly missed by his daughters Caroline, Iris, Jillian and son Mervyn, sons-in-law Victor, Jaime and John, daughter-in-law Marie, grandchildren Adam, Aaron, Jack, Finn, Jorge and Sarah, sisters Rachel and Violet, brothers Larry, Johnny and Joe and extended family, neighbours and friends.Reposing at his home 6:00pm Monday 17th. Removal at 6:30pm Tuesday 18th to arrive at St. Patrick’s Church, Stradbally for 7:00pm. Funeral Service at 12 noon on Wednesday 19th, followed by burial in Oakvale Churchyard.Patsy O’ConnorOld Mills, Stradbally, Laois / Clonbullogue, OffalyPatsy passed away peacefully after along illness bravely borne in the presence of his loving family. Sadly missed by his wife Esther, daughters Deirdre, Fiona and Aisling, his three grandchildren, son-in-law, brothers Joe, Frank, Ollie, Noel and sister Kathleen, brother-in-law, sisters-in-law, nieces, nephews, relatives, neighbours and friends.May Patsy Rest In Peace.Reposing at his residence on Tuesday from 2 o clock until recital of the Rosary at 8 o clock on Tuesday evening. Private removal on Wednesday afternoon to arrive to The Sacred Heart Church Stradbally for 2 o clock Requiem Mass. Followed by Interment in Oakvale Cemetery. House private on Wednesday please.Joan GreeneThe Orchard, Stradbally, LaoisJoan passed away peacefully on 15th June surrounded by her family. Sadly missed by her partner Daithi, her daughter Amanda, son D.J., mother Mary, brother Paul, sister Patricia, sister-in- law Julie, extended family, neighbours and friends.Reposing at her home The Orchard from 6pm today, and all day Monday, recital of The Rosary at 8pm on both Sunday and Monday evening. Removal on Tuesday morning at 9.30am to arrive at The Sacred Heart Church, Stradbally for 10am Requiem Mass. Burial thereafter in Moyanna Cemetery.Diarmuid FogartyKnockiel, Rathdowney, LaoisDiarmuid Fogarty, Knockiel, Rathdowney, Co. Laois. June 14th 2019. Peacefully at Portlaoise Regional Hospital in his 95th year. Deeply regretted by his loving wife Mary and his sons George and James and his brother Paul, nephews, nieces, neighbours, relatives and friends.Reposing at O’ Sullivan’s funeral home, Rathdowney this Sunday evening from 7pm with rosary at 8pm. Funeral prayers on Monday evening at 6:30 followed by removal at 7pm to The Church Of The Holy Trinity, Rathdowney. Funeral Mass on Tuesday at 11am followed by burial in Rathdowney Local Cemetery.May His Gentle Soul Rest In PeaceWinnifred StokesMountmellick, LaoisWinnifred Stokes, Mountmellick and London died unexpectedly on 7th June 2019. Predeceased by her husband Paudge on 8th June 2018. Deeply regretted by her family. Reposing in Moloneys Funeral Home, Mountmellick on Monday evening from 5 o’clock, removal at 6.45pm to St. Josephs Church, Mountmellick arriving at 7 o’clock. Requiem Mass on Tuesday at 11 o’clock, burial afterwards in St. Josephs cemetery, Mountmellick.SEE ALSO – Deaths in Laois – Monday, June 17, 2019 By Alan Hartnett – 18th June 2019 Previous articleOpen Day in Clonohill Gardens for Laois Hospice this weekendNext articleAll of this week’s Laois GAA fixtures Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results Home Deaths Deaths in Laois – Tuesday, June 18, 2019 Deaths Twitter Facebook TAGSDeaths in Laois last_img read more

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Insurers to rely on acquisitions and partnerships to fuel growth: survey

first_img Facing sluggish industry growth and agile new competition, insurance executives are actively pursuing acquisitions and partnerships to transform and grow their businesses, according to a new report from KPMG International, Accelerated evolution — M&A, transformation and innovation in the insurance industry.In fact, 80% of insurance executives surveyed for the report expect to seek one to three acquisition targets or partnership opportunities over the next three years. Record M&A activity in Q1, Crosbie & Co. says Global M&A sets Q1 record, Refinitiv says IE Staff Keywords Mergers and acquisitions,  Life insurance industry KPMG worked with Mergermarket to interview more than 200 global insurance executives involved in mergers and acquisitions (M&A), strategy and innovation initiatives at their respective organizations to learn about their outlook for the industry and their expectations as they plan to strategically deploy capital.The majority of insurers are intending to make acquisitions that could transform their organization for the future, rather than merely enhance their current business and operating models. More than 60% of the 200 executives surveyed globally said transforming their business or operating model would be the key factors driving acquisitions, while just 21% identified enhancing their current model as the key factor.“Insurers are competing for market share in a slow-growth environment, that is experiencing an influx of dynamic new insurtech players,” said Laura Hay, head of global insurance for KPMG International, in a statement. “They know they can’t rely just on organic growth to meet their objectives, so alliances and acquisitions become essential as insurers look to engage with customers in new and different ways, and gain access to innovative operating capabilities and technology infrastructure to reshape their business and drive future growth.”In terms of geography, a majority of insurance executives are looking for inorganic opportunities outside their country of domicile, with 66% expecting to conduct cross-border deals, while just 32% say they expect deals to be focused domestically. The distinction is particularly telling with respect to partnerships and alliances over the next three years, with 39% expecting these to be cross-border and only 6% anticipating domestic alliances.North America, particularly the United States, is widely expected by the insurance executives surveyed to have the most insurance M&A activity in the coming three years. Asia-Pacific is projected to be the region where insurers have the most partnership opportunities, and Western Europe is expected to drive relatively more divestiture activity.Survey respondents were divided regionally among firms in Asia-Pacific, Europe, Middle East and Africa, and North America as well as by the segments life, non-life, reinsurance, and other , encompasses insurance brokers and Insurance services. Companies needed to have a minimum of US$1.5 billion in annual revenue to qualify for participation. BMO asset management sale is on strategy: Moody’s Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Paper family of four under a paper cutout insurance umbrella zimmytws/123RF Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Transcript: Alexis George with Rafael Epstein – ABC Radio Melbourne Drive

first_imgTranscript: Alexis George with Rafael Epstein – ABC Radio Melbourne Drive Rafael Epstein: It’s a year to the day since the Premier said you can’t go and get on the beers at home. It is the first time in a year that you can have 100 people over at your home, although not quite yet. Got to wait til Friday, six o’clock. The other really big and significant announcement from the State Government today, off the back of the Chief Health Officer recommendations, our office blocks in the centre of the city, they can go back to full capacity. So will they go back? Is that helpful? Do they want to go back? Alexis George joins us, the deputy CEO of ANZ, one of the biggest companies in the country. Their head office in Melbourne has about 12,000 staff. Alexis George, thanks for joining us.Alexis George: Thank you very much for having me.Rafael Epstein: If the state government says you can have everyone back, does that mean everyone? How does that impact on a company like ANZ?Alexis George: It’s a very big question and, we’ve been dealing with this. It’s interesting, you talked about it up front, we sent everyone home on the 18th of March. So it’s over a year now that most of our people in Melbourne have been working from home. And, we’ve had to adapt our workplace for the various different regulations that we’ve had in place. So at the moment we, for instance, can only have 50 per cent of people in the workplace because we need to make sure there’s physical distancing, etc. If I look at it, we’ve probably only had about, maximum 2500. So, we’re quite a way from that full time in the office. And while I think it’s great that we can get people back now, we’ve also got to understand that, it has been a year working from home. It’s a big change for people and we’ve got to look after their mental and physical well-being in bringing back in the office and making sure we can support them through that change.Rafael Epstein: Do you think you, will you even get to 80 per cent back, do you think?Alexis George: Well, we said to our people that our vision of the work going forward is going to be two to three days in the office and two to three days at home. And that’s what they’ve been telling us, is something they would like. I think it’s important that we be in the office because it is really good for culture, for new people, for leadership, etc. But that’s kind of where we’ll go to, three days in the office, two to three days at home. So, I’d like to think we’ll get back to the 80 per cent, but it’s going to take time Raf.Rafael Epstein: Can I be really … I don’t know if you can be specific, Alexis George. Will you hit that 80 per cent you said you would like to. So that sounds like you’re definitely not going to go back to 100 per cent. Will you get to 80?Alexis George: Well we’re not going to go back to everyone working in the office every day a week. That’s just not going to happen. I think, we’ve all got to accept that work has changed over the last 12 months and it’s not going to go back to that.Rafael Epstein: And 80 per cent? Is that going to happen do you think?Alexis George: Well, I think that’s where we’ll get to if people work in the office two to three days a week. And that’s what we’re asking people to do. For all those reasons I just talked about before; culture, new starters, just solving problems. It’s so much easier if they can physically talk to someone.Rafael Epstein: I’m not sure what city you spend most of your time in, but I think that ANZ building is the bottom of Collins Street, isn’t it? Into Docklands.Alexis George: Yes, that’s right.Rafael Epstein: I assume, if you’re only 80 per cent, do you stay in the building? Do you stay as the dominant tenant in that building?Alexis George: We’ve been looking at our property footprint because we’ve had many buildings throughout Melbourne. I think at one point, maybe even seven. So, yes while the head office is down in Docklands, we’ve got several others. And we’ve been consolidating down into that campus over a number of years. So, we’re going to continue to look at the property footprint. I think we’re in the early days of seeing how people are going to behave. So we’re just going to have to manage that over the coming months and see what happens and what it looks like and how people are going to behave.Rafael Epstein: So that’s a maybe you might have to sell off city property?Alexis George: We don’t actually own anything except our head office.Rafael Epstein: Well get rid of some leases, I mean?Alexis George: Yes, I mean we’ll just look at that as we watch what happens with people’s behavior. And as I said, we’ve been out of the office for a year. It’s a big change getting people back in.Rafael Epstein: Then does it matter what the state government sets as a capacity limit? I’m hearing different things privately about this company did want the 100 per cent, another company didn’t. Do those announcements matter?Alexis George: I think they matter in that they allow us to get full teams in at once. Because at the moment, as I just mentioned to you, we’ve only got 50 per cent capacity. So that means we can only bring 50 per cent of the team in at once. And I think, why do we all love being at work? Because we love being with our mates. We love having a chat as well as getting the work done. So I think it does allow us to be a bit more flexible with that footprint and just create that greater sense of fun about being back there.Rafael Epstein: Really appreciate you joining us today, Alexis George. Thank you very much.Alexis George: No problem. Thank you.Rafael Epstein: The deputy CEO of ANZ. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:ABC, ANZ, ANZ Bank, Australia, bank, behavior, building, culture, Government, health, Impact, leadership, love, Melbourne, mental, Premier, property read more

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Clark College trustees approve 2021 tenured faculty

first_imgThey will be honored at a college reception later in the springVANCOUVER — Twelve educators are the newest members of the tenured faculty at Clark College. In 2021, Clark College welcomed 12 newly tenured faculty members (shown here, clockwise from top left) Joseph Cavalli (history), Mark Eddinger (mathematics), Amy Ewing Johnson (dental hygiene), Melissa J. Favara (English), Tyler H.J. Frank (career and academic preparation), Doug Harris (music), Christina Howard (biology), Dr. Sarah Kuzera (medical assisting), Dr. Michelle Mayer (mathematics), Kristin Sherwood (College 101), Beth Slovic (journalism), and Christina Smith (English). Photo courtesy of Clark CollegeIn 2021, Clark College welcomed 12 newly tenured faculty members (shown here, clockwise from top left) Joseph Cavalli (history), Mark Eddinger (mathematics), Amy Ewing Johnson (dental hygiene), Melissa J. Favara (English), Tyler H.J. Frank (career and academic preparation), Doug Harris (music), Christina Howard (biology), Dr. Sarah Kuzera (medical assisting), Dr. Michelle Mayer (mathematics), Kristin Sherwood (College 101), Beth Slovic (journalism), and Christina Smith (English). Photo courtesy of Clark CollegeJoseph Cavalli (history), Mark Eddinger (mathematics), Amy Ewing Johnson (dental hygiene), Melissa J. Favara (English), Tyler H.J. Frank (career and academic preparation), Doug Harris (music), Christina Howard (biology), Dr. Sarah Kuzera (medical assisting), Dr. Michelle Mayer (mathematics), Kristin Sherwood (College 101), Beth Slovic (journalism), and Christina Smith (English) were all granted tenure during the Clark College Board of Trustees meeting on March 10. They will be honored at a college reception later in the spring. Tenure is awarded by the college’s Board of Trustees based on professional excellence and outstanding abilities in their disciplines. The granting of tenure is based on the recommendations of tenure review committees to the vice president of instruction, which are then forwarded to the president, who presents a final recommendation to the Board of Trustees. Recommendations are based on self-evaluations, tenure review committee evaluations, student evaluations, supervisory evaluations, and peer evaluations. The final decision to award or withhold tenure rests with the Board of Trustees. About the faculty members:Joseph Cavalli, history Joseph Cavalli holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Portland State University and a Master of Arts in history degree from University of Portland. He has experience teaching in private high schools in Croatia, Italy, the Kingdom of Bahrain, and Portland, Oregon. He has also taught history at University of Maryland College Park and Mt. Hood Community College, in addition to his experience teaching history at Clark College since 2006.  At Clark College, he has served as program director for the college’s Model United Nations team since 2011. He is also a popular instructor in the Clark’s non-credit Mature Learning program and in 2016 received the college’s prestigious Exceptional Faculty Award.  “My approach to history is best summed up by the American historian John Tracy Ellis: ‘History is the rediscovery of the past in an enlightened manner,’” said Cavalli. “I am always striving to make history applicable to my students’ everyday lives in a way that piques their interest and curiosity.” Mark Eddinger, mathematics Mark Eddinger, a Ridgefield resident, earned his Bachelor of Science degree in electronics engineering technology from DeVry Institute of Technology and his Master of Science in mathematics from Western Washington University. He began his career as a quality engineer at a manufacturer of lighting control systems before spending a decade teaching English as a foreign language in Japan. In addition to this work experience, he has taught math at the college level for 11 years. At Clark College, Eddinger serves on the Math Events Committee, as well as on the team that has developed, improved, and supported a new math pathway for non-STEM majors. He has also designed Canvas courses that promote inclusion and shares them with his colleagues. “I am committed to being a fellow journeyer with my students as we nurture our growth mindsets, as we learn how to make a more effective effort, and as we develop a passion for more thorough understanding of both math and the many academic disciplines that connect to math,” he said, adding, “They all connect.” Amy Ewing Johnson, dental hygiene Amy Ewing Johnson, a resident of Vancouver, attended Indiana University’s School of Dentistry, where she earned three degrees: an Associate in Science in dental hygiene, a Bachelor of Science in public health dental hygiene, and a Master of Science in education. She has more than 30 years of work experience in dental settings.  At Clark College, Ewing Johnson serves as lead instructor and coordinator for all clinical and lab operations related to junior-year students. She is involved in dental hygiene study clubs, and continues to improve her own learning by attending state and national conferences. “My teaching philosophy is all about making students feel safe to learn through experimentation, question/answer, as well as confident enough to learn via discussions and active learning opportunities,” said Ewing Johnson. “I believe in creating a warm and relaxed classroom community and work to communicate an enthusiasm of support for every student, as they strive to complete their academic goals.” Melissa Favara, English Melissa Favara earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in English with a creative writing emphasis from Western Michigan University and her Master of Arts degree in English from The Pennsylvania State University. Favara joined the faculty at Clark College in 2007, first as an adjunct and then as a full-time temporary instructor. She served as the college’s Academic Early Warning liaison from 2009 to 2020. She currently assists in training fellow English faculty members on the college’s new co-requisite teaching model to serve its most at-risk students; she has previously taught in the Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training program and has presented at national conferences on Clark’s work in both practices. Favara described her teaching philosophy as follows: “I meet students where they are and engage them in learning opportunities that honor their experience while offering chances to gain and apply knowledge in ways that they can transfer to new school, work, and life challenges.” Tyler Frank, career and academic preparation Tyler Frank earned his Associate in Arts transfer degree from Grand Rapids Community College; his Bachelor of Arts degree in history from the University of Michigan; and his Master of Arts degree in reading and culture from the University of Arizona. He served as a youth development facilitator for the U.S. Peace Corp in Huallanca, Peru, and has previous teaching experience at Pima Community College in Tucson, Arizona. Since joining the faculty at Clark College in 2018, Frank has involved himself deeply in the college’s work. He has developed a fully online version of the CAP 42 (Integrated Math and Science) course, developed Open Educational Resources (OER), and led the outcomes assessment for CAP mathematics faculty. He also leads the “Anti-Racists Curriculum and Instruction” subgroup of the college’s White Anti-Racism Education Employee Resource Group. “As a teacher, I prioritize creating a safe and welcoming environment for my students, where we all feel comfortable enough to explore new ideas, make mistakes, and share our discoveries and confusions with one another,” said Frank in describing his teaching philosophy. Doug Harris, music Doug Harris, a Vancouver resident, earned his Bachelor of Music in music education degree from the University of Florida, after which he continued his education at the University of Northern Colorado, earning both his master’s and doctoral degrees in music there. He has directed bands at multiple middle and high schools, as well as at Santa Clara University and Western Kentucky University. Since joining the faculty at Clark College in 2018, he has led the college’s concert band, jazz band, and pep band, as well as directing the college’s annual Jazz Festival. “I strive to help each student achieve their potential through positive reinforcement within a rigorous curriculum,” Harris said in describing his teaching philosophy. Christina Howard, biology Christina Howard attended Portland State University, where she earned both her Bachelor of Science degree in biology and her Master of Science degree in behavioral neuroendocrinology. She has teaching experience at Portland State University and Portland Community College, and served as Lead Instructor of Human Anatomy and Physiology at the National College of Technical Instruction’s College of Emergency Services. She joined the faculty at Clark College in 2018. At Clark, Howard serves as an event runner for the annual Science Olympiad, as well as co-lead advisor for cadaver dissection. “My teaching philosophy is to help students find wonder in the biological sciences, specifically the study of the human body,” she said. “I employ an evidence-based and applied-learning approach to engender deep learning and curiosity for the subject matter, so that students can show mastery and better understand how biology applies to them.” Dr. Sarah Kuzera, medical assisting Dr. Sarah Kuzera, a Vancouver resident, earned her Associate in Applied Science in medical assisting from Springfield College; her bachelor’s degree in management from Everest College; her Master of Business Administration degree from Bryan University; and her Doctor of Education degree from Capella University. She holds certifications through the American Association of Medical Assistants and the American Medical Technologists. She has six years of work experience as a certified medical assistant in a variety of practices and clinics. She has nine years of experience teaching in post-secondary environments.  Since joining the faculty at Clark College in 2017, Dr. Kuzera has served the college in many roles. She developed a Medical Assisting Club at the college and served on a Guided Pathways Pillar One work group. She has served on the Evergreen School District’s Medical Science Advisory Board and participated in Clark College’s Instructional Planning Team and Curriculum committees. “I believe that teaching should always be student-centered and I should facilitate the teaching environment,” Dr. Kuzera said. “My role as an instructor is to provide students, through my experiences and expertise, the necessary resources for them to produce learning and foster critical thinking. I have always been flexible in my teaching strategies to adapt to the needs of the adult learner.“ Dr. Michelle Mayer, mathematics Michelle Mayer earned her Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics from George Fox University in Newberg, Oregon. She continued her education at Texas Tech University, where she earned both a master’s and a doctorate degree in mathematics. She has previous teaching experience at Texas Tech University and Pacific University. Since joining the Clark College faculty in 2018, Dr. Mayer has become the course co-coordinator for the applied algebra courses MATH 092 and MATH 096. “My approach to teaching is to present the material with clarity and accessibility; create an open environment where students feel comfortable asking questions and interacting with me; and to challenge my students to think critically while giving them the support they need to succeed,” said Dr. Mayer. Kristin Sherwood, College 101 Kristin Sherwood earned her bachelor’s degree from Lewis & Clark College and her master’s degree in public administration from Portland State University. She has previous work experience as the Community Service Coordinator at Lewis & Clark College and as the Outreach Coordinator for the City of Vancouver’s Community Services Department. In 2003, she began teaching in the human development department of Clark College; ten years later, she began serving as the coordinator of the College 101 course, which provides guidance to incoming college students. At Clark College, Sherwood serves on the Foundation Scholarship Selection Committee, the MyPlan Work Group, and the Guided Pathways Advisory Committee. She also regularly presents in the Student Success Workshops presented through Career Services. “I aspire to empower, engage, and encourage my students with knowledge and resources to support their academic success,” said Sherwood in describing her teaching philosophy. “I do this by developing rapport, making sincere connections, providing timely and thoughtful feedback, and maintaining a genuine commitment to my classes.” Beth Slovic, journalism Beth Slovic earned her bachelor’s degree from Amherst College and her master’s degree from Columbia University. She has work experience as an editorial assistant at a nonprofit book publisher and as a print  journalist at the Bozeman Daily Chronicle, Willamette Week, the Oregonian, and the Portland Tribune. For the past 13 years, she has worked as an occasional stringer for the New York Times, and she freelances regularly for Portland Monthly and PDX Parent magazines. She has previous teaching experience at Clackamas Community College, Portland State University, and the University of Portland.  Since joining the Clark College faculty in 2018, she has become the journalism advisor to the Clark College Independent. She also serves as president of the Pacific Northwest Association of Journalism Educators. “I believe journalism is a framework for talking about skills and concepts that serve students in wider pursuits,” Slovic said of her teaching philosophy. “My students seek answers to questions and communicate across multiple platforms, making them the ‘communicorns’ of the future.” Christina Smith, English Christina Smith, a Vancouver resident, earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in English from McDaniel College and her Master of Arts degree in rhetoric and writing studies from the University of Utah. She has previous teaching experience at the University of Utah.  Since joining the faculty of Clark College in 2015, Smith has served on several committees and work groups, including the Vice President of Instruction Hiring Committee, the Vice President of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Hiring Committee, the Tenure Review Equity Committee, the Women’s Studies Scholarship Review Committee, the Clark College Forms Committee, and the Student Code of Conduct Policy and Training Work Group. Additionally, she has presented at both the Queer Student Luncheon and the “Discovering College Confidence” workshop.  “My approach to teaching is what I would call adaptive, holistic, and rhetorical,” said Smith. “Adaptive teaching means discovering how each student learns and processes information, as this will let me find the appropriate teaching methods and tools to successfully communicate course content. This adaptability also speaks to my holistic approach to instruction. I believe it is important to engage the whole person, not just the student-mind that is present in my course; this means providing supports that address their personal needs while simultaneously challenging them as learners.” About Clark College  Founded in 1933, Clark College provides residents of Southwest Washington with affordable, high-quality academic and technical education. It is a public community college offering more than 100 degree and certificate programs, including bachelor’s and associate degrees; professional certificates; high school diplomas and GED preparation; and non-credit community and continuing education. Clark serves a wide range of students including high school students, displaced workers, veterans, parents, non-native English speakers, and mature learners. Approximately three-quarters of its students are in the first generation of their families to attend college.  AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Beth SlovicChristina HowardChristina SmithClark CollegeClark CountyClark County WashingtonCommunity CollegeDoug HarrisfacultyKristin Sherwoodlocal newsMichelle MayerSarah KuzerastafftenureVancouverVancouver Washingtonshare 0 Previous : Clark Public Utilities board approves $20 million customer bill credit and $5 million COVID Assistance Fund Next : Woodland’s PASS program helped a Class of 2021 graduate transform from struggling freshman to graduating a semester earlyAdvertisementThis is placeholder text Clark College trustees approve 2021 tenured facultyPosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Wednesday, March 17, 2021in: Community Newsshare 0 last_img read more

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CU-Boulder Study Says Jets on Saturn Moon Enceladus Not Geysers From Underground Ocean

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Water vapor jets that spew from the surface of Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus are not really geysers from an underground ocean as initially envisioned by planetary scientists, according to a study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder.First observed following a close flyby by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft in July 2005, the jets were found to consist of both water vapor and icy particles, said Professor Nicholas Schneider of CU-Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. The jets inspired speculation by planetary scientists that they were geysers — violent explosions of water out of a vent caused by expanding bubbles of water vapor emanating from an ocean beneath the icy crust of Enceladus.Scientists hypothesized that if such an ocean did exist, it might provide a suitable environment for primitive life forms, said Schneider, who led the study. “We wondered if there was an ocean underneath that crust and wondered if it is just spraying out through cracks like a geyser boiling away into space,” he said.To test the theory, Schneider and his colleagues performed experiments to find the relative content of sodium in the water vapor component of the jets. If the jets were geysers originating from an underground ocean, then the sodium content in the water vapor should be high. Schneider said such sodium should give off the same yellow light that comes off street lights, and that the world’s best telescopes can detect even a small number of sodium atoms orbiting Saturn.Observations by Schneider’s team using the 10-meter Keck 1 telescope and the 4-meter Anglo-Australian telescope, however, demonstrated that few if any sodium atoms existed in the water vapor. “It would have been very exciting to support the geyser hypothesis. But it is not what Mother Nature is telling us,” said Schneider.The study was published in the June 25 issue of Nature along with a companion study by other researchers that analyzed the icy grains that also make up the expelled jets.The companion study concluded there was at least some salt in the particles in the plume, suggesting the particles may have come from an ocean.”Since our observing team did not find salt in the vapor, our conclusions speak to the conditions of a possible underground ocean on Enceladus,” Schneider said.One suggested explanation for the contrasting results from the two studies is that deep caverns may exist where water evaporates slowly, said Schneider. When the evaporation process is slow the vapor contains little sodium, just like water evaporating from the ocean. The vapor turns into a jet because it leaks out of small cracks in the crust into the vacuum of space.”Only if the evaporation is more explosive would it contain more salt,” said Schneider. “This idea of slow evaporation from a deep cavernous ocean is not the dramatic idea that we imagined before, but it is possible given both our results so far.”But Schneider also cautions that several other explanations for the jets are equally plausible. “It could still be warm ice vaporizing away into space. It could even be places where the crust rubs against itself from tidal motions and the friction creates liquid water that would then evaporate into space,” he said.”These are all hypotheses but we can’t verify any one with the results so far,” said Schneider. “We have to take them all with, well, a grain of salt.”The project has been funded by the National Science Foundation and has been carried out in collaboration with scientists from the University of Maryland and the Institute for Astronomy in Honolulu. Published: June 24, 2009 last_img read more

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SevenFifty, a Platform for the Beverage Alcohol Industry, Launches a New…

first_imgAdvertisementNew York, NY—July 17, 2017—Today, SevenFifty Technologies, Inc., an online platform for the beverage alcohol trade, launches SevenFifty Daily, a new online magazine covering the business and culture of drinks. SevenFifty Daily’s mission is to connect the U.S. community of drinks professionals, creating a space that fosters conversation and a platform for showcasing the people and ideas moving the industry forward. Unlike other industry publications that focus primarily on an audience of corporate executives, SevenFifty Daily will serve working beverage professionals across a wide range of roles in the industry.Erica Duecy, who comes to SevenFifty after holding Digital Director roles at Architectural Digest (Condé Nast) and Saveur (Bonnier Corp.), and is author of the cocktail book Storied Sips (Random House), will serve as Editor in chief. SevenFifty Daily will cover all three tiers of the industry, working with talented and trusted journalists including Jon Bonné, Megan Krigbaum, Wayne Curtis, Katherine Cole, Maggie Hoffman, Lew Bryson, and Betsy Andrews. Launch features include:A profile of The Sisterhood Project, a grassroots community-building initiative that offers mentorship and career coaching to women working in bars and restaurantsThe role of no-dosage wines in the Champagne compendiumHow hidden tech is being used on the restaurant floor to improve the customer experienceWine consulting in the gig economy, looking at the trend of somms consulting for multiple venues The Voices section will provide a forum for discussing issues that matter to members of the trade. The debut package, “Do Wine Scores Still Matter?” was curated by award-winning writer and author Jon Bonné, featuring essays from Joshua Greene of Wine & Spirits, Neal Martin of The Wine Advocate, Lorena Ascencios of Astor Wines & Spirits, and Sashi Moorman of Domaine de la Côte and Sandhi Wines, among others.“The launch of SevenFifty Daily marks a new chapter for the community of more than 100,000 trade professionals that use SevenFifty to do their work,” said Aaron Sherman, Co-Founder and CEO of SevenFifty. “Our goal is to help the three tiers operate effectively by connecting members of the trade with the stories and information that matters to most to them. SevenFifty Daily is where professionals can learn from top industry experts and discuss the many topics in the trade that aren’t talked about elsewhere.”While SevenFifty works directly with on- and off-premise retailers, distributors, and suppliers, SevenFifty Daily has editorial autonomy—and a mission to clearly and accurately cover the drinks industry. In addition to its daily publishing schedule, SevenFifty Daily offers a weekly newsletter featuring top-performing stories, as well as regular social media posts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.About SevenFiftySevenFifty connects the beverage alcohol trade on one easy-to-use platform that makes browsing distributor portfolios, communicating with your reps, and submitting orders incredibly easy. SevenFifty is used by tens of thousands of restaurant, bar, and retail buyers across the country and operates in 36 states. For more information, please visit www.sevenfifty.com.Advertisement ReddIt Facebook Share Email Previous articleGlobal Spirits Signs with Baystate Wine & Spirits to Distribute Vodkas & Brandy in New HampshireNext articlePetainer Sponsors London Craft Beer Festival Press Release Pinterest Home Industry News Releases SevenFifty, a Platform for the Beverage Alcohol Industry, Launches a New Online…Industry News ReleasesSevenFifty, a Platform for the Beverage Alcohol Industry, Launches a New Online Magazine, SevenFifty DailyBy Press Release – July 17, 2017 718 0 TAGSSevenFifty Linkedin Twitterlast_img read more

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JCAA confirms aircraft accident

first_imgRelatedJCAA confirms aircraft accident Issued by: The Jamaica Civil Aviation Authority  JCAA confirms aircraft accident TransportMarch 4, 2011 RelatedJCAA confirms aircraft accident FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Jamaica Civil Aviation Authority is confirming reports of an aircraft incident at the Norman Manley International Airport. The JCAA is currently dispatching a team of investigators to the scene. Further information on this accident will be provided by the JCAA as soon as the information becomes available.   RelatedJCAA confirms aircraft accident Advertisementslast_img

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Minister Thwaites encourages GSAT Students

first_imgRelatedRed Hills Community grateful for new School Minister Thwaites encourages GSAT StudentsJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay RelatedEducation Ministry to Stage Math Expo Advertisements Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister Education, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites (left), engages eager students at the Emmanuel Christian Academy, in St. Andrew, today (March 12). The Minister was invited to the school to make a special address to students who are preparing to sit the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) on March 20 and 21. Rev. Thwaites also answered questions posed to by students, as well as toured the facility, opened a computer laboratory which was refurbished by the Parent Teachers Association (PTA). Minister Thwaites encourages GSAT Students EducationMarch 13, 2014Written by: Garfield Anguscenter_img Story HighlightsMinister of Education, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, has lauded the work of the Emmanuel Christian Academy, for its preparation of students for the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT).The Minister encouraged the GSAT students to relax as much as they can and revise instead of try to absorb new material. Principal Adjoa Dawes, said the Minister was invited to be introduced to the facility that has been in operation since 2000, and for the students to learn from him. RelatedEducation Minister Calls on Communities to Protect Schools Minister of Education, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, has lauded the work of the Emmanuel Christian Academy, for its preparation of students for the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT).The Minister visited the institution on Olivier Road, in North Central St. Andrew   today Wednesday (March 12), to make a special address to students who will sit the GSAT on March 20 and 21. He answered questions from the students, toured the facility, opened a computer laboratory refurbished by the Parents and Teachers Association (PTA), and met with other students.Minister Thwaites said organisations should continue to invest in schools. “It falls exactly within the priorities of the Ministry of Education, we encourage churches to set up educational institutions of quality, as they always did throughout our history, and we welcome people making investments in educational. Emmanuel does very well, and their facilities are well thought-out,” he said.The Minister encouraged the GSAT students to relax as much as they can and revise instead of try to absorb new material. “Just be calm and thoughtful about the process…accept whatever placement in high school, because we are all fortunate to be able to get a place in high school,” the Minister said, while stressing that Emmanuel has prepared them to do well at the various secondary institutions.Principal Adjoa Dawes, said the Minister was invited to be introduced to the facility that has been in operation since 2000, and for the students to learn from him. “The Minister of Education has a part to play in what happens with them, his responses covered what they asked; pertaining to the selection of schools, I thought that he handled it very well. He encouraged them to bloom where they are planted, and to make the best of their opportunities,” she said.The Principal reported that students who were educated at the school are doing well in the major exams, while the school excels in the arts, sports, and other areas. Spanish teacher, Pathellia Richards, told JIS News that the school encourages the educators and parents,  to be involved in all aspects of the children’s development.“The parents make an effort to partnership with the teachers, to help the students to do well, by knowing what the home-work is, and participate in the completion of projects. There is a special time each year where the parents are allowed to come and observe the lessons, so that they can help their children to do better. The partnership is extremely important, it is us together, building to make them better citizens,” Miss Richards explained. The school is operated by the Emmanuel Baptist Church. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail last_img read more

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