Knight Capital software glitch leads to US$440 million loss

Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Keywords Electronic trading “Although the company’s capital base has been severely impacted, the company’s broker/dealer subsidiaries are in full compliance with their net capital requirements,” it says, adding that it is now actively pursuing “strategic and financing alternatives to strengthen its capital base.” The offending software has been removed from the company’s systems, it notes, adding that its clients were not negatively affected by the erroneous orders, and the software issue was limited to the routing of certain listed stocks to the NYSE. Related news LME plans to close trading floor for good ITG expands into agency trading BMO Financial to acquire fintech firm New York City trading firm Knight Capital Group, Inc. said Thursday that a technical glitch at the open of trading on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) Wednesday has caused a US$440 million loss at the firm and sent it looking to shore up its capital. Knight said that faulty installation of trading software resulted in the firm sending numerous erroneous orders in NYSE-listed securities into the market. It has now traded out of its entire erroneous position, which has resulted in a realized pre-tax loss of approximately US$440 million, it said. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media James Langton read more

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FINRA task force recommends improving securities arbitration system

first_img SIFMA opposes state fiduciary standards James Langton “It is the unanimous, strongly held opinion of the task force that the most important investment in the future of the FINRA forum is in the arbitrators,” the report says. “The task force has concerns that the arbitrators’ below market rate compensation acts as a disincentive in the recruitment of arbitrators and in the commitment of substantial time by arbitrators in executing their responsibilities.” Among other things, the FINRA task force’s report calls for an increase in arbitrator honoraria to $500 a session from $300 and to $1,000 a day from $600. The task force also makes several recommendations relating to the recruitment and training of arbitrators. In the report, the task force also says that it believes that the writing of explained decisions is the second most important category of recommendations that it’s making, “because the availability of explained decisions would improve the transparency of the forum.” Although the report calls for a default to written decisions, it notes that this would require further training. The report also tackles the issue of mandatory arbitration, noting, that “[t]he mandatory nature of SRO securities arbitration is a defining characteristic of the process that engenders controversy about its fairness.” However, the task force was not able to reach a consensus on whether arbitration should be mandatory. Nevertheless, it concluded that “the debate over mandatory securities arbitration is, to a large extent, a philosophical or policy question about which thoughtful, informed individuals disagree and which the task force cannot settle. The task force, therefore, decided that it was a better use of its limited time and resources to focus on the current system of FINRA arbitration and propose recommendations to improve it.” These proposed changes “will entail significant costs,” the task force’s report notes, which will be passed on to the users of the system. FINRA’s standing advisory committee on the arbitration system will review the task force’s recommendations. It will make recommendations on reforms that could be implemented immediately; those that will require further discussion; and items that may not be feasible. “FINRA convened the task force from a diverse group — representing a broad range of viewpoints — to look at all aspects of dispute resolution between investors and brokers,” says Richard Ketchum, FINRA’s chairman and CEO, in a statement. “It is clear from the report that [the task force] did a tremendous job examining all of the key issues and made important recommendations that will better position the forum in the long term.” Keywords United States The Washington, D.C.-based Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’s (FINRA) dispute-resolution task force issued a report on Wednesday recommending that self-regulatory organization (SRO) needs to invest more in its adjudicators and improve the transparency of its decisions. However, the task force could not agree on whether arbitration should remain mandatory. The FINRA task force’s report features 51 recommendations for improving the securities arbitration system. It calls on FINRA to invest more heavily in the arbitrators that hear client/investment industry disputes and to enhance the transparency of the system by routinely producing written explanations for their decisions. State AGs fight for DOL fiduciary rulecenter_img Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media SEC proposes best interest rule Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Congratulations to the 2018 Chancellor’s Employee of the Year Award honorees

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Nov. 7, 2018 The annual Chancellor’s Employee of the Year Award is presented to CU Boulder staff in recognition of and appreciation for exceptional job performance and remarkable contributions to the campus community.Recipients of this distinguished award join a rich heritage of past awardees who display outstanding performance, inspired leadership, extraordinary service to the campus and community and exceptional interpersonal skills. CU Boulder is filled with passionate and dedicated individuals who, day in and day out, shape tomorrow’s leaders, inspire innovation and positively impact humanity. Congratulations to the 2018 award recipients: Rosa Hernandez, Sarah Miller, Jonathan B. Sibray and Sharon Van Boven.The award recipients will be honored at a private reception with Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano and guests. Rosa HernandezHernandez is a custodial supervisor in Housing Facilities Services-Environmental Services. For over 23 years, she has committed to providing and teaching time-honored traditions and skills of custodial work with extraordinary passion. She can often be found working alongside her team members, or by herself, demonstrating the belief that as a leader she should set the example—and she sets the bar high.Throughout her tenure she has led teams in every resident hall on campus, including Family Housing. When her team was recently given the monumental task of ensuring a welcoming, safe and clean environment in the Center for Community, Hernandez instantly began to walk the building and establish a plan. She started her shift early and set to stripping floors, cleaning carpets and scrubbing grout alongside her team. Even when complete, she started the process again because she believed she could “get them a little cleaner for our customers” and that “everything is for our students.” Members of the campus community continuously acknowledge Hernandez and her team for the pride they demonstrate daily in their work.Hernandez is recognized for her “spirit of pure excellence” and is described by those that know her as working with heart and passion day-in and day-out. Those trained and developed by Hernandez are recognized for their ability to demonstrate the highest quality of custodial methods and techniques. Through her extraordinary leadership and mentorship, four members of her frontline team have promoted into leadership roles. She often speaks of her love of the university and students. Perhaps one of her proudest moments in her long career is when her daughter, now a sophomore, became a CU student. Sarah MillerMiller is the assistant dean for diversity and inclusion in the College of Engineering and Applied Science (CEAS). Her extraordinary leadership and vision serve as a model for broadening the participation and inclusion of underrepresented voices in the college, and supporting access to CU for under-supported populations. Highlights of Miller’s impact include: Leading the extraordinary team in the Broadening Opportunity through Leadership and Diversity (BOLD) Center that was honored this year by the Collaborative Network for Engineering and Computing Diversity (CoNECD) as Program of the YearServing as Principal Investigator on a National Science Foundation grant to help improve calculus preparation of prospective transfer students in collaboration with community colleges, and providing new pathways for these students to pursue science, technology, engineering and math education at CU.Expanding the GoldShirt Program to over 50 new students per year, which supports motivated and talented students who need additional math, science or humanities preparation before diving into the full undergraduate engineering curriculum.Creating “Spring Break for Research” which provides early opportunity for undergraduate students to participate in research alongside faculty and graduate studentsMost notably, Miller is recognized for her willingness to take on new challenges and go beyond her day-to-day responsibilities to support teaching and research in STEM education. Jonathan B. SibraySibray is the senior director of information technology in the CU Law School. Described as a change catalyst, he is highly regarded for creating and supporting an environment which encourages individuals to proactively find ways to improve teaching, administrative processes and public engagement through technology. Highlights of Sibray’s technological innovations include: Creating and implementing a secure desktop solution for clinical education programs to solve how students could safely and ethically use personal hardware for clinic-related work given changes in today’s technologyCollaborating with law school admissions to design a data-driven email campaign to provide outreach to underrepresented perspective studentsDeveloping a grading application for faculty to create efficiency in the grading process, and a new course scheduling software that eliminates the need to create course schedules by hand Overseeing the complex technological needs when hosting national and international events, including:The United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues event for the Tenth Anniversary of the Adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Hearings that are being held on campus and for the first time outside of Washington, D.C.Sibray is recognized for his passion in working with others to improve technology literacy. Sharon Van BovenVan Boven is the program coordinator in the Department of Theatre & Dance. She is highly regarded for her ability to understand the big picture while managing the smallest of details.Van Boven served as the primary coordinator for the Northwest Region American College Dance Association (ACDA) festival in early 2018. Held on campus for the first time in more than a decade, the festival drew over 500 students and faculty to CU Boulder. For this extraordinary event, she oversaw a complex schedule of programming that included the creation of five adjudicated concerts, four days of guest artist classes, a faculty reception and the closing gala and dance.Van Boven is described as being warm, gracious and an “ambassador for the arts, our students and CU.” One undergraduate student shared that she “always seems like she actually cares about the students and wants them to succeed.” She is recognized for having an indelible mark on the lives of students, faculty and staff, and for making the day-to-day operations of her department efficient, cooperative and full of mirth. Categories:CelebrateDeadlines & AnnouncementsCampus Communitylast_img read more

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POSTPONED EVENT: Helmut Müller-Sievers honored with 2019 Distinguished Research Lectureship

first_imgPublished: Jan. 13, 2020 • By Chris Yankee Helmut Müller-Sievers, a professor in the Department of German and Slavic Languages and Literature, has been selected to receive the 2019 Distinguished Research Lectureship. The Lectureship is among the most esteemed honors bestowed by the faculty upon a faculty member at the University of Colorado Boulder.Each year, the Research & Innovation Office (RIO) requests nominations from faculty for the Distinguished Research Lectureship, and a faculty review panel recommends one or more faculty members as recipients. About Professor Müller-Sievers  Helmut Müller-Sievers is a professor in the Department of German and Slavic Languages and Literature, and courtesy professor of English and Classics. From 2010—2019, he was Eaton Professor of Humanities and the Director of the Center for Humanities and the Arts. He earned his PhD in German and the Humanities Special Program at Stanford University in 1990, and taught at Northwestern University from 1990—2009, where he was director of the Kaplan Center for the Humanities until 2002, as well as the director of the Program in Comparative Literary Studies until 2006.  Professor Müller-Sievers has held fellowships at the National Humanities Center, the Max-Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, the Institute for Cultural Research in Vienna, the J. Paul Getty Research Institute, and the Kollegforschergruppe BildEvidenz in Berlin. He is the author of five books—most recently The Science of Literature (de Gruyter 2015)—some fifty articles, and has translated three books. About the talk: Engineering Literature: Johann Wolfgang Goethe and the Novel MachineIf you goProfessor Müller-Sievers’ talk: Engineering Literature: Johann Wolfgang Goethe and the Novel MachineTuesday, March 17, 2020 at the CASE Auditorium4 p.m. lecture with reception to follow at about 5 p.m.  RSVP RequestedIn the late 18th century, two phenomena emerged in close proximity: realist novels and autonomous machines. Each claimed to be the other’s opposite: novels, organic products of inspiration that can be enjoyed in a reader’s free time; machines, assemblies of solid parts that transmit motion and perform work. Two new sciences emerged alongside them—hermeneutics as the theory of literary interpretation, and engineering as the theory of building machines—and two new figures stepped onto the cultural stage: the fabulously prolific and wealthy novelist, and the audacious and reckless engineer. In many ways, our present universities are still built around the consequences of this divergence. In this talk, Engineering Literature: Johann Wolfgang Goethe and the Novel Machine, Helmut Müller-Sievers will go back to the origins of this divergence in the late 18th century and show how the concerns of novelists and engineers were once closely aligned—that novels were understood to be machines as much as machines could be subjected to literary interpretation. At the center of his remarks will be the German poet Johann Wolfgang Goethe (1749 – 1832).2020 Distinguished Research Lecture Call for NominationsNominations for the 2020 Distinguished Research Lecture may be submitted from Monday, Feb. 24 – Monday, April 6.The lectureship honors a tenured faculty member, Research Professor (Associate or full) or Adjoint Professor who has been with CU Boulder for at least five years and is widely recognized for a distinguished body of academic or creative achievement and prominence, as well as contributions to the educational and service missions of CU Boulder.Please visit the Distinguished Research Lectureship web pages for detailed information about the lectureship, eligibility and the nomination process. Nominations for the 2020 Distinguished Research Lectureship may be submitted starting Monday, Feb. 24.last_img read more

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First-of-Its-Kind Loyalty Program Rewards Wine Lovers for All Purchases at Wineries,…

first_imgAdvertisementHoliday season offers wine enthusiasts plentiful opportunities to earn Grand Reserve RewardsPASADENA, Calif., November 19, 2019 – Just in time for the busiest wine-buying season of the year, wine lovers who purchase their favorite variety or vintage – regardless of brand – can earn their way to a treasure trove of wine-related rewards – from decanters and wine coolers to a Napa Valley wine tasting trip. The new Grand Reserve Rewards program, which launches today from Vertical Finance, lets wine lovers automatically earn Grand Reserve Rewards points whenever they make purchases at wine-related retailers using an existing credit card. Grand Reserve Rewards points are earned in addition to their card’s current benefits and are redeemable for more than 200 wine-related products and experiences.“Grand Reserve Rewards helps wine enthusiasts take advantage of their passion for wine to get more out of every dollar they spend. We are changing the conversation about loyalty by providing rewards across a wine lover’s purchases, not just for a single wine brand,” says Matthew Goldman, founder and CEO of Vertical Finance. “Wine lovers want to experience new flavor profiles and wine regions, as well as experiment with different producers and sellers. Grand Reserve Rewards satisfies the desire of wine enthusiasts to enjoy all that the wine industry offers, and at the same time accumulate rewards points every time they buy at wineries, wine clubs and wine shops.”Wine lovers can become Grand Reserve Rewards members and start earning points simply by registering for the beta launch at www.grandreserverewards.com and linking an existing credit card. Members then begin earning points immediately on every purchase at wineries, wine clubs and wine shops. Grand Reserve Rewards’ card-linked offer technology tracks and classifies purchases and issues reward points to members on a secure, blockchain-enabled loyalty ledger.Members can explore the expansive Grand Reserve Rewards catalog to redeem points for a wide range of wine-related merchandise and experiences, such as a Sonoma Valley winery tour with a private driver, classes at the Napa Valley Wine Academy, and exclusive sommelier-curated events launching in 2020. To celebrate its debut, Grand Reserve Rewards also announces a distinctive Napa Valley wine country getaway sweepstakes featuring a two-day stay at St. Helena’s enchanting Harvest Inn resort, a two-day, chauffeured concierge wine tasting excursion in the legendary wine region and a $1,500 gift card for transportation expenses.As consumers prepare to toast the season, with its multitude of festivities and gift-giving opportunities, wine sales are poised to soar. According to Nielson, Christmas and New Year are the top two wine-selling holidays followed by Thanksgiving. In fact, Christmas and New Year’s Eve accounted for 69% more dollar sales than the average two-week period in 2016, ringing up more than $1 billion in sales in the two weeks alone*. For wine buyers, there’s no better time to join Grand Reserve Rewards! About Grand Reserve RewardsGrand Reserve Rewards is a breakthrough loyalty program focused on wine lovers. The first-of-its-kind program helps wine lovers earn points for their purchases at wine shops, wine clubs and wineries. The points earned by Grand Reserve Rewards members are redeemed for wine merchandise, experiences and offers. The program is the first loyalty program offered by Vertical Finance, a venture-backed fintech startup based in Pasadena, California. Visit www.grandreserverewards.com to learn more. Terms and conditions apply.*Source: Nielsen, 52 weeks ending December 31, 2016Advertisement Home Industry News Releases First-of-Its-Kind Loyalty Program Rewards Wine Lovers for All Purchases at Wineries, Wine…Industry News ReleasesWine BusinessFirst-of-Its-Kind Loyalty Program Rewards Wine Lovers for All Purchases at Wineries, Wine Clubs and Wine Shops Regardless of BrandBy Press Release – November 21, 2019 390 0 ReddIt Previous articleKobrand Corporation Named Exclusive U.S. Importer for Bodega NortonNext articleVIK Award Scholarship Announced Supporting Institute of Masters of Wine Candidates Press Release Twitter Facebook Linkedin Pinterest Share TAGSConsumerGrand Reserve RewardsVertical Finance Emaillast_img read more

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Bills seek to stem potential costs of prosecution abuse

first_img Jan 17, 2020 By Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Top Stories Bills designed to prevent “cash register” justice when costs of prosecution are included in plea bargains are moving in the House and Senate.SB 846 and HB 461 both advanced during the first week of the 2020 legislative session. The bills limit how costs of prosecution can be imposed in criminal case plea bargains.The Senate Criminal Justice Committee passed SB 846, sponsored by Sen. David Simmons, R-Longwood, on January 14. The next day, the House Subcommittee on Criminal Justice passed HB 461 by Rep. Ramon Alexander, D-Tallahassee.Both Simmons and Alexander said the goal is to prevent prosecutors from adding inflated costs of prosecution charges to plea bargain offers — perhaps in exchange for a reduced sentence, something they said has happened in the past but is not occurring now.“We need some guardrails to ensure in the future this doesn’t happen,” Simmons said. “It’s not happening now, but under the existing language under the law, there could be abuses.”“You cannot achieve equal justice without consistent justice,” Alexander said.The bills as passed set the minimum cost of prosecution in current laws — $50 for misdemeanors and $100 for felonies — as the maximum that could be imposed as part of a plea bargain. However, a judge could impose a higher amount if sufficient evidence is submitted separately from the plea arrangement.That’s a problem for prosecutors, according to 15th Circuit State Attorney Dave Aronberg. He said judges would likely accept the plea bargain terms as the “default,” without imposing higher costs, which could be a financial nightmare for state attorneys.“The reason why we use cost of prosecution so much is because the Legislature between the years of 2007 and 2012 took away [much of] our general revenue and required us to get costs of prosecution,” he said. “This bill takes the minimums [set in statute in plea bargain cases] and makes them the maximum. That guts our budgets.”Aronberg said his office on average imposes $111 on each misdemeanor and $468 on a felony for costs of prosecution and actually collects $100 on misdemeanors and $200 on felonies.He agreed that in the past there had been cases in which state attorneys reduced sentences in exchange for higher costs of prosecution, but said that no longer happens.Tenth Circuit Public Defender Rex Dimmig said, testifying in support of the bill, “There was a time in the 10th Judicial Circuit where you in fact could negotiate a preferred disposition of a case based on a higher cost of prosecution. That is not the case today.”Although that no longer occurs, he said the law is still unfair to defendants.If the state attorney offers a plea deal with a high cost of prosecution figure and the defendant balks, the prosecutor can withdraw the entire deal without the defendant being able to challenge the cost and leaving the defendant no option but to go to trial, Dimmig said.Public defenders are also required to seek to get costs from a defendant, Dimmig said, but the defendant has the right to object to the proposed cost and petition for a judicial hearing to challenge the amount requested.Simmons said he was working with state attorneys to make it easier to get higher costs but still require judicial review.Rep. James Grant, R-Tampa, chair of the House Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, said there are two issues for lawmakers. One is the financial impact on state attorneys and not “kneecapping” them in legitimate attempts to recover prosecution costs. The second, he said, is a perception that a defendant could agree to pay a high cost of prosecution in exchange for a lowered sentence.“If a single state attorney or assistant state attorney in the state of Florida is making contingent a plea deal on someone willing to accept an amount of money, that is nothing more than or nothing less than extortion or bribery with a badge,” Grant said. “Perhaps it’s not happening today, but I do think we can get to a place where we ensure it’s not happening in the future again.”In the House meeting, Rep. Juan Fernandez-Barquin, R-Miami, suggested that the proposed bills should only apply to defendants represented by public defenders. During the Senate session, Sen. Jason Pizzo, D-Miami, asked whether the changes would make it harder for prosecutors to recover costs in expensive white collar and fraud cases. Dimmig replied the intent is for the final bill to allow those higher costs to be imposed with the defendant having the option of an evidentiary review, which he predicted would be rarely used.The Senate Criminal Justice Committee passed SB 846 4-1, with Pizzo casting the negative vote. It next goes to the Appropriations Subcommittee on Criminal and Civil Justice and then the full Appropriations Committee.HB 461 passed 15-0. It next goes to the Justice Appropriations Subcommittee and then the Judiciary Committee. Bills seek to stem potential costs of prosecution abuselast_img read more

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MTS CEO talks about Telekom Srbija bid – report

first_img MTS chief backs open, local infrastructure drive Kavit Majithia MTSTelekom Srbija Devices AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 20 AUG 2015 Home MTS CEO talks about Telekom Srbija bid – report Kavit joined Mobile World Live in May 2015 as Content Editor. He started his journalism career at the Press Association before joining Euromoney’s graduate scheme in April 2010. Read More >> Read more Relatedcenter_img MTS readies first mmWave phone for Russia Vodafone, MTS extend partnership to 2023 Tags Previous ArticleGoogle intros Android M SDKNext ArticlePaytm looks to Chinese commerce model – report Author Russia’s MTS confirmed it is bidding for the Serbian government’s 58 per cent stake in Telekom Srbija.According to Russian news agency Tass, MTS’ CEO Andrei Dubovskov said the operator “might be interested in taking over Telekom Srbija”, before adding it would need to “analyse the deal thoroughly to see if it would be profitable for us”.“Our interest, of course, also depends on the potential costs,” he added.The Serbian government confirmed this week all eight bidders that submitted non-binding offers for the stake before the 2 August deadline had made it through to the next stage of the process.Along with MTS, Deutsche Telekom, Telekom Slovenije, Bulgaria’s Vivacom, and a host of private equity firms remain in the running to acquire the stake.The list, however does not include Telekom Austria, which was also rumoured to be interested, after a failed €1.1 billion bid back in 2011 for the operator.This week the America Movil-backed operator reportedly ruled itself out of the process.Serbia’s prime minister was quoted as saying the government will not sell the company if it does not receive a “significantly higher offer” than Telekom Austria’s bid four years ago.MTS this week announced a Q2 revenue rise in its quarterly results thanks to domestic adoption of data services and a surge in handset sales, but saw profitability hit heavily by the Russian conflict in Ukraine, its second largest market.last_img read more

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Telefonica talks up the positives after mixed Q1

first_img Telefonica saw its Q1 figures negatively impacted by foreign exchange issues around its Latin American operations, but talked up positive indicators for its business.Jose Maria Alvarez-Pallete, newly-installed executive chairman of Telefonica, said that “in a context of intense technological disruption and transformation, our first quarter results reflected a strengthening of the business across the board and of the capacity of our platforms which is enabling us to reach more customers with higher value products and services”.A particular highlight for the company was a return to OIBDA growth in Spain, meaning it saw growth at this level across all operating businesses.But the company made little reference to its planned sale of its UK business to CK Hutchison, against a growing expectation that European regulators may move to block the deal. It did note positives from the operation including cash flow growth resulting from OIBDA improvements.On a group level, the company reported a profit for the period of €776 million, down from €1.8 billion last year, on revenue of €10.78 billion, down 6.6 per cent.It said that last year the bottom line benefitted from a “non-recurrent positive financial impact” related to the ongoing O2 UK sales process: excluding this, net profit for the quarter rose by 26 per cent.On an operating level (OIBDA), this year’s €3.38 billion was down 6.7 per cent year-on-year, which was attributed to currency rate changes related to Telefonica’s Latin America operations. On an organic basis, OIBDA increased by 5.5 per cent.On an organic basis, revenue increased by 3.4 per cent. Again, the reported number was impacted by foreign exchange issues.Telefonica ended the period with 246.85 million mobile connections, down 2.3 per cent year-on-year, with drops in the prepaid base partially offset by growth in more lucrative contract subscribers.Its LTE customer base (35.6 million) represented 15 percent of the total connections, up 9 points.Mobile data revenue grew 19.9 per cent year-on-year on an organic basis, to represent 48 per cent of mobile service revenue, which was attributed to higher smartphone penetration and growing LTE take-up. Telefonica Related Author Home Telefonica talks up the positives after mixed Q1 Tags Telefónica refuerza la seguridad de las cadenas de bloques Steve works across all of Mobile World Live’s channels and played a lead role in the launch and ongoing success of our apps and devices services. He has been a journalist…More Read more center_img Steve Costello Telefonica bolsters blockchain security Luz verde a la fusión entre Telefónica y Liberty Global en el Reino Unido Previous ArticleTelenor’s CFO, general counsel resign over VimpelCom caseNext ArticleRising costs squeeze China Telecom’s Q1 profit Español AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 29 APR 2016 last_img read more

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Evergreen Man Convicted of Killing Toddler Sentenced to 40 Years in Prison

first_imgThe Evergreen man convicted of killing his girlfriend’s 2-year-old son was sentenced to 40 years at the Montana State Prison.Brandon Walter Lee Newberry was sentenced Tuesday at an emotional hearing in Flathead County District Court. The hearing came more than a year after Newberry was charged with homicide following the death of 2-year-old Forrest Groshelle.During the 90-minute hearing, Newberry’s attorneys offered testimony showing the 22-year-old had a troubled upbringing and suffered from social anxiety, depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. But the family of the young victim said Newberry should have known that beating a child was wrong, regardless of his struggles.According to court documents, Newberry was watching Groshelle on a daily basis in January and February 2015 while the boy’s mother, Takara Juntunen, was at work. Groshelle died on Feb. 17 after vomiting for a few days. When police arrived at the home, they found bruising, scratching and abrasions on the boy’s body. An autopsy revealed Groshelle had been hit multiple times in the abdomen, causing a laceration of the small intestine that slowly poisoned the boy. During an interview with law enforcement, Newberry told them in the days before Groshelle’s death he had been “roughhousing” with the child.Newberry was charged with deliberate homicide soon after and initially denied the allegations. In February 2016, Newberry pleaded Alford to an amended charge of mitigated deliberate homicide. An Alford plea occurs when a defendant does not admit guilt but acknowledges that the prosecution has enough evidence that, if presented to a jury, would likely result in a conviction.At Tuesday’s sentencing, the court heard testimony from Groshelle’s grandmother and aunt. Cindy Juntunen talked about her grandson’s early health struggles and how much joy Groshelle brought to the family.“It doesn’t matter if you have anxiety or if you’re on drugs, how could you hurt a child,” Juntunen said. “All Forrest ever wanted was to be loved and you betrayed him by killing him.”Groshelle’s aunt, Kayla Johnson, talked about her early interactions with Newberry, who only dated Takara Juntunen for three months before Groshelle died. Johnson said Newberry was an angry man who once assaulted her during an argument. She also testified she saw Newberry lock Groshelle in a room when the boy misbehaved and on another occasion sat on him. Johnson said in the weeks prior to Groshelle’s death, Takara Juntunen found bruises on the boy but Newberry said the toddler had fallen.Johnson told Judge Heidi Ulbricht she hoped Newberry would receive the maximum punishment possible.“You are a vicious monster and for the sake of your own son and all the other children I hope you never get out of prison, Brandon,” Johnson said. “If it were up to me, you would get the death sentence because that is the sentence you gave to Forrest.”Following her testimony, Johnson refused to answer any questions from Newberry’s attorneys during cross-examination.Newberry’s public defenders then offered testimony about Newberry’s untreated mental health issues. Dr. Andrea Weisman, a psychologist and consultant from Washington, D.C. who evaluated Newberry, said the defendant suffered from social anxiety, depression and untreated attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. She said Newberry did not have a stable upbringing, his parents were not around often and he often had to care for his younger siblings.“The combination of his depression, his social anxiety and his untreated attention deficit hyperactivity disorder created a psychological tsunami,” she said. “He could not form rational or intelligent decisions at the time of the incident.”Newberry’s aunt, Teresa Newberry, testified that her nephew struggled with drugs and was never able to get the help he needed.“Brandon’s upbringing was less than ideal,” she said. “Forrest is not the only one who was failed.”After the testimony, County Attorney Ed Corrigan and Deputy County Attorney Andrew Clegg recommended that Newberry be sentenced to the Montana State Prison for 40 years with no restriction on parole. Newberry’s attorneys, Vicki Frazier and Greg Rapkoch, agreed with the recommendation and said Montana State Prison in Deer Lodge could offer the treatment their client needed.Prior to handing down her sentence, Judge Ulbricht asked Newberry if there was anything he wanted to say.“I am more than sorry for what happened and I want the family to know that this will be with me for the rest of my life,” he said.Ulbricht noted Newberry’s crime “shook the community to its core” before sentencing him to 40 years in prison with no restrictions on parole. Newberry was given credit for 427 days served. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Emaillast_img read more

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Uncovering Asia: The Second Asian Investigative Journalism Conference in Nepal

first_img Tweet Pocket Deadline: 15 May 2016Open to: working professional journalists in developing and transitioning countries in AsiaVenue: 23-25 September 2016, Kathmandu, NepalDescriptionThe Uncovering Asia conference will take place from 23 – 25 September 2016 in Kathmandu, Nepal. For the three-day conference they are bringing together an extraordinary group of top investigative reporters, data journalists, and media law and security experts from across Asia and around the world. The conferences, are organized every two years, are well-known for focusing on hands-on, practical skills and training. This is a unique chance to up your game and learn from the best in the business.More than 30 fellowships are available both for established and young promising journalists with at least three years of experience. Applicants must have demonstrated experience in investigative or data journalism.Ten fellowships are reserved for data journalists. Another five fellowships are available for those engaged in cutting-edge investigative techniques and production, including use of 360 video, drones, sensors and multimedia.EligibilityWorking professional journalists in developing and transitioning countries in Asia can apply for a fellowship. Applicants must be able to communicate in and understand English, as this will be the main language of the conference.CostsThe Uncovering Asia Fellowships include:Round-trip airfare to Kathmandu, Nepal;Hotel room for three nights;Conference registration fee;Breakfasts, lunches, and a banquet dinner.How to apply?In order to apply you should fill in the online application form latest by 15 May 2016.For more information please visit the official website. Share 0 CMU Australia Scholarships for International Students Reddit Similar Stories April 13, 2016 Published by Gorica LinkedIn 0center_img +1 Uncovering Asia: The Second Asian Investigative Journalism Conference in Nepal AAI One World Scholarship Program for Students from Developing Countries in Austria ZUKOnnect Fellowships for Scholars from Africa, Asia and Latin America Leave a Reply Cancel ReplyYou must be logged in to post a comment. ← STERN Grant Scholarship for Young Photojournalists Confintea Fellowship Programme by UNESCO →last_img read more

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