This month in Harvard history

first_imgJune 1913 — Having proved itself during a five-year experimental period, the Business School emerges from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences to become an independent graduate school.June 21, 1927 — The Fogg Museum formally opens its new quarters on Quincy St. A large-scale special-loan exhibition features the College’s early silver collection, Maya art from the Peabody Museum, illuminated manuscripts, paintings, drawings, tapestries, furniture, ivories, enamels, and other objects.June 1940 — The Radcliffe Board of Trustees authorizes the use of Radcliffe dormitories for temporarily housing European refugee children.June 12, 1953 — The Business School dedicates two halls: Aldrich (13 classrooms) and Kresge (dining facilities, student center, meeting rooms).June 2, 1954 — Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie visits Harvard. Selassie signs the University guest book, visits Houghton Library to inspect rare books and manuscripts with Ethiopian connections, and takes a short tour around the University.June 15, 1954 — The Gordon McKay Laboratory of Applied Science is dedicated.June 22, 1957 — After a six-year break, Harvard-Yale and Oxford-Cambridge teams hold their 17th track meet at Harvard Stadium. The transatlantic track rivalry dates from 1899.Ca. June 1961 — Harvard announces that its new office building and health center on Mount Auburn St. will bear the name Holyoke Center, in honor of Edward Holyoke, Harvard’s ninth President.last_img read more

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Newsmakers

first_imgLown, ProCor grant inaugural Heart Hero Award ProCor, a global communication program promoting heart health founded by Harvard School of Public Health Professor of Cardiology Emeritus Bernard Lown, has granted its first Louise Lown Heart Hero Award to the Heart and Stroke Foundation’s Children’s Programme. The winning project, based in Cape Town, South Africa, helps young children from impoverished settings develop heart-healthy habits by engaging them in activities such as growing vegetables for their daily meals.Named in honor of Lown’s wife, a social worker, activist, and writer, the new award recognizes innovative, preventive approaches to cardiovascular health in developing countries and other low-resource settings. An award ceremony was recently held at the Nosizwe Educare in Khayelitsha, one of the Cape Town crèches currently benefiting from the Children’s Programme. Teachers, program officials, and children were all in attendance. Lindbergh Grant awarded to OEB Professor Peter GirguisThe Lindbergh Foundation recently named Assistant Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Peter Girguis one its 14 Lindbergh Grant recipients for 2007. Girguis received the $10,580 grant — a symbolic amount representing the cost of building Charles Lindbergh’s plane in 1927 — for his project titled “Developing Microbial Fuel Cells from Soil for Lighting and Power in Rural Areas of the World.”Girguis plans to develop low-cost microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to produce high-efficiency lighting for people living in rural regions of developing countries. Using an electrode and a bucket of soil, compost, food scraps, or other naturally occurring sediments, energy could be harvested to generate 1 volt of electricity for up to 18 hours.The Lindbergh Foundation is a public nonprofit organization based in Minnesota that supports innovations that foster the environment.last_img read more

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New club addresses major health issues in America

first_imgJunior Jean Llenos said he wanted to bridge the gap between the scientific community and the general public. So when he learned that The Health Guardians of America was looking to found a chapter at Notre Dame, he submitted an application to be the club’s founding president.“Science is very important,” he said. “We need people who make scientific breakthroughs. They save lives, but for me personally, [medicine] has been a lot more about the people because [one of] the biggest problems in medicine today, among many other things, is that we have such a disconnect between what the scientific community knows is good for people and how that information is given to the public.”The Health Guardians of America is a national organization originally founded in California that aims to address America’s health issues, with a particular focus on heart disease, obesity and diabetes. Llenos said the organization’s founder reaches out to universities’ pre-health programs and invites students to apply to found a chapter.“Everything that we do is coordinated between the chapters, and then the results of all the chapters are kind of compiled in order to see what works on a really large scale,” Llenos said. “So this is about implementing very scalable and measurable interventions for health on a global scale”.Senior Meghan Cohoon, the club’s vice president of external relations, said she was drawn to the club because she enjoys teaching people about how their lifestyles can impact their health.“I’ve always had a profound interest in and passion for teaching people that their lifestyle choices have effects on their resulting health conditions and that making healthier changes can often be more effective in addressing one’s well-being than necessarily taking a plethora of medications, [though] obviously, not in all cases,” she said in an email.As one of its main initiatives, the club is implementing a program, “FitlifeFlow,” to incentivize exercise, Cohoon said. The program is part of a nationwide initiative and allows students to earn money by consistently exercising.“As a college student, I know how easy it can be to push one’s health and fitness to the back burner as academics take over our lives,” she said. “Yet, with our program, ‘FitlifeFlow,’ we hope to help students find a better balance between academia, health, fitness and [maintaining] a social life.”One of the club’s other initiatives will focus on nutrition and healthier options in the dining halls, Llenos said.“Looking forward, one of the things I personally want to do while I’m president is get more of an interaction between the student body and the dining halls,” he said. “ … Exercise is important, but diet is 100 times more important when it comes to regulating health than exercise is.”The organization is unique in that it does not have a general membership, Llenos said, and each member is involved with a specific project. Students must submit a resume and undergo an interview process in order to join the organization.“If you’re a member of the club, you’re assigned a role,” he said. “ … If you’re part of the club, you will have a lot more independence and a lot more direct impact on something, especially in a relatively quicker amount of time than you would with another club.”Tags: club, Health Guardians of America, sciencelast_img read more

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Huge Goodyear development includes city hall, library, park, office space

first_imgThe city of Goodyear is taking the first steps to build a first-of-its-kind project. This week, the Goodyear City Council approved a letter of intent to enter into a public-private partnership with Globe Corporation to begin the project which is expected to be completed by mid-2022. Goodyear Civic Square at Estrella Falls is a long-awaited project that will serve as a highly-desirable community gathering spot for events such as festivals, concerts, and parades – creating a true sense of community. It will also create the daytime density needed to spur future development including new restaurants, retail and entertainment.“Goodyear has envisioned a city hall project like this for decades,” said Mayor Georgia Lord. “Our current city hall, which requires future funding for reinvestment and expansion, was meant to be temporary. As Goodyear grows faster than ever before, now is the time to invest in our city’s future through this much-needed project.”Civic Square will be located north of McDowell Road and west of Harkins Theater near 150th Drive. Plans include several amenities including a city hall, library, two-acre park/gathering place, and upscale Class A office space. “This is an important milestone for the city’s future growth,” said Lori Gary, Goodyear’s Economic Development Director. “Class A office space is lacking in the West Valley limiting our ability to vie for these desirable office projects. Goodyear will now be able to compete to attract high-end office users, which will bring even more high-quality jobs to the area.” Globe Corporation owns 47 acres where the new Civic Square will be built. They are donating some of the land to Goodyear for this project.“We’re excited to enter into this public-private partnership with Goodyear,” said Mike Olsen, Globe Corporation Chief Financial Officer. “We know the Goodyear community has been asking for this type of mixed-use space for years and we’re confident this project will be the catalyst to activate the area to bring in new office, residential, restaurants and other retail options.” Civic Square is in its early conceptual phase. More details, as this project moves forward, will be available this summer.  To view the council presentation, click this link: http://goodyear.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=8&clip_id=3135last_img read more

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Small islands, champions of sustainability

first_imgIn Zlarin, from this Friday 01.07.2016. in the Vesna Parun Homeland Museum, starting at 20:30 pm, an international traveling exhibition of photographs of small sustainable islands around the world is being held.Since 2014, the Small Sustainable Islands initiative, with the support of the Conservatoire du Littoral, has been developed with the aim of encouraging dialogue between participants working on a daily basis to protect the islands and valorise their actions: local associations, authorities, protected area managers, businesses… In this context, the annual CELEBRATE ISLANDS celebration offers an opportunity to express the uniqueness for which they unite people in their environment. This is the first major step towards creating an international solidarity community of small islands oriented towards sustainable development.Ultimately, the Small Sustainable Islands Initiative will help create a broad network of exchange of experiences and good practices, encourage and reward local efforts by its members, including through the Small Sustainable Island label.The small islands are fragile and unique. They are at the forefront of global change, these are the first areas and places of innovation, which are constantly renewed due to their own sustainable development. Recycling waste, conserving water resources, promoting renewable energy, protecting biodiversity, valorizing cultural heritage… more than just a call to travel, this exhibition highlights the concrete actions of more than 30 small islands around the world for the challenges of tomorrow. The traveling exhibition, organized by the Conservatoire du littoral and their partners as part of the third edition of CELEBRATE ISLANDS, has already been presented in France, Spain, Tunisia and Mozambique, and now in Croatia.By organizing this photo exhibition, cooperation was established Zlarin Tourist Board and Kud Koralj and MIC-Vis (international multidisciplinary scientific conference organized jointly by VERN ‘Polytechnic and Ivo Pilar Institute of Social Sciences under the auspices of the City of Vis) with Conservatoire du littoral and laid the foundations for future cooperation which can emphasize the importance of natural and cultural sights , and the need for sustainable management of island areas in order to preserve their heritage.The Conservatory of Littoral Founded 41 years ago, the Conservatoire du littoral (Coastal Protection Agency) is a public institution for the protection of the coastal area through the purchase of land in mainland France and French overseas estates and through technical and institutional cooperation abroad. For more than 10 years, she has led projects specifically dedicated to small islands, monitored and supported local associations, protected areas and governments in their small island planning and management policies and operations. The Conservatoire du littoral provides international support to civil society organizations in the protection of the island’s heritage.last_img read more

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Nikola Motor Company and Bosch to develop H2-electric truck

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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A difference of emphasis

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Invest in aviation infrastructure

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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UK right not to adopt EU justice measure, Lords committee says

first_imgEuropean Union laws setting minimum rights for defendants and victims are in the interests of British citizens, but the government was right not to sign up to a Lisbon treaty proposal guaranteeing suspects access to a lawyer, a committee of peers has said. The Lords Justice and Institutions EU sub-committee reported this week: ‘There are legitimate concerns that EU citizens who find themselves involved in the criminal justice system of another member state, either as defendants or victims of crime, are disadvantaged.’ British citizens, who are ‘accustomed to high standards of legal protection at home’, may find themselves with fewer rights than they would expect in their own country, the report says. The report follows the committee’s enquiry into the growing body of EU criminal justice legislation and its likely effect on British citizens, during which it heard evidence from the Law Society and the Bar Council. It found: ‘There is a widespread perception that the development of cross-border law enforcement measures has not been matched by balancing measures to ensure the rights of those defendants and victims involved.’ To date, it said, the EU legislative effort has prioritised law enforcement, with a focus on facilitating mutual recognition – so that decisions made by the judicial authorities of member states are given effect by the judicial authorities of another. The committee welcomed the 2009 Lisbon treaty, which put in place ‘road maps’ of planned legislation to secure defendants and victims rights, It says such road maps are the best way to protect British people from possible legal problems abroad and recommends that the government take a positive approach to opting in to such EU legislation. However, it accepts that there are problems in incorporating the rules into the UK’s criminal law systems and agrees with the government that the proposal for access to a lawyer in the current road map proposal would be ‘too disruptive for the UK criminal justice systems’, supporting its decision not to opt in. But the committee hopes the outcome of the negotiations on the directive would be legislation that the UK could opt in to. It concludes that the government should continue to look favourably in principle at opting in to further road map legislation, bearing in mind particularly the influence that the UK can have in raising standards across the EU. But it recommends that, before the European Commission expands its criminal justice policy, the road map legislation should be put in place and its impact assessed. Committee chair Lord Bowness said: ‘Significant EU law enforcement legislation such as the European arrest warrant now needs to be complemented by measures protecting European citizens. ‘By establishing minimum legal rights for both defendants and victims, regardless of which EU member state they are from, we can ensure that British citizens are guaranteed a high level of care and protection, regardless of where they might find themselves in trouble,’ he said. ‘However, we recognise that EU legislation could easily cause significant problems as member states have such diverse national laws. To protect against this, we recommend that the minimum rights set at EU level should be firmly grounded in the European Court of Human Rights and other international law norms.’ A Law Society spokeswoman said the Society supports the principle of improving procedural rights provision in criminal proceedings across the EU and supports the current initiative for a directive on the right of access to a lawyer. Head of policy at Fair Trials International Catherine Heard, said: ‘We are delighted that this report sees a clear need for safeguards to be built into EU law for basic rights like access to an interpreter and a lawyer, which are fundamental to a fair trial but are sadly under-protected in many EU countries. ‘This report echoes what Fair Trials International has been saying for years – prosecution measures like the European arrest warrant have been prioritised, at the expense of these crucial defence rights.’ She added ‘The UK must work with its EU partners to get these safeguards right, or more cases of injustice will follow.’last_img read more

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Don’t leave trainees hanging on, law firms told

first_imgLaw firms should tell trainee solicitors whether or not they intend to hire them at least two months before their expected qualification date, the Law Society has said, responding to concerns that some employers were waiting until the last moment before telling trainees of their fate.The guidance was published after the Law Society’s Junior Lawyers Division (JLD), which represents around 70,000 trainees and junior solicitors, asked the Society to raise the issue with employers.’The JLD is aware that some employers are failing to let their trainees know whether they will be offered a newly qualified position until the last moment, resulting in a number of newly qualified solicitors finding themselves unemployed, without a sufficient notice period to enable them to secure a position elsewhere,’  the JLD said. ’Furthermore, some employers are even unwilling to let their trainees know when they will be in a position to make a decision when asked.’According to the guidance, published today, law firms should ‘as a matter of good practice’:Inform a trainee no later than 12 weeks prior to the expected admission date of a time at which they can expect to be told of their employer’s decision.Inform a trainee no later than eight weeks prior to their expected admission date what that decision is.The guidance adds that, if an employer is unable to provide the information, it should say so, providing reasonable information as to why it is not possible. Adele Edwin-Lamerton, JLDAdele Edwin-Lamerton, JLD chair, said the guidance would give trainees the opportunity to plan for the future. As it stands trainees could be a situation where they are unsure of their position and may look for other opportunities, only to be told they would not be taken on by their employer for a perceived lack of loyalty, she said.She added that firms would also be able to use the guidance to manage their upcoming trainee intakes for March. Last year, then JLD chair Bryan Scant said some firms were leaving trainees ‘in limbo’ by failing to tell them until the last minute whether or not they would be retained.last_img read more

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