Fairbanks mayor says Eielson’s F-35s will save the borough’s economic bacon

first_imgEconomy | Interior | MilitaryFairbanks mayor says Eielson’s F-35s will save the borough’s economic baconOctober 20, 2017 by Tim Ellis, KUAC Share:354th Fighter Wing Commander Col. David Mineau, left, and Fairbanks North Star Borough Mayor Karl Kassel prepare to fly in one of the F-16s at Eielson Air Force Base in October 2017. (Photo by Isaac Johnson/354th FW public affairs)Fairbanks North Star Borough Mayor Karl Kassel said the buildup associated with two squadrons of F-35 warplanes that’ll be coming to Eielson Air Force Base in a couple of years will offset decreases in population and state funding that are both being driven by Alaska’s recession-wracked economy.In better times, Kassel might be crowing about an expansion of the Fairbanks area’s economy that would be driven by half a billion dollars in construction and 5,000 new people who are expected to be drawn here by the F-35s. Instead, the mayor said he’s just glad that the economic benefits will basically just enable the area to hold its own.“So, it’s huge for all of us in the borough,” Kassel said, “and it’s helping save our bacon so to speak with the changing economy and what’s going on in the state.”What’s going on statewide is a continuation of the economic slowdown that’s been under way for more than three years now caused by plummeting oil prices and a corresponding free-fall of state revenues that come from the industry. According to the state Department of Labor and Workforce Development, Alaska’s unemployment rate in August stood at 6.3 percent. In the borough, it was 5.5 percent. Statewide job growth, wage growth, GDP growth and home prices were all down by more than two percentage points in August from the 10-year average.So Kassel said the near-term prospect of slow or no growth of the borough’s economy doesn’t sound too bad.“We’re going to see our economy stay comparatively flat,” Kassel said. “While the rest of the state is going to be taking a pretty good hit.”Kassel took a few minutes away from schmoozing during Tuesday’s F-35 celebration of sorts at Eielson to explain studies that suggest most of the 5,000 people coming to the area with the warplanes also will likely offset a decrease in the Fairbanks-area population that’s largely due to cuts in funding for state agencies and the University of Alaska Fairbanks.“We have also been quantifying the exodus from Fairbanks as a result of cuts at the university (and) state cuts,” Kassel said. “There’s been a number of those that are resulting in people leaving Fairbanks now.”Kassel said most of the new residents probably will find homes on the city’s east side, closer to Eielson, while much of the population loss likely will occur on the west side, around the university.Share this story:last_img read more

Read More »

News / Ripples from Yantian port delays building to ‘unprecedented’ supply chain disruption

first_img Shippers are facing a perfect storm as the logistics industry has entered an “an era of unprecedented disruption”, with ports crippled by acute congestion as the malaise faced by China’s Yantian spreads to others.The delays to Chinese exports, which have escalated to 16 days or more for vessels not cancelling their Yantian call, threatens an impact significantly worse than March’s Suez Canal blockage.According to Alex Hersham, CEO and co-founder of supply chain technology company Zencargo, the knock-on effect from Yantian, which has been operating at just 20% of normal productivity due to an outbreak of positive Covid-19 cases, will be acutely felt in the coming weeks by retailers and consumers.“Container shortages and delays will severely impact companies’ ability to deliver to customers,” said Mr Hersham.And he warned that industries “will face shortages of materials, and countries will struggle to stock up on PPE”, and also claimed “we are in an era of unprecedented supply chain disruption”.Ocean carriers are scrambling to mitigate the impact, Maersk, for example, confirming the omission of Yantian on 11 of its services and ad-hoc cancellations on eight others.The carrier said the Yantian port authority had successfully re-opened part of the port, moving productivity back to around 45% of normal, but this was far from sufficient.It told customers: “While this has a positive impact on gate activity, which is soon expected to reach the same levels as before the incident, schedule reliability will continue to suffer with an average waiting time of 16 days and counting.”As and when the pent-up export cargo does move, this huge wave of cargo hitting European and US ports will be extremely challenging for them and their already stretched landside operations.In the US, ports struggle to cope with peaks more than their European counterparts, but the North Europe port of Hamburg has been under intense pressure in the past few weeks and today Hapag-Lloyd advised customers of a tightening of restrictions for export cargo deliveries at Antwerp.An advisory from the carrier said terminal operator PSA Antwerp had been “forced” to implement a “seven-day cargo opening rule” for export containers to its terminals, meaning shippers would henceforth not be allowed to deliver containers to the quay more than seven days before the confirmed arrival date of the nominated vessel.Speaking to The Loadstar today Mr Hersham said carriers could decide to omit the UK to mitigate the impact on their schedules.“Congestion will rise significantly, meaning that ports, and especially those already suffering such as Felixstowe, will be heavily impacted,” he said. “The scale of the issue in South China is already bigger than Suez.“Two accurate metrics to measure disruption by are days of delay and teu; in both cases, Yantian far surpasses what happened with the Ever Given.” By Mike Wackett 14/06/2021last_img read more

Read More »

Family finds Florida teen in bathroom after he wanders into wrong house

first_imgWATCH: Lehigh teen flees police through crowded Florida park in stolen car February 23, 2021 Punta Gorda woman accused of raping teen next to 12-year-old at birthday party May 18, 2021 Advertisement NAPLES, Fla. – A Florida teen was caught in the bathroom of an East Naples home Sunday after mistaking the home for his ex-girlfriend’s, according to the Collier County Sheriff’s Office. Alan Osorio-Martinez, 18, of Naples, was found in the bathroom of a home on Tamiami Trail when a woman who was getting ready to take a shower discovered him, according to the arrest report. The woman asked Osorio-Martinez who he was when the 18-year-old responded saying he was at the wrong house. He then hid in the bathtub, witnesses told deputies. The woman’s boyfriend threw Osorio-Martinez out of the house and authorities were called. AdvertisementTags: Teentrespass Osorio-Martinez is facing a trespassing charge. Florida teen to serve 45 years for killing mother over argument about grades December 10, 2020 TikTok teen who stabbed neighbor for fame arrested in Fort Myers February 5, 2021 AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments AdvertisementDeputies discovered the teen did have texts from an ex-girlfriend saying she was leaving a door open for him. Coincidentally, the home Osorio-Martinez entered had a front door that did not close all the way due to construction on the frame, according to the woman living at the home. Deputies said due to the teen’s statements it was determined he did not intend to commit a burglary. AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Advertisement RELATEDTOPICSlast_img read more

Read More »

FiftySeven Boutique and Gift Emporium launch new Online Store

first_imgSEE ALSO – Check out the Fifty Seven Boutique and Gift Emporium Online Store FiftySeven Boutique and Gift Emporium launch new Online Store Pinterest Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest TAGSFifty Seven Boutique Twitter Electric Picnic Bizarre situation as Ben Brennan breaks up Fianna Fáil-Fine Gael arrangement to take Graiguecullen-Portarlington vice-chair role By LaoisToday Reporter – 24th April 2020 Twittercenter_img Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date WhatsApp Previous articleNow is a good time to review your Life Cover with Peavoy Financial PlanningNext articleDeaths in Laois – Friday, April 24, 2020 LaoisToday Reporter FiftySeven Boutique and Gift Emporium have launched their new Online Store.With stores in Portarlington, Athy and Durrow, the online outlet is the latest development to this Laois business.With all three stores now closed due to the current outbreak of Covid 19, people have an opportunity to shop a selection of FiftySeven collection while staying safe at home.Shopping with FiftySeven not only allows you support your local business, but Mary and Jenny Miller have long understood the value and importance of stocking from Irish owned companies.As a result a large proportion of the stock available in FiftySeven Boutique, is Irish made, Irish designed or is purchased from other Irish owned companies. This is something that supports a whole host of other jobs in our economy, and is more important in today’s economy than ever.FiftySeven’s Online store currently has an impressive range of products available now, from gorgeous gifts for a new baby, jigsaws and clothing for the younger members of our family, quality candles to lift our spirits, something new for our homes or a simple selection of greeting cards from their boutique range, there really is something for everyone.Fifty Seven Boutique and Gift Emporium is one of Laois’s finest shops, stocking some of the best products on the market in the clothing and giftware sectors.We are all looking forward to the bright days ahead when we can visit one of their beautiful stores again, Until then, check out their fabulous new website here, with new product ranges added daily. Electric Picnic WhatsApp Home Sponsored FiftySeven Boutique and Gift Emporium launch new Online Store Sponsored Laois Councillor ‘amazed’ at Electric Picnic decision to apply for later date for 2021 festival Facebook News last_img read more

Read More »

Hwang Sun Charged for Pro-North Activity

first_img SHARE Hwang Sun Charged for Pro-North Activity News By Daily NK – 2015.02.12 1:06pm Facebook Twitter On February 10th, the Seoul Central District Prosecutor’s Office indicted Hwang Sun [41, female] for violating National Security Law. Hwang has beenheld in custody since last month. According to the prosecution, Hwang isbeing charged for allegedly praising and idolizing the North Koreanregime at her event, “Hwang Sun – Shin Eun Mi TalkConcert”, that took place at the Jogyesa Temple lastNovember. While this so-called “pro-North lecture” raised a lot of controversy, Hwang’spartner, Shin Eun Mi, was also charged, but her indictment was suspended on the8th of last month. Shin was then deported to the US. Hwang had been investigated under thecharges of allegedly working as a pro-North activist for the group, “Practical Implementation of the South-North Joint Declaration”, praising the North Korean regime, and promoting editorialspublished by North Korea’s Party-run publication,Rodong Sinmun, through her “Sovereignty BroadcastingChannel” online. Prosecutors say Hwang wrote pro-Northstatements in her blogs and emails, such as referencing “PremierKim Il Sung’s achievements”.She is also being charged for possession of the book, Laughter Through Hardship, which was published in North Korea. North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with China There are signs that North Korea is running into serious difficulties with its corn harvest center_img News Entire border patrol unit in North Hamgyong Province placed into quarantine following “paratyphoid” outbreak News News RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR AvatarDaily NKQuestions or comments about this article? Contact us at [email protected] last_img read more

Read More »

OUR Grants NWC 30-Day Suspension Of Quality Of Service Standards

first_imgRelatedOUR Grants NWC 30-Day Suspension Of Quality Of Service Standards Advertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Office of Utilities Regulation (OUR) has granted the National Water Commission (NWC) a 30-day suspension of the Quality of Service Standards, thus relieving the company of obligations to comply and compensate customers for breaches in service quality caused by damage and other uncontrollable factors related to Hurricane Dean.The standards were suspended due to ‘Force Majeure’ or exceptional conditions, which have affected the quality of the water and sewerage services the NWC offers its customers.According to a gazetted notice in the newspapers on Wednesday (Aug. 29), the suspension was approved by OUR Director General, J. Paul Morgan who “granted a 30-day suspension, effective August 19, 2007, of NWC’s obligation to comply with Quality of Service Standards as outlined in Document No WAT 2004.01.1,” based on an application submitted by the NWC.The suspension covers the period August 19 to September 17, but Chief of Water and Transport Regulations at the OUR, Marie James in an interview with JIS News, said the situation would be reviewed this weekend.“We actually asked for a restoration plan. We’re presently reviewing it, and by the end of the week, the Communication Department should put something out. What we are doing is, we’re collating all the information from all the providers in the water and sewerage sectors… we’re going to put out a general statement on what the status is and when full service is expected to be restored.by weekend,” she said.Explaining the suspension, Miss James informed that both the Overall Standards and the Guaranteed Standards schemes have been suspended. The Quality of Service Scheme for the National Water Commission sets out overall standards, which identify performance measures for water quality, water pressure, reliability of supply, sewerage effluent quality and change of water meter by which the NWC can be assessed.With respect to the Guaranteed Standards Scheme, under normal circumstances, customers could claim compensation for any breaches in services relating to access to water supply (connections), delivery of bills, response to bill-related and non-bill related complaints, account status, meter installation, repair or replacement of faulty meters, meter reading, reconnections, payment of overdue amounts, and payment of compensation by the NWC to customers. “Generally speaking, it (the standards) can be suspended if something happened out of the control of the company, and hurricane is a part of it, bad weather, natural disaster, civil unrest, strikes – those are a part of the list of conditions that will allow them to apply for a suspension,” Miss James outlined.“During this time period, what the customers of NWC would need to know is that if, for example, the water pressure is low, or let’s say they file a complaint, and NWC didn’t respond within five working days, according to the standards, they cannot submit a claim and say, ‘you have breached this standard’ because of the circumstances surrounding it. Even if the customer applies while submitting a claim for a breach, the company will say, but the standards are suspended until after September 17,” she pointed out. She noted that poor water quality and unreliability in supply are some of the usual effects of the passage of a hurricane on the public water supply system.“This would be high turbidity because of the soil erosion or because of the hurricane, because of the flooding or you may not get water 24 hours because of a breakdown in the system or there is no light, so its unreasonable to expect the company to deliver continuous service given that they (NWC) have to wait on JPS (Jamaica Public Service) to reconnect,” she reasoned.Under the Office of Utilities Regulation Act, water and sewerage providers must notify and apply to OUR for exemption from the Quality of Standards Scheme, in circumstances where compliance is beyond their control. The standards document states that “the OUR must be promptly notified by the NWC in all cases of suspension or proposed suspension of the scheme indicating the exact duration of such suspension, and that the burden of proof of exceptional circumstance will lie with the NWC.”Examples of Force Majeure conditions or exceptional events are: bad weather or natural disaster, system conditions such as major breakdown of treatment plants or pumping stations, drought, civil unrest, strikes, and malicious destruction of property.Last Friday (Aug. 24), NWC’s Risk and Insurance Manager, Karl McDonald, told the media at a press briefing held at the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management’s Camp Road offices that damage to the municipal water and sewerage system has to date chalked up “$52 million and counting”.Mr. McDonald also reported that the company had restored 80 per cent of its capacity to customers on its larger systems, but were facing constraints with disrupted power supply, which was affecting the smaller systems.Persons can find more information on the Quality of Service Standards regulations at OUR’s website at www.our.org.jm. RelatedOUR Grants NWC 30-Day Suspension Of Quality Of Service Standardscenter_img OUR Grants NWC 30-Day Suspension Of Quality Of Service Standards UncategorizedAugust 31, 2007 RelatedOUR Grants NWC 30-Day Suspension Of Quality Of Service Standardslast_img read more

Read More »

Grange wishes Nettleford a speedy recovery

first_imgRelatedGrange wishes Nettleford a speedy recovery RelatedGrange wishes Nettleford a speedy recovery RelatedGrange wishes Nettleford a speedy recovery Grange wishes Nettleford a speedy recovery CultureJanuary 28, 2010center_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Kingston, January 28, 2010 – The Honourable Olivia Grange, MP, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture has expressed her concern upon learning that Professor Rex Nettleford had fallen ill in the United States.Minister Grange told Professor Nettleford’s family that she was “hoping for his speedy recovery to full health. I will keep him in my prayers.”Professor Nettleford is a Fellow at the Institute of Jamaica, an agency of the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture. Advertisementslast_img

Read More »

Court case and motor insurance

first_imgCourt case and motor insurance The Government Actuary’s Department (GAD) has undertaken a high-level review to explore the potential impacts of a court ruling on the scope of the compulsory motor insurance cover.The review was written for the Department for Transport (DfT) which asked GAD to look at the range of costs involved in extending insurance cover. The changes affected both existing vehicle types as well as new vehicles and activities, including the impact on UK motor sports.Legal rulingThe legal ruling came about after a court case was brought by a Mr Vnuk, a farm worker in Slovenia. He was injured in an accident involving an insured tractor and a trailer, on farmland in 2007.Domestic courts rejected the claim, but it was subsequently referred to the European Court of Justice who ruled in favour of the farm worker; the Vnuk Judgment.This challenged the UK’s interpretation of motor insurance requirements, potentially increasing both the types of vehicle that needed to be covered and the situations when insurance was needed.GAD’s expertiseGAD undertook the analysis between 2017 to 2019. We considered the impact of a number of different policy options that DfT could pursue in response to the legal ruling.In further analysis in 2019, GAD revisited the assumptions relating to motor sport activity in the UK. This reflected new research which suggested the amount of unlicensed activity in motor sport was higher than originally anticipated. The updated UK motor sport exposure was considered in analysis presented to DfT in March 2019.The tax and advisory firm Grant Thornton peer reviewed the analysis. It said: “GAD’s methodology and assumptions as described in the GAD report are reasonable and fit for purpose given the data and information available”.Analysis and estimatesGAD actuary Matt Kirkpatrick undertook the research and wrote the report. He said: “This was an exciting but complex piece of work which looked to assess a wide range of motor activity, including new areas of cover where historical data did not exist.“With the assistance of a number of industry stakeholders we helped DfT to examine the impact of several different policy options and looked at what these could mean for insurance.“As part of this actuarial review, we also included additional analysis relating to the Personal Injury Discount Rate. This is used to calculate lump sum compensation payments for high value personal injury claims”. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:accident, compensation, court case, Europe, european, exposure, Government, historical data, industry, insurance, research, Slovenia, trailer, Transport, UK, UK Governmentlast_img read more

Read More »

Fiske Planetarium Invites Public To Spring Lecture Series, Sky Viewings

first_imgSeveral noted faculty members at the University of Colorado at Boulder will present lectures in the Fiske Planetarium during the spring semester lecture series. “Once a month, come share the beauty of the heavens in the Star Theater,” said Katy Garmany, astronomer and planetarium director. “Audiences will be able to ask questions of the astronomer speakers and learn about what1s happening in the night sky.” The Friday evening talks for adults are appropriate for children over age 10 and will feature the planetarium’s star projector and special effects, including images from the Hubble Space Telescope. Admission will be charged. If weather permits, the talks will be followed by viewings at Sommers-Bausch Observatory using the 18-inch and 16-inch telescopes. Admission is $3.50 for adults and $2 for seniors and for children over age 12. For information about programs at Fiske Planetarium call (303) 492-5001 for a recorded announcement or (303) 492-5002 to speak to the planetarium staff. Following is a schedule of Fiske Planetarium spring semester talks by CU-Boulder astronomers: €On Jan. 24 at 7:30 p.m. in Fiske Planetarium, astronomy Associate Professor Andrew Hamilton will open the series with “Black Holes and Relativity.” Hamilton will show what it1s like to travel at nearly the speed of light and describe the fundamentals of relativity using such terms as “time dilation,” “Lorentz contraction beaming” and “redshift.” The audience will experience a simulated fall into a black hole. €On Feb. 7 at 7:30 p.m. in Fiske Planetarium, astronomy Associate Professor John Bally will discuss “Birth of the Universe” and its early evolution. He will travel back to the beginning of time using the latest images beamed from ground and space. €On March 7 at 7:30 p.m. in Fiske Planetarium, astronomer Katy Garmany will talk on “Earth and Sky: Before the Telescope” at 7:30 p.m. in Fiske Planetarium. With the arrival of Comet Hale-Bopp, people will be interested in how best to view this newest celestial visitor. Garmany will discuss prehistoric and pretelescopic astronomy, constellations, calendars, sundials, eclipses and navigation. €On April 11 at 7:30 p.m. in Fiske Planetarium, astronomy Associate Professor John Bally will discuss “Galactic Recycling” and what the night sky would look like if you could see it with infrared eyes. He will describe the origin of elements, the life and death of stars and constant cycling of matter between stars and the Milky Way. €On May 2 at 7:30 p.m. in Fiske Planetarium, astronomy Associate Professor Bruce Jakosky will speak on “Is There Extraterrestrial Life?” Jakosky has been involved in the examination of recent discoveries about possible life on Mars. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Jan. 16, 1997 last_img read more

Read More »

Smartphone users value their privacy and are willing to pay for it, CU-Boulder economists find

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Average smartphone users are willing to pay up to $5 extra for a typical application—or “app”—that won’t monitor their locations, contact lists and other personal information, a study conducted by two economists at the University of Colorado Boulder has found.The researchers believe theirs is the first economic study to gauge the monetary value smartphone users place on privacy. That value is measured in consumers’ “willingness to pay” for five different kinds of digital anonymity.The economists’ team surveyed 1,726 people in seven cities nationwide and found a “representative consumer” was willing to pay $2.28 to conceal browser history, $4.05 to conceal contact lists, $1.19 to conceal personal locations, $1.75 to conceal the phone’s ID number, and $3.58 to conceal the contents of text messages.More experienced users—those who use their smartphones continually and for many purposes—are willing to pay more than less-experienced users to conceal their contact lists and text messages. Young people are willing to pay less to protect all five kinds of privacy, the researchers found.And consumers of all types are willing to pay $2.12 to eliminate advertising on apps.The study, “The Value of Online Privacy,” was published online this fall in Social Science Research Network. Associate Professor Scott J. Savage and Professor Donald M. Waldman are co-authors and CU-Boulder economists whose research includes the study of pricing and valuation.In recent years, news reports have variously suggested that people do or do not value their privacy. But those reports were not based on data, Savage and Waldman noted.“There’s minimal research, and even the work that’s done is not in economics. It’s done in the area of computer science, which looks at privacy differently,” said Savage. And while smartphone users might relinquish personal data, that doesn’t mean they don’t value privacy, the economists said.Full disclosure of how apps use personal information, “similar to the labeling of food contents in grocery stores,” could benefit both consumers and app developers, they write.The smartphone is an ideal lens on privacy because it’s easy to see which kinds of privacy—or “permissions”—people give up, Waldman said.Users grant privacy permissions as a condition of using apps, which are burgeoning. Apps for iPhone, Android and Windows smartphones will be downloaded an estimated 5 billion times in the next year.The price of most general-purpose consumer apps ranges from free to $6, though some highly specialized apps used for medical purposes and the like could cost $500 to $1,000.Smartphone apps can save time, and consumers, knowingly or unknowingly, generally trade some personal information for the benefit.Those who download a weather app might allow the app to monitor their phones’ location. That way, users can retrieve local weather information anywhere, anytime without having to consult a newspaper or telephone hotline. Savvy users can reap such benefits across a range of apps.App developers should give consumers clear information and choices about privacy, the economists said. “If consumers know what’s going on, they can make informed choices and pick apps to fit their preferences; it’s way better than any regulation or government interfering in the market that it knows very little about,” Savage said.“They value their privacy, so if you present them with different menus of stuff, they’re going to respond and make, we hope, rational choices,” Waldman said.In many cases, users who give up personal information have a good reason for doing so—because, for instance, they want to find the nearest coffee shop, and an app can provide that information only when it knows where the phone is.However, many apps gather personal data unnecessary for the proper functioning of the app. And that has implications.“Just think about it,” Waldman said. “If someone knows every app you’ve got on your phone and knows how you use it, and have other information on your location and browser history, they have a pretty good picture of who you are.”The surveys were done in summer 2013 in Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, Philadelphia, Portland, Salt Lake City and San Diego.The work was funded by the Engine Research Foundation, a nonprofit organization in San Francisco concerned with startup firms and public policy.More on this story will appear in Colorado Arts & Sciences Magazine at http://artsandsciences.colorado.edu/magazine.Contact: Scott Savage, [email protected] Donald Waldman, [email protected] Clint Talbott, 303-492-6111 Published: Dec. 10, 2013 Categories:AcademicsBusiness & EntrepreneurshipScience & TechnologyCampus CommunityNews Headlines “If consumers know what’s going on, they can make informed choices and pick apps to fit their preferences; it’s way better than any regulation or government interfering in the market that it knows very little about,” said CU-Boulder economist Scott J. Savage whose research includes the study of pricing and valuation.last_img read more

Read More »