Utah Utes football notebook: Vroman erasing worries about replacing Sakoda as kicker

first_imgBesides getting settled on a starter at the quarterback position, perhaps the biggest concern for Ute football coaches in camp has been the kicking game. Replacing a player such as all-American Louie Sakoda, a three-year starter at punter and placekicker, is a tough task.After Thursday’s scrimmage, coach Kyle Whittingham was all smiles while talking about the kicking game.Ben Vroman, who handled kickoffs the last two years, is No. 1 on the depth chart at placekicker, and he showed why Thursday.He went 7-for-7 on the day, making field goals from 49 and 43 yards as well as from 39, 36, 35, 31 and 26 yards.”I was very pleased with the placekicking today,” Whittingham said. “We did a bunch of placekicking in live situations, and Ben Vroman was clearly the top guy and right now unless something dramatic happens, he’ll be handling the kickoffs and the placekicking.”Besides Vroman, freshman Nick Marsh made a 33-yard field goal and Joe Phillips a 36-yarder.”It was a good day for the specialists group,” said Vroman, a senior out of Skyline High. “Spring was a little rough for us, but the first part of the camp we’ve definitely taken some steps forward.”Whittingham also said punter Sean Sellwood was back in action after sitting out earlier in the week and did a “nice job” punting the ball Thursday.”I’m very happy with the whole kicking battery,” said Whittingham. “It’s all way ahead of where we were in the spring.”NOT GOOD ENOUGH: While much of the focus has been on the offensive side of the ball, the defense has been improving each day of practice. However, new defensive coordinator Kalani Sitake was not happy with the defense at Thursday’s scrimmage.”The guys are energetic and running around, but we had too many missed assignments and too many missed tackles,” he said. “Nobody was great today. We were just good. But good is not good enough for this program.”Sitake said the defense did rest seven starters as a precaution, but he still expected more.”It was an opportunity for our inexperienced guys to get in there and play some ball and get some experience,” he said. “But it wasn’t clean enough and crisp enough. We had a lot of mistakes. We need to stay focused on our fundamentals and our technique. We’re anxious for the next time to go live.”ROBLES BACK: Lost amid all the talk about the three-way battle for quarterback is the return of Griff Robles, the highly recruited QB from Spanish Fork High School.The 6-foot-4, 230-pound Robles returned from an LDS mission in June and wasn’t expected to play this fall but was given the scholarship saved for James Aiono, who didn’t qualify academically for this fall.If Robles doesn’t get a chance at quarterback, he may have a future as a defender, a another former quarterback from Utah County, PaulKruger.Robles took some snaps at the end of Thursday’s scrimmage and after getting picked off by Thor Salanoa he laid out the defender with a hard tackle on the sideline.When asked about it later, Sitake said, “That was the hardest hit all day.”EXTRA POINTS: Rice-EcclesStadium will have two new banners on the west side of the stadium this year, commemorating the 2004 season and Fiesta Bowl victory and the 2008 season and SugarBowl victory … Jake Orchard, an all-state receiver for Highland in 2005, has joined the team as a walk-on after recently returning from an LDS mission. He was recruited out of high school by several schools for football but opted to accept a scholarship to play basketball for Weber State as a freshman … The next scrimmage will be Tuesday at the stadium with the final scrimmage set for Aug. 22.last_img read more

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Milner bounces back to win Hua Hin title

first_imgPSC golf from The Outback Golf BarMonday, March 17, Imperial Lake View A & B – Stableford56 players and friends made the trip for the 3rd Hua Hin H’Cap, organised by the Outback Golf Bar.  Many of the guys who travelled up from Aus had been on an Outback Tour before and it was very like an old friends’ reunion and it was great to see the camaraderie amongst all from Pattaya and Aus alike. The format was the same as ever, three tournament rounds on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday with Wednesday being an optional day for golf.  The chosen courses this year:- Round 1 on A & B at Imperial LakeView; Round 2 at the renowned Black Mountain and the Final Round at the fantastic Banyan course.(From left): Greg LeBlanc, Rod Crosswell, Bruce Milner, Keith Buchanan & Steve Mann. We had played Imperial for the first time when we came here last August; it’s an old style somewhat colonial style course bearing remarkable similarities in style to Springfield and I would guess from the same era.  It was OK in the wet season but regrettably the long dry season this year had turned the course very brown and hard; giving way to very tight baldish lies.  The greens were ok but tricky to putt on but overall there were a number of negative comments about the course.It won’t be on the August schedule and there will be a number of others (golf courses) we will try before or if we return here. Their hospitality here however was great and I thank the Manager for everything he did for us.Bruce Milner was the overall winner with 109 points.The scoring was about right in spite of the course comments with the top score being 38pts; two players achieved that – Bob Pearce, winner of Div C and Ed Turner, the runner-up on count back also in Div C.Greg LeBlanc won the D Division with 37 and Kissy Div A with 36.  Div B was a lot closer with four players all tied up on 35pts and it was left again the c/b to sort them all out into order with Tony McDonough heading them from Rod Crosswell, Anton Rowbottam and Barry Copestake with their respective back nines looking like this: 20, 17, 17, 13 and Rod beating Anton on the last six, 12 to 8.Nigel Cannon kindly sponsored four near pins in honour of his birthday and they were won by Bruce Lamont (4th), Brian Maddox (8th), Tony McDonough (14th) and Tim Knight (17th).There were three ‘2’s from Jason Gale (8th), Tony McDonough (14th) and Dino Binlusimoen (17th).Div A (0-14)1st Keith Buchanan (13) 36pts2nd Stephen Mann (10) 34pts3rd Mark Rossiter (12) 34pts4th Rob Guthrie (10) 32ptsDiv B (15-17)1st Tony McDonough (17) 35pts2nd Rod Crosswell (15) 35pts3rd Anton Rowbottam (16) 35pts4th Barry Copestake (15) 35ptsDiv C (18-23)1st Bob Pearce (22) 38pts2nd Ed Turner (21) 38pts3rd Howard Marson (19) 36pts4th Paul Lavender (18) 34ptsDiv D (24+)1st Greg LeBlanc (24) 37pts2nd Dino Binlusimoen (24) 34pts3rd Barney Clarkson (26) 34pts4th Andy Makara (25) 33ptsTuesday, March 18, Black Mountain – StablefordOn our previous high season tours to Hua Hin, Black Mountain has been omitted due to the high green fees but what a mistake that was, which this year, by popular demand was corrected.  This is a fabulous course and it can truly lay claim to being in the top 100 courses in the world.  It was in wonderful condition and is a “must-play” course, when one visits Hua Hin.  Perhaps not exactly everyone’s cup of tea but certainly most of our 56 players would love to come back.Dino chips back to the 18th at Black Mountain.Check in at the pro-shop went smoothly and we teed off on time, the carts were very reasonably priced also at 600 baht and believe it or not, unlike Pattaya courses, the trend here is to allow walkers!Bruce Milner was not happy with Imperial Lake View on Monday but he certainly put that behind him and made up for that today, recording the best score of the day (40pts) to win Div A by three from one of last year’s finalists, Murray Hart (37) and the Mann who is always in the shake up and also one of last year’s finalists, Steve, one further back on 36, beating Kissy on count back.Div B went to the very steady Kim Stokes with a great 39pts from Martin Kingswood (37) and Tony McDonough (36), following up Monday’s excellent round.  Fourth place went to Rod Crosswell.Personally, I don’t think that playing the blue tees contributed to the lower scores in Div C & D but they (the scores) were markedly down with both divisions being won with just 33pts.  Greg Hill took the C Div on c/b from another of last year’s finalists, Howard Marson, with Paul Lavender grabbing third on c/b from Bob Pearce, who was slightly disappointed with his 32 but it was just enough to earn him fourth place.Div D was won again by Greg LeBlanc (33pts) following up his win Monday from one of the new Aussie visitors, Dennis Toal with 31, and Nigel Cannon (30) and welcome back to Geoff Treloar who took the fourth place, also with 30.There were eight ‘2’s from Murray Hart, Johannes Murken & Tony Aslett (3rd), Keith Buchanan, Greg Hill & Barney Clarkson (8th), and Rob Guthrie & Roger Ellis on the 11th.Div A (0-14)1st Bruce Milner (14) 40pts2nd Murray Hart (14) 37pts3rd Stephen Mann (10) 36pts4th Keith Buchanan (13) 36ptsDiv B (15-17)1st Kim Stokes (16) 39pts2nd Martin Kingswood (15) 37pts3rd Tony McDonough (17) 36pts4th Rod Crosswell (15) 34ptsDiv C (18-23)1st Greg Hill (18) 33pts2nd Howard Marson (19) 33pts3rd Paul Lavender (18) 32pts4th Bob Pearce (22) 32ptsDiv D (24+)1st Greg LeBlanc (24) 33pts2nd Dennis Toal (26) 31pts3rd Nigel Cannon (27) 30pts4th Geoff Treloar (28) 30ptsThursday, March 20, Banyan G.C. – StablefordAfter Wednesday’s rest day we had a slightly earlier tee time of 9.30 for the start at Banyan which I have to say was not its usual smooth welcoming operation with the golf bags just being dumped on the floor when we arrived rather than being sorted into carts in an orderly manner.The course however is another class act – beautiful fairways and massive sloping greens, which were made much harder than usual today as they seemed to lack pace making it very difficult to get the ball to the hole – even when putting downhill or with the grain.Two of the four par 3’s are particularly tricky – long uphill hits with many taking a driver on the 17th which surprisingly gave up two birdies (to Mark Rossiter and Rod Crosswell).  Neil Lavery got the only ‘2’ on the 4th (the first of the long uphill par 3’s) with the other two ‘2’s of the day both coming on the short 2nd hole from Eddy Beilby & Reg Williams.Rod Crosswell kindly sponsored the near pins with a bottle of whisky going to each of the winners, who were Reg Williams (2nd), Peter Eriksen (4th), Geoff Treloar (15th) and Barney Clarkson (17th).The course played quite short and as a result the scoring was relatively high with both Suzi and Jack, playing in the first group out, both scoring 40pts each.  Jack won his division (Div C), beating Eddy Beilby on c/b and Suzi came second in Div D after Barney Clarkson posted the day’s best score of 43pts to win that division.Bruce Milner followed up his win at Black Mountain with another here, scoring 39pts and the Div A title from Maurice Copan (38) and Mark Rossiter & Neil Lavery both with 37.The presentation for the all the days was held at Banyan and General Jack congratulated everybody for turning up on time for their tee times which always contributes to the smooth running of a tournament of this size.  He also spoke of the Songkhran tournament which will be staged in Pattaya as the Outback are not going on tour this time – The 3 day tournament is likely to be held at Burapha (Mon 14th April), Khao Kheow or Bangpra (Weds 16th April) and Laem Chabang (Thurs 17th April).Although Bruce Milner had a poor start after only 30pts at Imperial Lake View, he picked up 79pts at Black Mountain and Banyan to win the overall by two on 109pts from Keith Buchanan on 107.  Steve Mann was in equal third with Rod Croswell and Greg LeBlanc, all with 106pts, and Barney’s 43pt final round boosted him from 17th place to a tie for 6th.Div A (0-14)1st Bruce Milner (14) 39pts2nd Maurice Copan (14) 38pts3rd Mark Rossiter (12) 37pts4th Neil Lavery (12) 37ptsDiv B (15-17)1st Rosco Langoulant (17) 39pts2nd Rod Crosswell (15) 37pts3rd Martin Kingswood (15) 37pts4th John Lawton (17) 35ptsDiv C (18-23)1st Jack Moseley (20) 40pts2nd Eddy Beilby (18) 40pts3rd Ed Turner (21) 35pts4th Brian Maddox (23) 34ptsDiv D (24+)1st Barney Clarkson (26) 43pts2nd Suzi Lawton (28) 40pts3rd Reg Williams (25) 39pts4th Bruce McAdam (27) 37ptsNote:  The Outback Golf Bar is situated about 6km from Sukhumvit Road along Soi Siam Country.  Call Jack on 081 578 1956.last_img read more

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Where is Tom Herrington?

first_imgThen a phone call from the bus. They were waiting for one more passenger, but no-one had realized that group 7 was still on the course. They had dropped behind and were caught in the rain, so took shelter. As they were ready to go they called a group from another society to play through so, consequently, finished much later than the rest.Those waiting in the bus were asking “where is Tom Herrington?” At last he boarded and they were on their way.Next up we travel to Bangpakong which is in a different province, so perhaps have different weather gods. We will make the same request about the rain and cross fingers we have the same result.Counting down the days to return to competition golf, not too many more to wait, hopefully. The, now routine, health check-in at Greenwood Golf Club was simple and easy as was the service at the green fees counter, and then to the locker rooms. Yes, happily, they are open, but no showers, of course.Our 27 golfers gathered at the marshaling area to be told that we would have a two tee start, even though we only had seven groups, but it is always welcome. All groups got away a little earlier than scheduled.Before the forced layoff this course was always presented in great condition, so it is a credit to the ground staff and management that, after so long, they were able to give us that same standard today.Promoted ContentbrainberriesThe Biggest Cities In The World So FarbrainberriesbrainberriesbrainberriesBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Thembrainberriesbrainberries Fairways were well grassed and nicely mown and the greens running truly and at pace, just how we like them.Since our washout at Laem Chabang earlier in the week we asked the weather gods if we could have lots of rain, but after we finished play. This was granted at Pattavia and, as the last group exited the eighteenth that day, the heavens opened.We asked the gods for the same today and, once again, it was granted. The sky grew darker as all groups finished and headed off to return to Pattaya, since there are no showers.The rain tumbled down as we drove on the motorway. Loading…Sponsored ContentBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them6 Best Natural History Museums In The WorldLook At Something Beautiful That Wasn’t Made By A Human Being9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A Tattoo Promoted Content10 Incredibly Looking Albino AnimalsbrainberriesThe Highest Paid Football Players In The Worldbrainberries10 Extremely Dirty Seas In The WorldbrainberriesWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?brainberriesFake brand-name goods worth over 100 million baht seized in Bangkok – Patt…13 kids at weddings who just don’t give a hootbrainberriesThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s Hystericalbrainberries7 Famous And Incredibly Unique Places In ThailandbrainberriesThailand focuses on Vietnamese second spread of COVID-19 cases – Pattaya M…5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksbrainberriesThese Guys Are Turning 50 This Year. Feeling Old Yet?brainberriesBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThembrainberriesAll quarantines in Thailand apply same rules for both Thai and foreign arr…7 Theories About The Death Of Our UniversebrainberriesA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombsbrainberries Phil phoned, “Where are you, it’s five to nine?” A mumbling of some unprintable words and a sound of “on my way.”We are not sure what shortcut he took on the motorbike from Soi 12 to Links, but he arrived in time to jump in the bus. Pattaya Sports Club Links Golf SocietyFri May 15 Greenwood A+B StablefordEveryone was at Links and in receipt of their 550 baht green fee voucher. Those in cars loaded up or had already left, and the bus was due to leave at 9.00 am. Everyone was there, that is, except Tom.last_img read more

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Sports deaths 2015: Banks, Gifford, Smith, Tarkanian, Berra

first_imgIn this 1970 file photo, Chicago Cubs’ Ernie Banks poses. The Cubs announced Friday night, Jan. 23, 2015, that Banks had died. The team did not provide any further details. Banks was 83. (AP Photo/File)The loss column is where to look in the standings. Those are the ones that can never be made up.And losses, of a different kind, hit Philadelphia in 2015 with the deaths of two 76ers centers — backboard-busting Darryl Dawkins and Moses Malone, who gave basketball a math lesson with his playoff sweep prediction of “Fo’, Fo’, Fo’” that fell just short.Joining them was Dolph Schayes, the Syracuse Nationals center who briefly played for and coached Philadelphia in its Wilt Chamberlain days.There were losses in baseball of Joaquin Andujar, Dean Chance, Darryl Hamilton, Tommy Hanson, Bill Monbouquette, Al Rosen. In hockey, the bespectacled Islander coach Al Arbour and the great Canadiens winger Dickie Moore.Losses of boxing champions Gene Fullmer and Bob Foster. And in football of Ken Stabler, the left-handed quarterback of the renegade Raiders, and Garo Yepremian, whose slapstick field-goal attempt lives on in Super Bowl lore.Losses of those who cut a path for Black players to follow: Minnie Minoso (baseball), Earl Lloyd (basketball), Pete Brown, Calvin Peete, Charlie Sifford (golf); and Mal Whitfield (track).And those while on the job: IndyCar driver Justin Wilson, struck by debris at Pocono and gone the next day at 37.Below, other losses, lives that soared across the games:In this Aug. 31, 1955, file photo, Chicago Cubs’ Ernie Banks, center, demonstrates the long stride and wrist action which has brought him close to the leaders in the National League home run race at Ebbets Field in New York. The Cubs announced Friday night, Jan. 23, 2015, that Banks had died. The team did not provide any further details. Banks was 83. (AP Photo/File)ERNIE BANKSLots of players are in the Hall of Fame. But how many bring a credo, a way of life, with them? “It’s a great day for baseball. Let’s play two.” Ernie Banks wouldn’t have it any other way.He came up in the old Negro Leagues, a skinny shortstop with a whip-fast swing and sinewy wrists, playing his way into the hearts of Chicago baseball fans.At a time when the National League could point to the mighty Willie Mays, Hank Aaron and Frank Robinson, Banks stood beside them as noble peer. He died at 83.He played 19 seasons and hit 512 homers. And he did it for the Cubs, who for more than a century have crafted the art of frustration and defeat.Banks never made it to the postseason but he did make the All-Star team 11 times and was MVP in 1958 and 1959. He was a Gold Glove shortstop before switching to first base.But the stats, in all their indisputable evidence, don’t’ account for why there is a statue of “Mr. Cub” outside Wrigley Field or his No. 14 flies on the left-field foul pole.Banks spoke to the transcendent joys of sports. He always found time to chat with fans. He never was ejected from a game and never argued with umpires. Why stoop to such pettiness when it’s a privilege to play baseball?He once said the “riches of the game are in the thrills, not the money.” The thrill he wanted most eluded him: hitting three homers in the last game of the World Series at Wrigley. But, as Hall of Famer Al Kaline reminds, Cubs fans had ample compensation.“They never got to see a World Series,” he said. “But they can always say they got to see the great Ernie Banks.”___FRANK GIFFORDHis was the golden life.The USC All-American with chiseled looks who became the face of the great New York Giant teams of the 1950s and ’60s and then rode another wave of celebrity in the “Monday Night Football” booth and as husband of TV host Kathie Lee Gifford.Frank Gifford often said his life was divided into three parts, and each was a blueprint in elegant living. Not everyone at Yankee Stadium shares a locker with Mickey Mantle.Gifford — a running back, defensive back, wide receiver and special teams player — played in five NFL title games and was the league’s MVP in 1956. Giants co-owner John Mara called him “the ultimate Giant.”In 1960, a pulverizing hit by the Eagles’ Chuck Bednarik (who also died this year, at 89) left Gifford with a head injury so severe he didn’t return to football until 1962. In 1964, Gifford was back in the Pro Bowl.For many, though, Gifford was the calm at the center of the rollicking storm of “Monday Night Football.” On one side of Gifford was Howard Cosell, all bombast and grandiloquence, a raging Jeremiah in a network blazer. On the other was Don Meredith, ladling out country corn as if accompanied by the banjo soundtrack of “Deliverance.” It was left to Gifford to return everyone to Planet Football. “Third and long, two receivers split wide .”Gifford died at his Connecticut home at 84. Months later, his family said he showed signs of degenerative brain disease. (Two of Bednarik’s daughters said their father had dementia, tied to football injuries.) The Gifford family took comfort in knowing Frank Gifford “might be an inspiration for others suffering from this disease that needs to be addressed.”in this May 5, 1984 file photo, North Carolina guard Michael Jordan, left, and Tar Heels coach Dean Smith are shown at a news conference in Chapel Hill, N.C., where Jordan announced he would forfeit his final year of college eligibility to turn pro. Smith, the North Carolina basketball coaching great who won two national championships, died “peacefully” at his home Saturday night, Feb. 7, 2015, the school said in a statement Sunday from Smith’s family. He was 83. (AP Photo, File)DEAN SMITHIf college basketball had a Mount Rushmore, a place in the mountainside would be carved for Dean Smith.He was the soul of basketball at North Carolina. He led the Tar Heels to 11 Final Fours, won national titles in 1982 and 1993, gave the sport its clock-draining Four Corners offense, earned an Olympic title in 1976 and coached some of the game’s best. Among them was Michael Jordan, who said he loved Smith for always being there when he needed him.Roy Williams, the current Tar Heels coach, lauded Smith as the “perfect picture of what a college coach should have been.” Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski said Smith helped “mold men of integrity, honor and purpose.”Smith died at 83, his basketball roots going back to Kansas, where played on a Jayhawks team coached by Phog Allen that won the 1952 NCAA title. Smith would go on to surpass Adolph Rupp for the most coaching victories in men’s Division I (879 in 36 seasons). Krzyzewski now has the record.Off the court, Smith left a different imprint. He was among the first to recruit black athletes in the South, helped integrate a Chapel Hill restaurant and, in his way, spurred the civil rights movement.“Basketball,” President Barack Obama said in connection with Smith, “can tell us a lot more about who you are than a jump shot alone ever could.” In 2013, Smith was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.“Sometimes the word legend is used with too little thought,” said John Swofford, the Atlantic Coast Conference Commissioner and former North Carolina athletic director. “In this instance, it almost seems inadequate. He was basketball royalty.”In this Nov. 15, 1995, file photo, Fresno State coach Jerry Tarkanian watches his team play Weber State during the preseason NIT in Fresno, Calif. (AP Photo/Thor Swift, File)JERRY TARKANIANHe was a sketch artist’s dream: the basset-hound eyes, the bald head, the forlorn look and, of course, the towel clamped between his teeth.Jerry Tarkanian built a basketball power at UNLV, coaching teams full of bravado that became a dazzling piece of the Strip’s high wattage. He was also in perpetual war with the NCAA, a legal entanglement spanning his career at Long Beach State, UNLV and Fresno State.The casino lights dimmed when Tarkanian died at 84, three days after Dean Smith. Las Vegas pays homage to headline acts.Tarkanian was the consummate teacher on the court, preaching a fierce defense that may not have gotten full due because of all the noise from the Runnin’ Rebels’ amped-up offense.He drew respect from coaches and love from players. But the NCAA sang no songs for “Tark the Shark.” Lawsuits do that. (Tarkanian won a $2.5 million settlement, but the sting never left.)Tarkanian was among the first to rely on junior college players and go with all-black lineups. The NCAA felt he played fast and loose with rules. Probation followed his teams. A photo of UNLV players in a hot tub with a game fixer only heightened the team’s outlaw aura. For his part, Tarkanian felt the NCAA pounced on small schools while letting the big boys off easy.Tarkanian coached the likes of Larry Johnson, Stacey Augmon and Greg Anthony. The Rebels made it to four Final Fours and won the 1990 title, shredding Duke 103-73 in the final. In all, he coached 31 seasons (19 at UNLV). Only twice did he not win 20 games in a season.“I knew right from Day One I wanted to be a coach,” he said. “Coaching has been my entire life.”___YOGI BERRAAfter all the countless tributes — his decency, his friendship, his love of family, his dignity, his faith, his wit (intentional or otherwise), his valor in battle — it’s important to never lose sight of this:What a player he was.Yogi Berra, the anchor behind the plate of all those imperious Yankee teams, played 19 seasons in the majors in a career covering three decades. He was the American League MVP three times (1951, 1954, 1955). He played on 10 World Series winners and in 75 World Series games — both records. He made 18 straight All-Star teams.Casey Stengel once said Berra understood how every hitter should be pitched to. He caught Don Larsen’s perfect game in the 1956 World Series, his leap into the pitcher’s arms a moment frozen in baseball history.But No. 8, the Hall of Famer with that welcoming mug of a face who died at 90, was more than all the compilation of his records. He managed for George Steinbrenner, and stood head and shoulders above the owner’s unending tirades. Berra always had the right thing to say, and say it as only he could. He became the country’s everyman philosopher, coming off the bench to pinch-hit for Mark Twain and Will Rogers.“The Baseball Encyclopedia” speaks to one side of Berra, “Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations” the other: “You can observe a lot by watching”; “When you come to a fork in the road, take it”; “I really didn’t say everything I said.”“Yogi was a beacon of Americana,” Commissioner Rob Manfred said.Jorge Posada, another ex-Yankee catcher, said Berra “made you feel good inside.” Hall of Fame shortstop Cal Ripken knew he was in special company when Berra was around.“When Yogi spoke, everyone was quiet and hung on every word,” he said. “He owned the room.”___Contributing to this report were AP sports writers Aaron Beard, Tim Dahlberg, Mike Fitzpatrick, Ben Walker, Barry Wilner and AP writer Mike Stewart.last_img read more

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