Max Chernin, Jim Stanek & More to Lead New Musical Passing Through at Goodspeed

first_img View Comments Max Chernin(Photo provided by Goodspeed Musicals) Casting is here for Passing Through, the highly anticipated new musical arriving at Goodspeed’s Terris Theatre this summer. Directed by Igor Goldin, choreographed by Marcos Santana and music-directed by Matt Meckes, the previously announced production will run from July 26 through August 18 at the Chester, CT venue.The principal cast will include Max Chernin (Sunday in the Park with George) as Andrew, Jim Stanek (Fun Home) as Andrew’s Dad, Garrett Long (Dear Evan Hansen) as Andrew’s Mom, Celeste Rose (We Are the Tigers) as Karie and Jennifer Leigh Warren (Little Shop of Horrors) as Emma/The Professor.Featuring a book by Eric Ulloa (26 Pebbles) and a score by Brett Ryback (Nate the Great), Passing Through tells the true story of a young man (Chernin) who journeys on foot from Pennsylvania to California, collecting stories as he goes. When his trek brings to light an unresolved family crisis, he must use the lessons he’s gathered to finally confront his past.The ensemble will include Joan Almedilla (Miss Saigon), Reed Armstrong (Miss Saigon), Ryan Duncan (Getting the Band Back Together), Linedy Genao (On Your Feet!), Charles Gray (Grease) and Mary Jo Mecca (The Beauty Prize).Passing Through will feature scenic design by Adam Koch, costume design by Tracy Christensen, lighting design by Cory Pattak and sound design by Jay Hilton.last_img read more

Read More »

Leawood Rotarian organizes donations for St. Joseph Medical Center workers in need

first_imgWhen Leawood Rotarian Mary Reed heard that St. Joseph Medical Center employees who had their hours cut were in need — from fellow Leawood Rotarian and Chief Executive Officer Jodi Fincher — she organized a food collection drive within the organization to help out.Last week, Reed held the food drive for three days on her front porch, allowing Rotarians, their friends and family, and her neighbors to drop off essential goods for St. Joseph employees. St. Joseph is a large sponsor of the Rotary Club’s annual 5K fundraiser, and as a nonprofit professional, Reed said she felt strongly that she wanted to lead this effort to give back to a community she would have never known was in need.“Since I’m always going with my hands out [asking St. Joseph] to buy a sponsorship, it was my way to give back — I was on the other end of it,” Reed said.The club and the community made a large turnout: Reed said that her porch filled up with goods on the first day, and day two and three were no different. Donors raided their own pantries and some took to store aisles for the cause, Reed said. The donation is estimated to have amounted to around $1,000 worth of food, cleaning supplies and paper goods, Reed said.While giving back to the community is the norm for the Rotary Club, Reed said it is usually in the form of a check. Recently, the club gave a $20,000 check to Catholic Charities and one to the Church of Resurrection to help those impacted by COVID-19, she said.“The Leawood Rotary is always, quietly doing things like this,” Reed said.Fincher said St. Joseph Medical Center is “incredibly thankful” for the Leawood Rotarian donation to its employee food drive, as it will help to ensure affected employees are not short on food. Those who wish to participate in the employee food drive can contact Director of Marketing Ericka Beeler at (816) 943-2687.last_img read more

Read More »

The essence of tourism in Istria – so simple, and so ingenious

first_imgFor the 11th year in a row, the Tourist Board of the City of Pula and the Tourist Board of the Municipality of Fažana have been organizing the summer fair of Istrian souvenirs – Istrian hand made. At the Summer Fair of Craftsmen every week from 15.6.-15.9. artisans will exhibit, sell and produce souvenirs and handicrafts; on Mondays and Tuesdays in Pula, on Wednesdays in Fažana. The working hours of the fair are from 15.6-31.8. from 20-23, and from 1.9.-15.9. from 19-22 hours. 2016 craftsmen will participate in the Istrian hand made fair in 14, and the goal of the event is to enrich the tourist offer of the city and provide tourists with the opportunity to buy handicrafts and indigenous souvenirs.Istra mix, ie the Fair of Istrian gourmet products and souvenirs – Istrian hand made and Istra gourmet, will also be held from 15.06. to 15.09. for the 7th year in a row in Fažana and the 2nd year from 07.07. to 25.08. in Ližnjan. In Fažana, where the event will be held on Wednesday, in addition to souvenir producers), producers of gourmet products participate, while in Ližnjan the event is held every Thursday from 20 to 23 hoursThe interesting thing about this event is that some items are made directly in front of tourists. All exhibitors have T-shirts and bags with the Istrian hand made logo to make the event recognizable. Could this tourist story be better?Kudos to the Tourist Boards of Pula and Fažana, that is what our tourism lacks. This is the foundation of a tourist destination development – respect yourself and you will respect others. Tourists want to get to know, feel, taste indigenous local products, even if you tell them a story that’s it – the essence of tourism. This must be the foundation of tourism of all tourist destinations, and the rest is an upgrade. The Germans don’t want to try German sausages, but our homemade ones. And if they like it, they will buy it and take it home where, in the company of their friends, they will spread the story of a great vacation and taste our home-made and indigenous sausage. Sausage is just a metaphor, we have to sell ourselves, our culture, gastronomy, history and identity. This is what tourists want to experience. This tourist story is so simple, and yet so ingenious. It should be the standard story of each of our tourist destinations.We must finally understand that tourism is not the sun and the sea, and that our greatest advantage is precisely this diversity through history, gastronomy, music, culture, customs and everything else. We have thousands of different indigenous stories, we just have to be who we are and tell those stories. Let us be what we are because tourists want to see, experience and taste just that. We do not need a new big idea of ​​our tourism, but finally we have to be and sell what we are – Istrians, Dalmatians, Slavonians, Međimurje, Zagorje, Ličani…. Croats. Let’s be what we are – indigenous, authentic and credible! That is the story we have to tellTourism consists of emotions, experiences and stories. Tell stories.last_img read more

Read More »

New study of freelance workers examines link between their well-being and hours worked

first_imgEmail LinkedIn Share on Facebook A new study of freelance workers has discovered key factors that affect their well-being – either making them happier or increasing anxiety and risking depression.The six-month study to be published in the journal Human Relations was conducted by Professor Stephen Wood from the University of Leicester’s School of Management and George Michaelides from Birkbeck, University of London.A key finding is that as the hours of freelance workers fluctuate so does the well-being of freelance or portfolio workers, such as copy editors, web designers, coaches, translators, personal trainers. Sharecenter_img Pinterest Share on Twitter Professor Wood said: “Freelance workers are calmer and more enthusiastic when their hours are higher than their normal pattern of working.“In contrast when the demands they face are difficult – for example, they experience conflicting or difficult requirements – their anxiety increases and their enthusiasm declines and they may even become depressed.“Demands adversely affect people’s work–life balance, in particular work interferes with fulfilling family and other non-work commitments or pursuits. But so does the enthusiasm generated by longer hours. The enthusiasm may be at the expense of non-work activities, as, for example, people may not readily leave tasks uncompleted to be finished another time.”Dr Michaelides added: “Demands thus generate what has long been called stress-based work–family/non-work interference but hours generate a largely unrecognised phenomenon, enthusiasm-based work–family/non-work interference.“The calmness associated with long hours has, though, the opposite effect – it decreases work–family/non-work interference.”The study is based on a diary study involving 47 freelance workers completing an identical survey every week for six months.The study shows that freelance workers are subject to the same pressures as other workers, and thus conflicting demands that constrain and hinder people from smoothly fulfilling their tasks and achieving their potential adversely affect their work–life balance and well-being.  In addition when they have control over and variety in their work they are happier, which is also true for most workers.But the enthusiasm-based interference may be more limited to people whose opportunities for work and income associated with it fluctuate. For example people on piecework or commission may appreciate more hours. Zero-hour workers might be the extreme of this. The long hours needed to fulfil tasks may be seen as challenge and not a hindrance as conflicting demands may be.Freelance workers, portfolio workers or independent contractors are self-employed individuals who do assignments, either in series or in parallel, for a number of different organisations or clients, on a (typically short-term) commercial rather than employment contract basis.The research is reported in a paper to be published later this year: S. Wood and G. Michaelides, Hindrance and challenge stressors and well-being based work–non-work interference: A diary study of portfolio workers, Human Relations, in press.last_img read more

Read More »

Violence spreads like a disease among adolescents, study finds

first_imgLinkedIn Pinterest Share Share on Facebook “This study shows just how contagious violence can be,” said Robert Bond, lead author of the study and assistant professor of communication at The Ohio State University.“Acts of violence can ricochet through a community, traveling through networks of friends.”Results showed that participants in the study were 48 percent more likely to have been in a serious fight, 183 percent more likely to have hurt someone badly, and 140 percent more likely to have pulled a weapon on someone if a friend had engaged in the same behavior.Bond conducted the study with Brad Bushman, professor of communication and psychology at Ohio State. Their results appear online in the American Journal of Public Health.These results fit in with other studies that have shown that characteristics and behaviors from happiness to obesity to smoking spread within social networks, at about the same rates found in this research.“We now have evidence that shows how important social relationships are to spreading violent behavior, just like they are for spreading many other kinds of attitudes and behaviors,” Bushman said.Data from the study came from 5,913 young people who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (ADD Health) and who were interviewed in-depth in 1994-95 and again in 1996. The ADD Health researchers interviewed as many students (grades 7 to 12) as they could from 142 schools across the country so they could have information on social networks within each school.Participants were asked to name up to five male and five female friends from their school at both of the two interviews. They were asked how often in the past 12 months they had been in a serious physical fight, how often they hurt someone badly enough to need bandages or care from a doctor or nurse, and how often they had pulled a knife or gun on someone.The researchers then analyzed whether each student’s friends (and friends of friends, and so on) had said they committed the same acts of violence.The finding that adolescents were more likely to commit acts of violence if their friends had done so is not surprising, Bond said. Much of that association is related to what scientists call a “clustering effect” – people with similar interests, including the use of violence, tend to cluster together as friends.But the researchers also tested whether friends could influence each other to commit more acts of violence than they might normally commit given their friendship.They could estimate this influence effect because they had data from two different points in time, a year apart. They calculated the effect by determining whether friends had committed more violent acts at the time of the second interview than could be explained by what their shared history at the time of the first interview would suggest.Results showed that each additional friend who had seriously hurt someone increased the likelihood that a participant had hurt someone badly by 55 percent, even after taking into account the clustering effects and other factors. If you include only male participants (who were more likely than females to seriously hurt others), then the likelihood increased to 82 percent.After taking the controls into account, the researchers didn’t find influence effects for being in a serious fight or pulling a weapon on someone. But that doesn’t necessarily mean the influence of friends doesn’t play a role in these violent acts, Bond said.One explanation may be that fights are common enough among these adolescents that it is difficult to find the role of influence. On the other hand, pulling a weapon was rare enough that they may not have had a large enough sample size to determine influence.This study is the first to show how far violent behavior may spread within a social network, Bond said. The findings showed that the influence of one person’s violent act can spread up to two degrees of separation (friend of a friend) for hurting someone badly, three degrees (friend of a friend’s friend) for pulling a weapon on someone, and four degrees for serious fights.The influence declines with each degree of separation, but is still noticeable.For example, a student in the study was about 48 percent more likely to have participated in a serious fight if a friend had been involved in one. But they were still 18 percent more likely to have participated in a fight if a friend of a friend had.This result is particularly important because it shows the value of anti-violence programs.“If we can stop violence in one person, that spreads to their social network. We’re actually preventing violence not only in that person, but potentially for all the people they come in contact with,” Bond said.center_img Email A new study of U.S. adolescents provides some of the best evidence to date of how violence spreads like a contagious disease.Researchers found that adolescents were up to 183 percent more likely to carry out some acts of violence if one of their friends had also committed the same act.But the spread of violence doesn’t just stop at friends – results suggest the contagion extends by up to four degrees of separation – from one person to a friend, to the friend’s friend and two more friends beyond. Share on Twitterlast_img read more

Read More »

UAE study finds high MERS seroprevalence in some camel workers

first_imgA new MERS-CoV seroprevalence study of camel workers in Abu Dhabi found high levels for people in certain jobs, as Saudi Arabia—the country hit hardest by the virus—reported three more cases, all in people who contracted the virus from other patients.Exposures in markets, slaughterhousesFor the seroprevalence study, a research team from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) examined blood samples of camel workers from 2014 to 2017. Some workers were from an open-air camel market in Abu Dhabi linked to a 2015 human case, and others worked at two of the city’s camel slaughterhouses.Their goals were to sift out specific risk factors that seem more likely to lead to MERS-CoV (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus) transmission to help guide steps to prevent infections in people and to pinpoint risk groups that would benefit from a future vaccine. The team published its findings yesterday in an early online edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases.Three rounds of blood sampling took place during the study period, and though all workers were asked to provide samples, participation was voluntary. Some workers were repeatedly sampled during multiple rounds.During the third round of sampling, investigators administered a survey to gather information about worker demographics, travel history, consumption of raw camel products (meat, milk, and urine, which is actually a practice for some in the country), camel-related work tasks, personal protective equipment use, and handwashing practices.Levels highest in camel salesmenAntibody tests on blood samples were conducted at the CDC.Round 1 involved samples from 100 workers, round 2 from 151 workers, and round 3 from 235 workers. MERS-CoV antibodies were found in 6% of samples from round 1, 19% from round 2, and 17% from round 3.Among all workers, MERS-CoV seroprevalence was especially high for certain occupations, especially camel salesmen (49%) and animal or waste transporters (22%). Self-reported diabetes was another factor linked to being seropositive, which fits with earlier reports of underlying health conditions as a risk factor for MERS-CoV infection.Of just the market workers, giving medications to live camels and using cleaning equipment were associated with increased risk of being seropositive for MERS-CoV.Among other findings, MERS-CoV was detected in market camels during the study period, and one worker seroconverted, hinting at active transmission from camels to people.”Taken collectively, our findings suggest an underestimated prevalence of human MERS-CoV infection in settings where the virus is circulating among camels, probably resulting from camel-to-human transmission,” the group wrote.New cases include 1 from Khafji outbreakMeanwhile, in Saudi Arabia’s steady stream of new cases, the country’s health ministry reported three new infections in updates yesterday and today in its epidemiologic week 15 report. All involve men listed as secondary cases, meaning they probably contracted the virus from another sick patient. Camel exposure is listed as unknown for all three.One of them, age 34, appears to be part of an outbreak in Khafji in northeastern Saudi Arabia near the border with Kuwait, which has now grown to 11 cases.The other patients include a 42-year-old from Ad Darb in the country’s far southwestern Jazan region and a 64-year-old from Al Kharj in central Saudi Arabia.Saudi Arabia has now reported 129 cases for the year.In an update today from the World Health Organization (WHO) Eastern Mediterranean regional office, officials said 9 more cases have been linked to a large outbreak in Wadi ad-Dawasir, raising the total as of the end of March to 61 cases, 8 of them fatal.The agency added that Saudi Arabia’s health ministry has launched a full investigation of the event, including efforts to identify all household and healthcare contacts of patients with confirmed infections. Infection prevention and control steps have been enhanced at health facilities, including for workers in emergency room and intensive care units.The WHO’s snapshot of MERS-CoV activity for March also said 25 cases were reported for the month, all in Saudi Arabia. It put the latest global total since the first human cases were identified in 2012 to 2,399, at least 827 of them fatal. More than 90% of the cases are from Saudi Arabia.See also:Apr 10 Emerg Infect Dis abstractApr 11 MOH updateApr 10 WHO MERS update for Marchlast_img read more

Read More »

2017 Predictions: the future is… uncertain

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Read More »

Mimosa Monday

first_imgThis week’s column serves up a dish of nostalgiaI remember an NPR show where the guest was asked to name an emotion of a goldfish, and they said nostalgia. I thought yes, they don’t make goldfish bowls like they used to. For those of us with a long lens on the Hamptons, we have a certain nostalgia for our own goldfish bowl.I first arrived here at three weeks old and at the door of our cottage — and I do mean cottage and not Stanford White Shingle Style mansion — there was a cement slab with my and my sister’s small footprints. Whenever I felt lost as I got older, I used to stand on those tiny reminders of a different world.I think how to paint the en plein air canvas of that time. In Sagaponack, the land was simply the land, mostly potato fields and sometimes corn tended by large Polish farming families. When they carved up that land for sale with white outlines from aerial shots, it struck me like chalked crime scene scenarios. The McMansions which rose from the fertile loam didn’t seem to nourish anyone.The Hamptons have always included a large second home population but when it is a beautiful Fourth of July Weekend and your gorgeous beach house is empty without owners, guests, renters or clever squatters, it’s a third or fourth home or possibly an LLC for foreign money. Or perhaps they misinterpreted the open space rule to be within the house instead of between them.The currency back then was trust. We had house accounts everywhere from penny candy at the Sagaponack General Store to Loaves and Fishes to the Seafood Shop. We’d pretty much sign and enjoy then get a staggering large bill in the fall, although thankfully that was before lobster salad was $100 a pound. You could even trade art in a pinch as Jackson Pollock did at Mueller’s Grocery store where Almond Restaurant now stands. Rumor has it they subsequently sold the painting for about $30,000 but you can only imagine what it would be worth now.At The American Hotel, gentlemen were required to wear a jacket and they would only accept cash or a check. The American Hotel was also one of the last hold outs for its no cell phone policy. If a gentleman would show up today in a blue blazer without a cell phone and pay by check today, I would date that guy.The Bridgehampton Commons used to be the Bridgehampton Drive-In where the non-Dolby stereo sound or scratchy picture made no difference. A parent would just pile a bunch of us kids in the back and take us out to watch Fantasia. Our cute golf club had a sign I will never forget that said No Short Shorts or Tube Tops. Of course, all I wanted to do was go roller skate down the driveway in said contraband.It was a time when beach houses weren’t winterized, bonfires did not require permits and basements were basements and not “lower levels.” Sag Harbor was filled with sailboats instead of motor boats. Bobby Van’s, which was across the street from its current location, was filled with writers like Truman Capote, George Plimpton, and James Jones instead of Instagram influencers. And you could get delicious homemade ice cream at the Candy Kitchen. Okay, so that one is still here. If only the black and white milkshake had the same power to heal any of life’s disappointments.There was truly a summer season then and we locals would gather at Sagg Main Beach for Mimosa Monday on Labor Day, which was basically a way to say to the rude New Yorkers, “Don’t let the door hit you in the a** on the way out.” You’d see everyone here, from the teachers to firemen to that electrician you were trying to hunt down all summer to fix the porch light. There would be some serious hula hooping, body surfing, and “Oh boy can you top this,” stories of summer people behaving badly. It was a local tradition.One year the police shut it down. I totally respect the safety issues but we always had a designated driver, and it was such an end of summer ritual where we all gathered to realize how darn lucky we were to be in this amazing place. Green Juice Monday doesn’t have the same ring or alliteration.Looking back on these times with perhaps nostalgia, is it that it was less crowded, less regulated, less expensive, less painful, less scheduled, more hopeful? Were we in it more all together? Did a basement have to be a media center to make a house a home? Did the goldfish always want a bigger fish bowl with a better view?Maybe it is that we knew what was enough. It didn’t have to be everything. Just a perfect amount of life well lived to be enough.kissandtellhb@gmail.com Sharelast_img read more

Read More »

Vanzetti technology deployed in newly opened refuelling station in Italy

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

Read More »

Bremer Landesbank Refutes Claims on ECB’s Request to Boost Capital

first_imgGerman shipping lender Bremer Landesbank has denied media reports alleging that the European Central Bank had asked it to boost its capital against non-performing shipping loans with up to EUR 700 million (USD 795 million) in equity.The report emerged in German weekly magazine Focus on Saturday, basing its claims on talks between the city-state’s finance chief and parliamentary leaders.However, the bank said in a statement that both the claim on the request from the ECB and the amount of capital required is “factually inaccurate and unfounded.”Earlier in June, the bank said that due to the continuing difficult market conditions in ship-financing it expects to log EUR 400 million in unplanned value adjustments. For the entire financial year 2016, the bank expects unplanned value adjustments in its portfolio of shipping loans to reach a “high three-digit million figure”, as no significant recovery in the sector is expected in the mid-term.Bremer Landesbank said that its current capital and profit reserves, which count as equity, total in EUR 1.078 billion, and that it has a fund for general banking risks pursuant to § 340g HGB in the amount of EUR 589 million, both of which would, as of now, be available to absorb the expected annual loss.In addition, the bank noted that it has launched “measures to strengthen Bremer Landesbank’s equity”. However, further details on the type of measures being pursued were not disclosed.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

Read More »