South America: Hitting new heights

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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RWE delivers first LNG cargo to Great Britain

first_imgApproximately 150,000 m3 of LNG will be regasified through a Milford Haven LNG Terminal, located close to RWE’s 2,000megawatt Pembroke B gas-fired CCGT Power Station.The cargo was loaded from Sabine Pass Liquefaction Terminal in the Gulf of Mexico and transported by RWE Supply & Trading to Great Britain on the Gaslog Savannah LNG carrier. Source: RWEOnce regasified, the LNG will meet a significant proportion of any gas consumption needs of Pembroke Power Station. Typically, Pembroke burns 8,000,000 m3 of natural gas a day, therefore, one LNG cargo can meet almost half of Pemvroke’s monthly consumption.last_img

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Hill Dickinson appoints Hoyland

first_imgHoyland is an experienced dry shipping lawyer and most recently served as the head of legal for CMA CGM (UK) Shipping.She will be based in Hill Dickinson’s Liverpool office, but will be working closely with London.  www.hilldickinson.comlast_img

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Big fines to ‘criminalise motorists’, says Mr Loophole

first_img‘Disproportionate’ fines for speeding motorists will act as an incentive for those caught to accept fixed penalties, the motoring solicitor dubbed Mr Loophole has suggested.Nick Freeman of Manchester firm Freeman & Co said plans to quadruple the maximum fines for some motoring offences and create a penalty of £10,000 for speeding on a motorway will do nothing to improve road safety.The provisions in the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 to remove limits on magistrates’ fining powers are yet to come into force. Justice minister Jeremy Wright said they would not remove the option of custody in the most serious cases.Richard Monkhouse, chairman of the Magistrates’ Association, which has sought greater sentencing powers, said the increased fining powers are a ‘welcome recognition’ of the role magistrates play in the justice system.‘We hope that this signals a growing trend of trusting magistrates by allowing them the appropriate discretion to deliver local justice, and that other areas for sentencing powers will be examined too,’ he said.Freeman said that the fines will act as an incentive for motorists to accept fixed penalties rather than challenging convictions.He said the proposals have ‘crossed a line’ that criminalises motorists while decriminalising criminals. ‘Motorists will be given huge fines, while if you commit a burglary, you are likely to be cautioned,’ he said.A mandatory 28-day ban for speeding drivers or greater police presence on the roads would be more effective, Freeman said.last_img read more

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Grayling secures MPs’ backing for JR reforms

first_imgThe government has passed its controversial reforms to judicial review through the House of Commons after two late concessions.Lord chancellor and justice secretary Chris Grayling this evening secured MPs’ votes in favour of his proposed changes to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill.The vote came after Grayling made a late offer to give judges the final decision on whether to grant judicial review, and for judicial committees to decide at what financial level individuals who fund cases will have to be identified.But lawyers on the government benches took Grayling to task on his concession allowing judges to grant judicial review where there is an ‘exceptional public interest’.Former attorney general Dominic Grieve and former solicitor general Edward Garnier both decided not to vote with the government, with Garnier describing the public interest clause as ‘moderately nonsensical’.The bill will now pass back to the House of Lords, which has already voted against Grayling’s plans twice before. Unless they defy constitutional convention, peers are now almost certain to approve the legislation.The government wants to change current judicial review rules to make third-party interveners liable for costs and to prevent judges from granting permission for JR even if the public authority has acted unlawfully, if the outcome would have been the same had they acted lawfully.During the debate in the commons, the lord chancellor told MPs his new concessions should address the concerns of peers and retain the original aim of the proposals.‘The bill protects public bodies against cases brought on a technicality,’ he said. ‘[The reforms] don’t undermine the core purpose of judicial review. [But] public bodies are effectively blackmailed in judicial review. This bill stops campaign groups using them to string out the process.’Labour, while welcoming the concessions, continued to oppose the legislation as a whole.Shadow justice minister Andy Slaughter said the concessions were the ‘bare minimum’ the justice secretary thought he could get away with and would lead to satellite litigation with further delays and costs.Grayling will hope for a smoother passage in the Lords for his bill, after seeing peers vote to block it last month following the justice secretary’s admission he had misled parliament during the commons debate.He told the commons tonight that he had ‘mixed up “likelys” with “exceptional circumstances”’.last_img read more

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USMCA signed, not sealed or delivered; U.S.-China trade war hits pause button

first_imgUSMCA: Steps remainNegotiators of the three countries had agreed in principle to USMCA – which replaces a decades-old North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) – on Sept. 30. Approval is needed from Congress and legislative bodies in Mexico and Canada, a process that will likely push into 2019.advertisementadvertisementHow the USMCA signing is viewed primarily depends on which side of the U.S.-Canadian border you dairy. Canadian dairy farmers called the signing a “dark day” in their history and another indication Canada’s government leaders had failed the dairy sector. Leaders of U.S. dairy farmer and processing organizations had praise for the agreement, saying it must be quickly followed up by ratification and implementation before it can be called a success.All U.S. leaders agreed on the main principles of what the USMCA does for dairy – and what it doesn’t do:It preserves duty-free market access to Mexico, the No. 1 foreign market for U.S. dairy products. Mexico accounted for $1.2 billion in U.S. dairy product sales last year, about 25 percent of total U.S. dairy exports. With additional geographic indications provisions, the agreement also protects market access for certain cheese names.It provides incremental increases in U.S. dairy product access to the Canadian market and calls for elimination of the Class 7 pricing system in Canada.It doesn’t lift U.S. Section 232 tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, which in turn leaves retaliatory tariffs imposed by Mexico and Canada on many agricultural products, including dairy, as barriers to exports.NMPF, USDEC say retaliatory tariffs must goLeaders of the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) and the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) commended the signing, but said the ultimate impact of the agreement will depend on how it’s implemented, especially as it pertains to Canada, and the remaining retaliatory tariffs.“This year has been a challenging one for dairy producers, who are dealing with continuing low prices and the damaging effects of retaliatory tariffs that have already cost them about $1.5 billion,” said Jim Mulhern, NMPF president and chief executive officer. [We] encourage the administration to take a fresh look at other tariffs that are hampering North American trade, including the steel and aluminum tariffs still imposed on Mexico, and to continue making progress in striking new free trade agreements and resolving ongoing trade conflicts.”“The signing of the USMCA gives America’s dairy industry greater confidence as we head into 2019,” said Tom Vilsack, USDEC president and chief executive officer. “We trust that the administration will aggressively enforce both the letter and the spirit of the agreed upon text.”advertisementAlthough the U.S. dairy industry had sought deeper market expansion and stronger disciplines from Canada on dairy, Mulhern and Vilsack praised U.S. negotiators for their ardent efforts to address reforms in Canada’s practices.“It is imperative that the United States ensures that Canada implements its commitments in a manner consistent with the hard-fought transparency and market-reforming disciplines secured in this agreement,” Vilsack said.The dairy organization leaders also urged the governments of the three nations to take the next step toward better trade relations by removing currently imposed tariffs on agricultural exports – as well as steel and aluminum – that have been sticking points in relations between the countries.Dairy Farmers of Canada: A dark dayThe head of the Dairy Farmers of Canada (DFC) said the agreement conceded oversight of the country’s dairy system to the U.S.“The oversight clause undermines Canadian sovereignty and its ability to develop and manage Canadian policies without U.S. intervention. This should not be understated and will have a lasting effect on our domestic dairy sector,” said Pierre Lampron, the organization’s president.The agreement’s provisions to phase in additional U.S. access to Canada’s dairy market, as well as changes in dairy class policies impacting both imports and exports, will have a dramatic impact on investments by the whole sector, he warned.advertisement“We fail to see how this deal can be good for dairy farmers, their families and the 221,000 people employed in the dairy industry,” said Lampron. “Our government is not only contributing to the dismantling of our dairy model in Canada, it is giving up our sovereign right to make our own policies and that should be of concern to all Canadians.”On top of the recent European Union-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) and Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), USMCA means total dairy imports will make up close to 20 percent of the Canadian dairy market, according to DFC.“At the farm gate alone, this represents an annual loss of $1.3 billion for farmers,” Lampron said.DFC previously released calculations indicating dairy imports allowed under the three trade agreements have the potential to curtail a majority of anticipated growth in Canadian butterfat quota, with USMCA having the biggest impact.IDFA: Tariffs, ratification questions remainMichael Dykes, president and chief executive officer of the U.S.-based International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA), said the agreement is a “hollow victory” until the retaliatory tariffs are lifted.“Mexico’s retaliatory tariffs of 25 percent on American cheeses continue to have a negative impact on dairy exports, and U.S. dairy’s access to the Mexican market remains at serious risk,” Dykes said. “We’re increasingly concerned that the benefits won’t be realized as long as the tariffs on steel and aluminum imports remain in place.Dykes is also concerned political changes in the U.S. may hamper ratification by Congress.“We recognize that, given the political changes in the recent midterm elections and the uncertainty over the resolution of the steel and aluminum tariffs, it is very difficult to predict the timing of the final approval of the USMCA by the United States and implementation of the agreement by both Mexico and Canada. We will advocate for expeditious congressional approval so the agreed-to changes can be implemented as soon as possible,” Dykes said.Edge: Certainty is neededLeaders of Edge, a Midwest dairy marketing cooperative based in Green Bay, Wisconsin, also called the signing a critical step forward, but stressed the importance of clearing up remaining uncertainties in the deal and resolving the tariff issue that continues to hurt U.S. dairy farmers.“Given the importance of keeping a NAFTA-style agreement, we are thankful for the hard-fought progress the three countries have made,” said the co-op’s president, Brody Stapel, who farms with his family in Cedar Grove, Wisconsin. “Mexico is the most important trading partner for our dairy community and changes in the deal with Canada should provide benefits there also. At minimum, this gives hope to our dairy farmers who have been fighting to make it through a very difficult time. You can’t overstate the value of having certainty at times like this.Edge members were among those who lost markets for ultrafiltered milk when Canada implemented Class 7 policy in 2017, and Stapel said it’s still unclear what system Canada will use to replace that policy under USMCA. He urged fellow producers to watch for details and implementation closely.“This is not done yet,” Stapel said. “It will be important for dairy farmers to stay engaged in this process. Make sure your representatives in Congress know that the deal needs to provide the best possible outcome for the dairy community.”Removal of the retaliatory tariffs are also critical.“We can’t stress enough to the administration that the dairy community is suffering because of this situation,” he said. “Without an end to the tariffs, the new agreement will be less than a complete win for us.”A win, with a caveatBrian Kuehl, executive director of Farmers for Free Trade, said signing the agreement was “a win” for U.S. farmers, but that it contained a big caveat.“While USMCA offers exciting opportunities for market access into America’s largest and closest ag export markets, any gains will continue to be offset by the losses farmers are experiencing from retaliatory tariffs as long as they are in place,” Kuehl said. “[We] believe that negotiating an end to the tariffs on Canada and Mexico is just as important for the bottom lines of farmers and their families. When it comes to a decision between the original NAFTA or USMCA along with tariffs on ag exports to Canada and Mexico, our farmers will choose the original NAFTA every time.”Through September, trade retaliation imposed by Mexico and Canada faced over $1.1 billion in new tariffs, which caused a 21 percent drop in exports, he said.Farmers for Free Trade is a bipartisan campaign made up of U.S. farmers, ranchers and agricultural businesses that support free trade. It is co-chaired by former U.S. Sens. Max Baucus and Richard Lugar.FarmFirst: Verification neededThe trilateral agreement reflects the long-standing trade relationships between the U.S., Mexico and Canada, according to a statement released by FarmFirst Dairy Cooperative, with dairy farmer members in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Approval by Congress and implementation remain critical next steps.Like other dairy groups, FarmFirst called attention to protecting export markets in Mexico and implementing policy reforms in Canada. It said U.S. dairy companies provide about 75 percent of all the dairy products imported into Mexico. And, the agreement should provide greater market expansion for U.S. dairy into Canada, while addressing pricing structures to ensure fair trade practices.“It will be imperative that the U.S. verifies that Canada maintains its commitments that is consistent to the agreement’s disciplines,” FarmFirst said.China pledges to buy more U.S ag productsThe truce in the U.S.-China tariff wars means the U.S. will retain existing tariff rates of 10 percent on about $200 billion worth of Chinese imports implemented earlier this year. Those tariffs, and resulting retaliatory tariffs implemented by China, are blamed for declining U.S. agricultural exports to China.The tariffs increases, to 25 percent, will be implemented after 90 days if there is no progress in negotiating China’s trade policies and practices, which the office of the United States Trade Representative’s (USTR) declared are “unreasonable and discriminatory and burden or restrict U.S. commerce.”China also agreed to boost its purchases of agricultural goods to reduce its trade imbalance with the U.S.In a statement released by Tariffs Hurt the Heartland, a nationwide anti-tariff campaign that includes more than 150 trade associations and ag commodity groups, spokesman and former U.S. Rep. Charles Boustany called the action “an encouraging first step.” He said the hold on tariff increases must be followed up by rolling back the tariffs currently in place.Angela Hofmann, executive director of Farmers for Free Trade, issues similar sentiments while addressing the Illinois Farm Bureau Convention.“Any signal, even if temporary, that this trade war may de-escalate is welcome news for farmers,” she said. “While farmers are cautiously optimistic about this development, they are also keenly aware that they are still subject to the existing painful retaliatory tariffs and lost markets that have hurt their recently harvested crops and income.”   U.S. President Donald Trump joined Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto in signing the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) during the G20 Summit Meeting in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Nov. 30. And, President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping declared a 90-day truce in an escalating trade war between the U.S. and China, with the U.S. putting on hold an increase in import tariffs scheduled for Jan. 1, 2019. Dave NatzkeEditorProgressive DairymanEmail Dave Natzkedave@progressivepublish.comlast_img read more

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TriQuint Becomes First Manufacturer to Achieve Manufacturer Readiness Level 9 for GaN

first_imgTriQuint Semiconductors announced that it is the first gallium nitride (GaN) RF chip manufacturer to achieve Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) 9. This achievement means TriQuint’s GaN manufacturing processes have met full performance, cost and capacity goals, and that the company has the capability in place to support full rate production. To benchmark MRL 9, TriQuint applied the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory’s rigorous manufacturing readiness assessment tool and criteria to its high frequency, high power GaN production line. TriQuint’s ongoing development of GaN-based devices is leading to smaller, more efficient power amplifiers, typically used for military radar and electronic warfare programs as well as commercial wireless communications and infrastructure. Key to the company’s assessment, TriQuint has shipped more than 170,000 0.25 um GaN power amplifier devices in support of an ongoing international radar production program. During phased array radar field testing, approximately 15,000 devices have accumulated more than 3.67 million device hours, with no reported device failures. TriQuint continues to demonstrate industry-leading reliability with a mean time to failure (MTTF) of greater than 70 million hours at 200 degrees Celsius, substantially greater than the industry standard of 1 million hours MTTF. As an established GaN provider for domestic and international defense programs, TriQuint explored the potential of GaN beginning in 1999, and released its first GaN on silicon carbide (SiC) production process in 2008. Since that point, the company has continued to make significant investments towards maturing the technology. Today, GaN wafers are manufactured with yields that match our conventional GaAs technologies. Leading GaN research and product development for both defense and commercial applications, TriQuint continues to provide record-setting GaN circuit reliability and compact, high efficiency products, paving the way for more robust performance, lower maintenance and longer operational lifetimes. TriQuint is also accredited by the Department of Defense as a Microelectronics Trusted Source (Category 1A) for its foundry; post-processing; packaging and assembly; and RF test services. The Department of Defense’s Manufacturing Readiness Assessment (MRA) ensures that manufacturing, production and quality assurance can meet operational mission needs. This MRA tool assesses science and technology companies on criteria that provide guidance about the maturity and risk of a given technology – reviewing the industrial base readiness; technology development; and quality and manufacturing management. This process ensures that the product or system transitions successfully from the factory to the field, providing the best value for the customer. TriQuint demonstrated that its manufacturing processes met full performance, cost and capacity goals, with the capability in place to support full rate production.last_img read more

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Pitching Matchups For Indians Weekend Series With Chicago

first_img Matt Loede has been a part of the Cleveland Sports Media for over 21 years, with experience covering Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association, the National Football League and even high school and college events. He has been a part of the Cleveland Indians coverage since the opening of Jacobs/Progressive Field in 1994, and spent two and a half years covering the team for 92.3 The Fan, and covers them daily for Associated Press Radio. You can follow Matt on Twitter HERE. Related TopicsCody AndersonIndiansJosh TomlinWhite Sox CLEVELAND – The Indians and White Sox will wrap up the long homestand this weekend at Progressive Field, as the 72-73 Tribe looks to stay in the AL Wild Card chase. They will enter Friday night four games back of the final wild card spot in the American League.Here’s the pitching matchups for the weekend slate. Fri September 18 v Chicago-AL, 7:10pm SportsTime Ohio/WTAM/WMMS/IRNRHP Cody Anderson vs. LHP Chris SaleSat September 19 v Chicago-AL, 7:10pm SportsTime Ohio/WTAM/WMMS/IRNRHP Carlos Carrasco vs. LHP Carlos RodonSun September 20 v Chicago-AL 7:10pm SportsTime Ohio/WTAM/WMMS/IRNRHP Josh Tomlin vs. LHP John Danks center_img Matt Loedelast_img read more

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Men’s Basketball Eyes 5-0 Start Tonight at Spring Hill

first_imgLIVE VIDEOLIVE STATS CONFERENCE’S BEST          ­In three of UWF’s first four games, Jason Laatsch has led UWF in scoring and scored a season-high 17 points last week against Spring Hill. As a sophomore in 2014-15, Laatsch led the team in points in five games. Last year, Laatsch led the team in just one contest. Laatsch currently ranks 13th in the GSC with 14.3 points per game, 13th in three-point field goal percentage (40.9%) and 10th in three-point field goals made per game (2.3). As one of 34 remaining undefeated teams in NCAA Division II, UWF has received votes in the National Basketball Coaches Association poll and currently rank ninth in the South Region according to the D2SIDA poll. UWF currently has the 30th most votes in the national NBCA poll. LAST TIME OUT AGAINST SPRING HILL UWF ranks at the top of the Gulf South Conference in numerous statistical categories, and is one of just three teams left in the league that is still undefeated. West Florida ranks first in the GSC and 12th in the nation with 15.5 offensive rebounds per game. UWF is first in the league and ninth in the nation in scoring defense, allowing opponents to just 61.8 points per game. West Florida is second in the GSC and ninth in the nation in three-point defense, allowing opponents to just a 25.3% success rate from beyond the arc. UWF’s 3.8 turnover margin is the best mark in the conference. At 18.5 turnovers per game, UWF leads the conference and has the 27th highest average in Division II. With 3.75 offensive rebounds per game, Austin Somerfield stands second in the conference and 31st in DII. EMERGING LEADER NATIONAL RECOGNITION  Print Friendly Version MOBILE, Ala. –  With a 4-0 start, the University of West Florida men’s basketball team will eye its second 5-0 start since the team started 9-0 in the 1997-98 season tonight at Spring Hill. The Argos and a struggling 0-8 Badgers squad begin play at 7:00 p.m. UWF used a 54.6% field goal percentage in the second half to distance themselves from the Badgers in a 74-56 win over Spring Hill on Nov. 22. Jason Laatsch led the team with 17 points, while Austin Somerfield, Deangleo Legrier and Darryl Tucker were also all in double figures with point totals of 15,10 and 11, respectively. UWF is now 9-3 all-time against the Badgers, and extended its win streak when playing the Badgers to five with last week’s win.For information on all UWF athletics, visit GoArgos.com 31% of UWF’s point total this year have come from new additions to the team, led by Darryl Tucker who is averaging 8.3 points per game. 39% of UWF’s rebound total have come from newcomers as well, which is also led by Tucker who is averaging 6.5 rebounds per game. UWF’s newcomers, consisting of Herni Ventoniemi, Tucker, Moter Deng, DJ Thorpe and Marvin Jones, have combined to shoot 42.9% (36-84) this season. IMPACT ADDITIONSlast_img read more

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O’Neil To Miss ‘Three To Four Weeks’

first_imgThe midfielder hobbled out of City’s 2-0 defeat at Brentford on Saturday with the injury.Lee Johnson’s side have only seven games left of the season, which concludes on Sunday, May 7th against Birmingham City at Ashton Gate.The head coach told bcfc.co.uk: “Gary has had the injury scanned and it’s shown up a grade two tear of his hamstring.“He’s going to miss three to four weeks, so we may just get him back for the final two games of the season.”last_img

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